Making it happen — the road ahead

June 29, 2018 by  
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Last December, Hawaii became the first U.S. state to commit to 100% renewable fuel sources for public and private ground transportation, with a target of 2045 (and a pledge to transition all fleet vehicles to 100% renewables by 2035). This was not only historic, but an incredibly ambitious proclamation by the state’s four mayors.

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Making it happen — the road ahead

SHOCKA — the story of energy in Hawaii

June 29, 2018 by  
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A short, high-energy rock musical number with choreography from Honolulu Theatre for Youth — a professional theatre production. An inspiring case study of how partners nationally and locally can work together to integrate arts and educational messages to inspire multi-generational solutions as the islands transition to 100% clean energy.

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SHOCKA — the story of energy in Hawaii

Bridge to Hawaii’s future — lessons from the next generation

June 29, 2018 by  
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Hawaii is pursuing a clean energy future that is fast approaching. Those who will carry the renewable electricity torch are just steps away from assuming the responsibility of leading in this industry. The reach of renewables development in Hawaii is broad — from policy to technology and social equity to fragile island ecologies — and tomorrow’s leaders will have a lot to address. So, what is being done to equip future generations with the tools necessary to seamlessly fold into the face-paced, technology-centric clean energy transformation?

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Bridge to Hawaii’s future — lessons from the next generation

Stockton, California is launching the first basic income experiment in the US

January 30, 2018 by  
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Stockton, a city of 300,000 located in California ‘s Central Valley, will soon become the first city in the United States to launch a universal basic income experiment. Certain citizens will receive $500 a month, no strings attached, with the idea of helping people who are struggling economically to thrive. One in four people in Stockton live below the poverty line, thanks to wage stagnation, job loss and rising housing costs, and this move will be an experiment in seeing how a little help can make a big difference in the lives of people who need it. With support from the Economic Security Project (ESP), a basic income advocacy group co-led by Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, Stockton is starting a trial program known as  Stockton Economic Empowerment Demonstration  (SEED) to test how basic income may impact city residents and the local economy. Stockton’s 27-year-old mayor Michael Tubbs first encountered basic income in the writings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who supported a guaranteed income . Elected in November 2016, Tubbs is the city’s first Black mayor and its youngest mayor ever. “I can see the radicalness, but I’m trying to solve the questions that every community has,” Tubbs told Business Insider. Tubbs envisions universal basic income as one component of a local economic development plan, including investments in education, to empower workers to get ahead in an economy that has otherwise been skewed against working-class Americans . Related: Cities in Scotland to start universal basic income trials Tubbs is skeptical of the idea that basic income would cause people to become lazy and inactive. “In our economic structure, the people who work the hardest oftentimes make the least,” Tubbs said . “I know migrant farm workers who do back-breaking labor every day, or Uber drivers and Lyft drivers who drive 10 to 12 hours a day in traffic. You can’t be lazy doing that kind of work.” The specific structure of Stockton’s basic income program is still being developed. However, Tubbs has said that he wants the trial to include people with middle-class and upper-middle-class incomes as well as those in need. He believes that what’s happening in Stockton reflects a broader movement in the United States . “For whatever reason, in this country, we have a very interesting relationship with poverty , where we think people in poverty are bad people,” Tubbs said . “In the next couple years, we’ll see a larger national conversation.” Via Business Insider Images via Deposit Photos ,  Jason Jenkins/Flickr and  Michael Tubbs for Mayor

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Stockton, California is launching the first basic income experiment in the US

Newly-discovered dinosaur species was as long as a school bus – and could help solve a mystery

January 30, 2018 by  
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Fossils in Africa from the Late Cretaceous time period – around 100 to 66 million years ago – are rare. Scientists have been largely kept in the dark about the course of dinosaur evolution on the continent, but a new dinosaur species, Mansourasaurus shahinae , recently unearthed in the Sahara Desert in Egypt , now offers some clues. Carnegie Museum of Natural History dinosaur paleontologist Matt Lamanna said in a statement , “When I first saw pics of the fossils, my jaw hit the floor. This was the Holy Grail – a well-preserved dinosaur from the end of the Age of Dinosaurs in Africa – that we paleontologists had been searching for for a long, long time.” A team led by Hesham Sallam of Mansoura University in Egypt unearthed the fossils. Mansourasaurus shahinae was a long-necked dinosaur with bony plates in its skin, and consumed plants. According to a release from Ohio University, the new species belongs to a group of sauropods , Titanosaurs, which includes the largest land animals we know about. But Mansourasaurus was a moderate-sized titanosaur, weighing about as much as an African bull elephant. Ohio University said its skeleton is “the most complete dinosaur specimen so far discovered from the end of the Cretaceous in Africa” – parts of the skull, lower jaw, ribs, neck and back vertebrae, shoulder and forelimb, hind foot, and dermal plates were preserved. Related: How scaly dinosaurs turned into feathery birds – new gene study offers clues While it’s thrilling to find a new dinosaur species, there are other reasons why paleontologists are so excited about this find. During the Cretaceous Period, the continents joined together as the supercontinent Pangea started to split apart. The lack of a fossil record in Africa from the Late Cretaceous Period has been maddening for researchers who want to know how well-connected Africa was to Europe and Southern Hemisphere landmasses. Sallam and his team scrutinized the bones to determine, per the press release, the dinosaur was “more closely related to dinosaurs from Europe and Asia than it is to those found farther south in Africa or in South America” – so some of the creatures could have moved between Africa and Europe. The Field Museum postdoctoral research scientist Eric Gorscak, who was part of the study, said, “Africa’s last dinosaurs weren’t completely isolated, contrary to what some have proposed in the past. There were still connections to Europe.” The journal Nature Ecology and Evolution published the work online yesterday. 10 researchers from institutions in Egypt and the United States contributed. + Ohio University + Nature Ecology and Evolution Images via Andrew McAfee, Carnegie Museum of Natural History; Mansoura University; and Hesham Sallam, Mansoura University

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Newly-discovered dinosaur species was as long as a school bus – and could help solve a mystery

The world is moving on the Paris Accord — but not fast enough

May 6, 2016 by  
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Leaders from the Compact of Mayors to We Mean Business sounded the alarm at the Climate Action Summit in Washington.

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The world is moving on the Paris Accord — but not fast enough

Mayors from Across the Nation Sign Pledge to Address Climate Change

June 24, 2014 by  
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Mayors from around the nation met this week in Dallas, T exas  to discuss the issues important to their communities, and one of the major topics this year was climate change. Mayors from New Orleans to Seattle and everywhere in between signed a pledge to fight climate change by promoting energy independence at a local, state and federal level, reducing emissions in their own cities and working towards developing renewable energy alternatives. Additionally, for the first time ever, mayors are pledging to help their cities adapt to the changing climate and to help support local grassroots initiatives. Read the rest of Mayors from Across the Nation Sign Pledge to Address Climate Change Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 82 conference of mayors , American Mayor Pledges , Annual Conference of Mayors , anti idling , bike lanes , Climate Change , climate change agreement , climate change agreement mayors , Climate change agreement US , Conference of Mayors , global warming agreement , global warming fight , global warming pledge , global warming policies , global warming politics , Kevin Johnson , Mayor Kevin Johnson , mayor pledges , pledge to fight climate change

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Mayors from Across the Nation Sign Pledge to Address Climate Change

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