Louisiana wants to divert the Mississippi River to restore its coast

May 15, 2018 by  
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Of all the states dealing with global warming, Louisiana may have been hit the hardest. According to NPR , Louisiana has lost a staggering amount of coastline – more than 2,000 square miles – over the past 100 years. State officials have attempted various solutions, including levees, barrier islands, and artificial marshes, and now they want to get the Mississippi River involved to build new land. Over time, Louisiana’s levees have impeded the Mississippi from flooding land and providing necessary water and sediments to marshes, making it harder for the marshes to survive. To help with this problem, Louisiana officials hope to create sediment diversions. This would entail removing parts of the levee and directing the Mississippi to marshes in channels, with the goal of allowing silt and sand to pile up and, ultimately, build land. The state has set aside $1.3 billion for the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion , the first of multiple planned diversions, and is applying for permits for the project. Related: ‘Provocative’ RIG eco-lodge designed to conserve Louisiana’s vanishing marshes Will it work? NPR cited an April 2018 Tulane University -led study scrutinizing whether or not the Mississippi River can build land fast enough. The study found that, around 1,000 years ago, the Mississippi Delta grew about two to three square miles a year. But Louisiana’s land loss has averaged 15 to 20 square miles a year during the last 100 years. Tulane’s press release on the study said, “Although river diversions that bring land building sediment to shrinking coastlands are the best solution to sustaining portions of the Mississippi Delta…the rate of land building will likely be dwarfed by the rate of wetland loss.” A net loss of land will happen, even if restoration projects do go through. But Louisiana’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority engineer manager Rudy Simoneaux told NPR that it’s urgent they divert the Mississippi, saying, “The longer we wait to start doing projects, it will become more difficult to catch up.” Via NPR Images via Depositphotos (1)

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Louisiana wants to divert the Mississippi River to restore its coast

Pew Research Center report finds bipartisan support for renewable energy

May 15, 2018 by  
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Many people see America divided along red and blue lines. While a recent Pew Research Center report did find those divides on issues such as increasing fossil fuels , the report uncovered “pockets of partisan agreement over expanding solar and wind power .” In what the center called a “rare point of bipartisan consensus,” 93 percent of liberal Democrats and 71 percent of conservative Republicans favored expanding wind farms. The numbers in favor of expanding solar farms were even higher, with 96 percent Democratic and 80 percent Republican support. Pew Research Center conducted a national survey among 2,541 people in the U.S. from March 27 to April 9 to probe into Americans’ thoughts about the environment , renewable energy and climate change . President Donald Trump had been in office for just over a year when they conducted the survey; they noted their findings emerged after a year of regulatory policy changes regarding climate and energy. The report showed “majorities see government efforts to protect the environment as insufficient,” with 69 percent of Americans saying the federal government wasn’t doing enough to safeguard water quality in streams, rivers and lakes. 64 percent of respondents said the same of the government’s actions for air quality . Related: 69% of Republicans believe global warming’s seriousness is “generally exaggerated” Americans’ thoughts on climate change still tend to evince a partisan divide. For example, about eight in 10 Democrats, or 83 percent, say the planet is warming, mostly due to human activity. Just 18 percent of Republicans say the same. (46 percent of Republicans say Earth is warming mostly due to natural patterns; 36 percent replied that there is no solid evidence of warming.) There’s a ray of hope with renewable energies, thanks to bipartisan support. Fossil fuels are a different story. Take offshore drilling : about 64 percent of Republicans and 22 percent of Democrats support more drilling. The numbers are similar with coal mining and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking . You can delve further into the Pew report on their website . + Pew Research Center + Pew Research Center Press Release Images via Depositphotos (1, 2)

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Pew Research Center report finds bipartisan support for renewable energy

25% of BP Oil Still in the Water is World’s Eighth Largest Oil Spill All By Itself

August 6, 2010 by  
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photo: Fibonacci Blue via flickr With the news that BP has cemented the leaking well head , and word that 75% of all the oil which poured into the Gulf of Mexico either collected or somehow dispersed, you’re right for starting to breath a sigh of relief. But it occurred to me, if 25% of the oil is still in the water and in the marshes, and rough… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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25% of BP Oil Still in the Water is World’s Eighth Largest Oil Spill All By Itself

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