Scotland bans plastic-stemmed cotton swabs in bid to combat plastic pollution

October 17, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scotland bans plastic-stemmed cotton swabs in bid to combat plastic pollution

Following backlash concerning plastic waste buildup in beaches and oceans, Scotland is now the first country in the United Kingdom to officially ban the manufacture, supply and sale of plastic-stemmed cotton swabs, commonly known by the brand name of Q-tips. Environmentalists and conservationists are hailing the change as wonderful news for wildlife and ecosystems. Before the new ban came into effect, several cosmetic giants already made the switch to manufacturing more biodegradable alternatives, like paper-stemmed versions. For instance, pharmaceutical company Johnson and Johnson made the switch two years ago. Related: The reusable LastSwab might just be the last ear swab you ever buy Speaking about the new legislation, Scottish environment secretary Roseanna Cunningham shared that she is “proud the Scottish government has become the first U.K. administration to ban plastic-stemmed cotton buds. Single-use plastic products are not only wasteful but generate unnecessary litter that blights our beautiful beaches and green spaces while threatening our wildlife on land and at sea.” The Marine Conservation Society has indicated that plastic-stemmed cotton swabs have been pervasively littering coastal regions and damaging marine ecology, often disconcertingly found in the intestines of seabird, mammal, fish and turtle populations. In the U.K. alone, estimated consumption of the plastic-stemmed cotton buds is in excess of 1.8 million. Besides that, the journal Science Advances has cited that humans have created 8.3 billion metric tons of plastics since the early 1950s. Sadly, plastic’s durability wreaks environmental havoc, and current recycling systems are not able to keep up with plastic pollution. Even the Ellen MacArthur Foundation , in partnership with the World Economic Forum, has reported that by 2050, there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish, if plastic production rates continue. It is hoped that the new ban will promote more useful regulation to protect the environment while simultaneously affecting consumer behaviors so that the public is better informed about best practices where single-use plastic is concerned. Emma Burlow, Head of Circular Economy at Resource Futures, said that the ban is not only positive for the environment but also for both the economy and job creation. “Banning a product stimulates innovation and that leads to opportunity,” Burlow said. This new ban plays a huge role in the current struggle against ocean pollution, opening up further environmental action and reforms to the U.K.’s resource and waste management system. By 2020, the U.K. is also expected to ban single-use plastic drink straws and single-use plastic stirrers to curtail plastic waste. Via TreeHugger Image via Hans

See original here:
Scotland bans plastic-stemmed cotton swabs in bid to combat plastic pollution

American Express to offer credit card created with upcycled ocean plastic

June 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on American Express to offer credit card created with upcycled ocean plastic

Plastic is part of so many products in our day-to-day lives, from obvious ones like plastic bags to ones you may not often think about, like your plastic credit card. American Express plans to offer the first credit card ever made with ocean plastic in a collaboration with Parley for the Oceans . The company is also committing to reduce single-use plastics in its operations worldwide. We’re collaborating w/ @parleyxxx to combat marine plastic pollution. Learn abt our plans to introduce an Amex Card made primarily from plastics recovered from the ocean & our journey to reduce single-use plastic globally https://t.co/tAWsHPjWES #AmexLife #KeepItBlue #AmexParley pic.twitter.com/7WdNeGBz3H — American Express (@AmericanExpress) June 7, 2018 American Express’s ocean plastic card will be manufactured primarily with recovered plastic from coasts and the oceans and is intended to raise awareness of ocean plastic pollution . In a press release , the company said the card is a prototype at the moment, but could be ready for the public in around 12 months. Related: Adidas unveils a Manchester United jersey created with ocean plastic Parley’s Avoid, Intercept, Redesign (AIR) philosophy is also inspiring an American Express corporate pledge to “limit single-use plastics, intercept plastic waste and redesign existing materials and plastic products.” American Express provided six steps it will take, including phasing out single-use plastic straws and stirrers for Centurion airport lounges and major offices in about a month, and phasing out single-use plastics for the airport lounges by the end of 2018. It will also undertake annual company-run river and coastal clean-ups. American Express aims to lower virgin plastic in card products, and create what it described as a comprehensive waste reduction strategy to up recycling rates and cut single-use plastic in its operations by the end of 2018. Finally, the company will pursue a zero waste certification by 2025 for its New York City headquarters. “Every second breath we take is created by the oceans ,” Parley for the Oceans founder Cyrill Gutsch said in a statement . “Without them, we can’t exist. American Express is creating a symbol of change and inviting their network to shape a blue future, one based on creativity, collaboration and eco-innovation.” + American Express + Parley for the Oceans Image courtesy of American Express

See the original post: 
American Express to offer credit card created with upcycled ocean plastic

Scotland to ban manufacture and sale of plastic cotton swabs

January 11, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scotland to ban manufacture and sale of plastic cotton swabs

Scotland could be the first country in the United Kingdom to ban plastic -stemmed cotton swabs. Both the manufacture and sale of the polluting items – hundreds were found during a recent Gullane beach clean-up – would be banned. Environment secretary Roseanna Cunningham said, “…people are continuing to flush litter down their toilets and this has to stop. Scotland’s sewerage infrastructure collects and treats some 945 million liters of wastewater each day. These systems are not designed to remove small plastic items such as plastic buds, which can kill marine animals and birds that swallow them.” Campaigners said the Scotland government plans to ban manufacture and sale of plastic-handled cotton swabs, according to The Guardian – and that move could slash the country’s contribution to ocean plastic pollution in half, according to Friends of the Earth Scotland director Richard Dixon. Cunningham launched a public consultation on a ban, describing it as evidence of the government’s goal to address marine plastic. Related: Scientists call for a worldwide ban on the ‘global hazard’ of glitter It’s a photo that I wish didn’t exist but now that it does I want everyone to see it. What started as an opportunity to photograph a cute little sea horse turned into one of frustration and sadness as the incoming tide brought with it countless pieces of trash and sewage. This sea horse drifts long with the trash day in and day out as it rides the currents that flow along the Indonesian archipelago. This photo serves as an allegory for the current and future state of our oceans. What sort of future are we creating? How can your actions shape our planet??.?thanks to @eyosexpeditions for getting me there and to @nhm_wpy and @sea_legacy for getting this photo in front of as many eyes as possible. Go to @sea_legacy to see how you can make a difference. . #plastic #seahorse #wpy53 #wildlifephotography #conservation @nhm_wpy @noaadebris #switchthestick A post shared by Justin Hofman (@justinhofman) on Sep 12, 2017 at 8:28am PDT There have been concerns over how many of the items have washed up on beaches after people flushed them down toilets. Environmental charity Fidra recently found hundreds on the beach. The Guardian reported most large retailers have made the change to biodegradable paper-stemmed swabs, but smaller retailers still sell imported plastic-stemmed ones. Fidra, which is behind The Cotton Bud Project , said on the campaign website the physical structure of plastic cotton buds allows them to bypass filters at many waste treatment facilities, and they can be released into the sea with untreated sewage. There, they can “attract and concentrate background pollutants to toxic levels” and be consumed by animals who mistake them for food – causing the plastic and toxins to enter the food chain . The Cotton Bud Project encourages people to toss cotton swabs in the trash, not the toilet, and lists brands that sell swabs with biodegradable paper stems. Via The Guardian Images via Depositphotos ( 1 , 2 )

The rest is here: 
Scotland to ban manufacture and sale of plastic cotton swabs

South American Plastic Banks Turn Pollution into Currency

April 28, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on South American Plastic Banks Turn Pollution into Currency

Canadian Entrepreneurs David Katz and Shaun Frankson are on a mission to tackle poverty and plastic pollution in one fell swoop. Their startup Plastic Bank recognizes that many areas affected by plastic pollution are also home to large numbers of people struggling to make ends meet. Their ‘Social Plastic’ model turns plastic into currency, rewarding the work involved in cleaning up the environment and stopping plastics from ending up in the sea. Read on to find out about their pilot project in Peru. Read the rest of South American Plastic Banks Turn Pollution into Currency Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3D printing , Ending Poverty , marine plastic pollution , peru , plastic bank , plastic pollution , plastics recycling , Poverty

See the rest here:
South American Plastic Banks Turn Pollution into Currency

Sharp Plastic Packing Bands Prove Deadly for Marine Mammals

February 11, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Sharp Plastic Packing Bands Prove Deadly for Marine Mammals

Animal lovers and fastidious fishermen are already aware of the dangers that plastic six-pack drink rings, fishing line, hooks, and rubber bands pose to ocean creatures. However, a far more lethal class of marine debris has appeared on the scene in the form of plastic packing bands. These non-biodegradable loops can ensnare seals and sea lions, causing gruesome wounds, and restrict mobility to such an extent that the animal starves. Read the rest of Sharp Plastic Packing Bands Prove Deadly for Marine Mammals Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: environmental destruction , marine mammal , marine plastic pollution , microplastic pollution , national marine fisheries service hotline , NOAA , ocean conservation , pinniped , plastic gyre , plastic packing bands , plastic pollution , sea lion , seal        

Read the original post: 
Sharp Plastic Packing Bands Prove Deadly for Marine Mammals

PHOTOS: Young Projects’ Playful, Matchmaking Sculpture Pops Up in Times Square

February 11, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on PHOTOS: Young Projects’ Playful, Matchmaking Sculpture Pops Up in Times Square

Young Projects has made it a little bit easier to find love in the big city with their unique interactive sculpture in Times Square. Called “Match-Maker” , the intriguing heart-shaped public artpiece invites viewers to peer through strategically-placed periscopes to see their four most ideal astrological mates on the other side. Read on to check out more photos of this cupid-like tangle of tubes. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , Kammetal , sustainable design , Times Square , times square alliance , times square heart sculpture , valentine sculpture , valentines day new york city , valentines day nyc , van alen institute , Young Projects        

Read more here: 
PHOTOS: Young Projects’ Playful, Matchmaking Sculpture Pops Up in Times Square

Bad Behavior has blocked 1165 access attempts in the last 7 days.