Hokusai’s ‘The Great Wave’ inspires beautiful home design in California

March 16, 2017 by  
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California-based architect Mario Romano ‘s motto “live in art” is clearly visible in his design of the stunning Preston House, inspired by Hokusai’s “The Great Wave.” The home’s exterior was clad with layers of brushed aluminum to create a “rolling” volume that reflects the varying tones and colors of the sky. Although the 5,700 square-foot home is certainly unique in its artful aesthetic, it also has various eco-friendly features incorporated throughout the design. The home’s sculpture-like volume was meant to mimic the blowing winds, detailed brush strokes and the “solitude of barreled water” found in Hokusai’s famous print. However, the unique materials were not only chosen for their art-inspired aesthetics. The aluminum facade sits one inch above the building’s waterproof skin, strategically allowing it to breathe. This feature pulls double duty as a rain screen system that allows air to flow into the layers, essentially stopping any moisture from growing into mold. It also helps ventilate the home by pushing rising hot air outwards and upwards, away from the main volume. Related: Philip Johnson’s Wiley House hits the market for $12 million The home’s interior is a luxurious space comprised of six bedrooms and five baths and a number of common areas, each with its own distinct design. The architect used his own product line, M.R. Walls and Floors, which are resistant to bacteria and water, to cover much of the walls and flooring. Using customized digital tools and CNC technology, the surfaces convert  eco-friendly materials into bold design patterns inspired by nature. For example, the interior flooring on the second floor appears to be wooden planks, but it’s actually an innovative material called SIMOWOOD, which is made of recycled rice husk. + Mario Romano

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Hokusai’s ‘The Great Wave’ inspires beautiful home design in California

Gorgeous Bostanl Bridge doubles as public park, designed for sunset watching

March 16, 2017 by  
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This beautiful footbridge in Izmir, Turkey, offers much more than a passage from one side of Bostanl? Creek to the other. The timber-clad bridge doubles as a public park with a cascading seating structure that complements the adjacent Bostanl? Sunset Lounge. Studio Evren Ba?bu?: steb designed both the bridge and lounge area as vibrant urban spaces that offer stunning views of the bay. Both interventions are part of the ?zmir Sea coastal regeneration project designed to turn the site into a public attraction point in Izmir’s Kar??yaka district. Perfectly aligned with the masterplan , the footbridge connects two sides of Bostanl? Creek, but also function as a place to rest and enjoy beautiful sunsets. Bow-shaped and elongated, the building uses a girder geometry to allow the passage of small boats underneath. The steel frame supports several cascading thermo-wood surfaces that can be used as seating surfaces. Related: Gateway Villetaneuse footbridge unfurls like a leaf over train tracks outside Paris The same materiality and design concept extends to the Bostanl? Sunset Lounge, which forms an inviting urban space that stretches between the artificial slope and the embankment. Wide ash wood gives warmth to the project which promotes an easy way of living–the vision of the entire Izmir Sea coastal regeneration initiative. + Studio Evren Ba?bu?: steb Via Archdaily Photos by ZM Yasa Architecture Photography

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Gorgeous Bostanl Bridge doubles as public park, designed for sunset watching

Breezy addition keeps cool in Melbournes summers with smart passive design

March 16, 2017 by  
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Sustainability and a tight budget were the driving features for this bright and airy lean-to extension to a detached 1960s home. Designed by Warc Studio , the timber-and-glass addition houses a spacious open-plan living area, dining space, and kitchen that connect to a rear garden. To meet sustainability requirements, the architects used locally and sustainably sourced timber, stressed resource efficiency , and promoted natural cooling with operable window openings and solar shading fins. Located in the Melbourne suburb of Oakleigh, Australia, the new addition was inspired by the mono-pitched lean-to structures prevalent to the homes in the area. The architects put a modern twist on the seemingly ubiquitous building structure by combining two gabled roofs with differing gradients. “The design program was driven by resource efficiency which was essential to delivering both economic and sustainable objectives,” wrote the architects. “The resulting roof form provides a compact building envelope: the surface area of the additions are around 12% less than if a flat roof / flat ceiling solution had been employed with the same built volume. This in turn translates to increased efficiency of the thermal envelope and reduced capital material consumption.” Related: Old bungalow transformed into a light-filled dwelling with recycled brick Large windows open the new addition up to views and natural light , reducing reliance on artificial lighting. To mitigate solar heat gain, the architects strategically placed window openings and an automated operable roof window for cross-ventilation . Laminated timber fins jut out from the glass panes to provide shade. The roof is lined with white steel sheet lining to minimize solar heat gain. + Warc Studio Via ArchDaily Images © Aaron Pocock

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Breezy addition keeps cool in Melbournes summers with smart passive design

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