Peek inside the tallest cross-laminated timber building in the US

January 2, 2019 by  
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Portland, one of the leading cities for sustainability initiatives in the U.S., is now home to the nation’s tallest mass timber and cross-laminated timber (CLT) building. Designed by local design studio PATH Architecture , Carbon12 soars to a height of 85 feet and comprises eight stories of mixed-use programming along with 14 residential units. Resistant to earthquakes and other natural disasters, the building is also said to surpass the carbon sequestration attributes of LEED Platinum-certified structures. Carbon12 spans an area of 42,000 square feet and is set along the North Williams Corridor of North Portland . Cross-laminated timber was chosen as the primary building material, as opposed to concrete, because of the developer’s desire to create an environmentally friendly building constructed from locally sourced, renewable materials. Made from kiln-dried timber glued and pressed together, CLT is praised for its quick assembly, lightweight properties, strength and ability to sequester carbon. “In addition to its innovative structure, Carbon12 is one of the most well-prepared residential buildings in the country in regard to earthquakes and other natural disasters,” PATH Architecture said. “The Carbon12 team joined the inherent attributes of engineered timber structures, together with the innovative buckling-restrained brace frame core, to create a building that is extremely well equipped for any seismic event. With a thickened basement slab that rests on 41 steel pilings driven 45 feet deep into the ground, Carbon12 is built to protect its occupants.” Related: Architecture students build a tiny CLT classroom in just 3 weeks Built of Sustainable Forestry Initiative-certified softwood timber, the CLT building is only about a quarter of the weight of a concrete structure but equally as strong. “This project truly pushes the envelope on tall mass timber and CLT buildings for Portland, Oregon, and the entire U.S.,” the firm added. “It opens barriers and presents a new era for mass timber in the U.S., where it is well-positioned to be the go-to construction method for this region.” + PATH Architecture Photography by Andrew Pogue via PATH Architecture

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Peek inside the tallest cross-laminated timber building in the US

Long Lodge is an elegant and sustainable mass timber retreat proposal in the woods

November 19, 2018 by  
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Mass timber construction is growing more popular thanks to efforts like the 2018 Maine Mass Timber Competition , which has prompted elegant and sustainable wood-based designs such as “Long Lodge,” a design concept that won a 2018 Honor Award. Proposed for a specific north-facing property along the Appalachian Trail, the building consists of two wings — one for living and the other for sleeping — joined by a central void that frames views of the “Caribou Pond Trail” that connects to the main trail. The cross-laminated timber building would be elevated off the ground to minimize site impact and would also be wrapped in full-length glazing for direct connections and views of the outdoors. The Long Lodge was designed by a four-person team: Yueqi ‘Jazzy’ Li as the design lead, Shuang Bao, Nan Wei and Braham Berg. To protect the building against winter winds from the west, the designers positioned the building on a north-south axis and installed full-height glazing along the south facade to take advantage of solar gain. Elevated wooden walkways lead to the building and convene in the central outdoor terrace with a lookout point and outdoor grill. The west “living” wing consists of the foyer, lounge, food bar, dining area, library, meeting rooms, a kitchen, food storage and a gear storage/drying room. The “sleeping” wing on the opposite side comprises all the sleeping areas, bathrooms and a staff room. Built with cross-laminated timber for everything from the roof trusses and structural panels to the columns and beams, the building is set on insulated continuous footing foundation. Related: MIT develops a sustainable, mass timber-building prototype modeled after the longhouse “The elegant horizontality of the lodge, punctured by the verticality of native pines, bring to mind the pairing of the most fundamental forms,” the design team explained in their project statement. “An upside down glulam timber truss provides a single roof pitch outside but two opposing slopes inside. The truss makes for an efficient use of material as well as providing flexibility for employing other building systems. As the building pinches in the middle and fans out toward the ends, these trusses accommodate varying spans of 25’-60’. Each truss is supported by a series of posts and beams near their ends and a CLT panel in the middle that does the heavy lifting.” + Maine Mass Timber Images by Yueqi ‘Jazzy’ Li, Shuang Bao, Nan Wei and Braham Berg

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Long Lodge is an elegant and sustainable mass timber retreat proposal in the woods

Gorgeous prefab cabin is embedded into the mountainous Norwegian landscape

November 19, 2018 by  
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Located in the mountainous area of Filefjell, Norway, a stunning, solitary cabin peeks out over the snow-covered landscape. Designed by Oslo-based firm  Helen & Hard Architects , the beautiful Gubrandslie Cabin, which is made out of prefabricated solid wood panels, is designed to provide a low-impact shelter that can withstand the extreme climate characterized by harsh wind and snow. Located on the border of Jotunheimen National Park, the private, 1,184-square-foot home is sturdy enough to withstand the weather while simultaneously leaving  minimal impact on the pristine landscape. Large snow falls can wreck havoc on structures in this area, so the architects built the cabin to be inherently sheltered from the elements. Related: Contemporary ski chalet boasts gorgeous panoramic views and a low-energy footprint The first step in creating the  resilient design was to research the local climate and geography. Using extensive wind studies as a guide, the architects formed the home’s volume into an L-shape to mimic the slope of the landscape. Additionally, the cabin is integrated deep into the terrain to protect it from the elements. The roofs are slightly slanted in order to make it easier for the wind and snow to blow over the structure, avoiding heavy snow loads. Using the same climate to the home’s advantage, the architects were focused on creating a serene living space that took full advantage of the stunning, wintry landscape. The volume of the cabin is divided into three levels that follow the topography. The ground floor, which is embedded into the landscape, houses a sauna as well as the garage and plenty of storage. On the first floor, an all-glass facade makes up the entryway, which leads into a spacious, open-plan living area. The living, kitchen and dining space was orientated to face another wall of floor-to-ceiling glass panels , providing breathtaking views of the exterior landscape. On the back side of the cabin, which houses the bedrooms, clerestory windows follow the length of the structure, allowing natural light to flow into the spaces without sacrificing privacy. + Helen & Hard Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Rasmus Norlander and Ragnar Hartvig via Helen & Hard Architects

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Gorgeous prefab cabin is embedded into the mountainous Norwegian landscape

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