‘World’s deepest plastic bag’ found in the Mariana Trench

May 10, 2018 by  
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Plastic pollution is a scourge upon the planet – and it turns out that it’s reached the deepest ocean trench on the earth. While studying man-made debris in the deep sea, scientists recently discovered a large number of single-use plastic products near the ocean floor – including a plastic bag in the Mariana Trench , almost 36,000 feet beneath the ocean’s surface. Plastics are now showing up in the very deepest, most remote parts of our planet. This plastic bag was found at the bottom of the Mariana Trench, nearly 11km under water. It's time to #BreakFreeFromPlastics . Retweet if you agree. https://t.co/18RZyUIA4K pic.twitter.com/95Rts4vDyg — Greenpeace East Asia (@GreenpeaceEAsia) May 10, 2018 The bag, which The Telegraph referred to as the “world’s deepest plastic bag,” was one of 3,425 pieces of man-made debris from the past 30 years that scientists recorded in the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)’s Deep-sea Debris Database . Launched for public use last year, the database includes photographs and images of trash obtained by remotely-operated vehicles and deep-sea submersibles. While the bag’s discovery came to light in an April article for Marine Policy , JAMSTEC’s video of the debris lists the dive date as 1998. JAMSTEC led the team that wrote the article, which included researchers from the United Nations Environment World Conservation Monitoring Center and Marine Works Japan . Related: “Extraordinary” levels of pollution found in deepest parts of the ocean The scientists said over 33 percent of the debris “was macro-plastic, of which 89 percent was single-use products, and these ratios increased to 52 percent and 92 percent, respectively, in areas deeper than 6,000 meters.” They spotted deep-sea organisms in 17 percent of the images of plastic debris, “which include entanglement of plastic bags on chemosynthetic cold seep communities.” Rubber, metal, glass, cloth, and fishing gear were among the other debris found. The scientists also sounded the alarm on plastic pollution’s threat to deep-sea ecosystems, pointing to a statistic estimating that almost 80 percent of global plastic waste generated from 1950 to 2015 remains in landfills or the environment , and has not been burned or recycled . According to the research team, “Minimizing the production of plastic waste and its flow into the coastal areas and ocean is the only fundamental solution to the problem of deep-sea plastic pollution.” You can check out a video of the Mariana Trench plastic on the JAMSTEC website . + Marine Policy Via The Telegraph Image via Depositphotos

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‘World’s deepest plastic bag’ found in the Mariana Trench

James Cameron Completes Historic Dive Into Deepest Point on the Planet, Mariana Trench

March 27, 2012 by  
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On Monday morning, James Cameron completed his historic journey to the Mariana Trench – the deepest point on the planet. The director of such blockbuster movies as  Titanic and Avatar dove almost seven miles under the surface of the Pacific Ocean and spent three hours filming the dark seabed. For Cameron, the dive is the culmination of a lifelong fascination with the oceans. He began incorporating themes of the deep sea in his 1989 move  The Abyss , and after the 1997 release of Titanic , followed that up with a documentary on the Titanic’s wreck in 2003. Meanwhile, he has made 73 trips far beneath the ocean’s surface and will follow today’s historic milestone with more ventures into the Mariana Trench. Read the rest of James Cameron Completes Historic Dive Into Deepest Point on the Planet, Mariana Trench Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Deepsea Challenger , james cameron , Mariana trench , National Geographic Society , ocean exploration , pacific ocean , Scripps Institution of Oceanography , university of hawaii

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James Cameron Completes Historic Dive Into Deepest Point on the Planet, Mariana Trench

Giant Amoebae Discovered in Mariana Trench (Video)

October 24, 2011 by  
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National Geographic Society Remote Imaging Dropcam /via Deep sea researchers have caught footage of the most unlikely and extreme of creatures: giant amoebas. Using specially-rigged untethered landers or “dropcams,” the team spotted these mysterious single-celled organisms earlier this summer in the planet’s deepest known region, the Mariana Trench of the Pacific Ocean. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Giant Amoebae Discovered in Mariana Trench (Video)

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