Hydroelectric art gallery will generate enough wave power to be 100% self-sustaining

February 27, 2020 by  
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London-based architect Margot Krasojevic has just unveiled a futuristic art gallery that runs on hydroelectric power. Slated for the coastal Russian region of Sochi, the Hydroelectric Sculpture Gallery will harness enough wave energy to not only be 100% self-sufficient, but it will also be able to channel surplus energy back into the grid, powering around 200 nearby houses and businesses as a result. The art gallery will be located on Sochi’s coastline, where it will use the exceptionally strong coastal swells from the Black Sea to power a water turbine system . Krasojevic’s vision depicts a sculptural volume that rises out of an existing wooden promenade. The building, which will be partly submerged into the sea, will be strategically angled at 45 degrees to the coastline for maximum wave exposure. Related: Oil rig off South Korea’s coast to become a floating hotel that operates on tidal energy According to the design plans, the building will “use the environment’s characteristics to generate clean, sustainable energy, without affecting the quality and nature of the landscape.” State-of-the-art engineering will allow the structure to harvest wave energy through oscillating water columns as the waves crash against it. Generating up to 300kW, the system will enable the gallery to operate completely off the grid and channel surplus energy back into the grid. It could supply clean energy to approximately 200 households and businesses in the same area. Visitors to the futuristic gallery will enter through a long walkway stretching out from the shore. The robust exterior of the building will comprise various walkways and ramps that wind around the steel structure. Sinuous volumes will conceal the building’s many turbines, which will also be partially submerged underwater. Inside, the spaces will reflect the building’s functions. The various galleries will be laid out into a power plant format, with steel clad ceilings that mimic the rolling waves that crash into the exterior. Irregularly shaped skylights will also create a vibrant, kaleidoscope show of shadow and light throughout the day. + Margot Krasojevic Images via Margot Krasojevic

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Hydroelectric art gallery will generate enough wave power to be 100% self-sustaining

Floating, solar-powered ‘dragonfly’ bridge can sail to new locations

August 10, 2017 by  
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This floating pedestrian bridge  can sail along rivers and oceans like a boat. Designer Margot Krasojevic conceived the bridge as a flexible structure that can be folded, stacked and expanded so that it can be moored along quaysides, sailed to different locations, or permanently positioned. The Ordos government commissioned Krasojevic to design a pedestrian bridge which would cross the Wulanmulun River, located in Ordos city, Kangbashi district Mongolia. The SailBoat bridge consists of a main floating section, three expanding walkways, and a carbon fiber triple sail. The sail can be lowered and raised by a buoyancy rotator and allows the bridge to function as a sailboat in order to reach new locations. Cylindrical cross-flow turbines function as rafts and help stabilize the primary structure. Related: Margot Krasojevic designs Belgrade trolly system powered by piezoelectricity A hydraulic telescopic secondary structure supports the pedestrian walkway which expands and contracts into the main body of the structure. The walkways are flexible and can adapt to different spans. Caisson foundations and screw-in moorings can be used to permanently stabilize the bridge. A rotating Mobius ballast chamber hydraulically operated by a thruster and powered by photovoltaic cells rotates the sails which are made from lightweight aluminium and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer. + Margot Krasojevic Architecture

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Floating, solar-powered ‘dragonfly’ bridge can sail to new locations

Margot Krasojevi 3D prints recycled plastic into a delicate Lace LED lamp

January 11, 2017 by  
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Architect and designer Margot Krasojevi? shows off the beautiful possibilities of 3D printing in her latest work, the Lace LED. Made from recycled post-consumer plastics, the LED light diffuser gets its lace-like quality from its layers of geometric shapes that fan out from a central point. The Lace LED is designed as a suspended work of kinetic art . The diffuser is hinged on a pivot that rotates within a frame to create different patterns of light and shadow. “These complex shapes direct LED light through the entire pattern, which diffuses, deflects and refracts light creating a moving shadow whilst focusing it,” write Margot Krasojevi? Architects. “The form is the antithesis of the mass-produced recycled bottles and waste used in its fabrication.” Related: Designer David Grass 3D-Prints Light Bulbs in the Shape of Modern Cityscapes The diffuser’s intricate parametric pattern was created from a digital modeling program. In addition to recycled plastic , the Lace LED is 3D printed in ceramic, polymer, silver, and brass. + Margot Krasojevi? Via v2com Images via Margot Krasojevi?

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Margot Krasojevi 3D prints recycled plastic into a delicate Lace LED lamp

All-black timber Geilo Cabin makes the most of the winter sunlight

January 11, 2017 by  
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The dark tones of this secluded cabin contrasts the white winter landscape of Geilo, one of Norway’s most popular ski resort towns. Lund Hagem Architects used dark concrete and timber to reference the region’s traditional houses and allow occupants to enjoy views of the stunning natural surroundings from warmth of the interior. Built for Norway’s harsh climate and heavy snowfall, the cabin is placed low in the landscape and insulated by thick concrete walls. During winter the cabin can be accessed only by ski or snowmobile , and almost completely covered in snow. Related: Coastal cabin in Norway is a perfect indoor retreat for outdoor lovers It comprises three volumes–the main cabin, guest house and carport–unified under a single U-shaped pitched roof which forms a sheltered inner courtyard . The orientation of the openings allow low winter sun to reach the interior during the day. Black concrete floors and oak treated with iron sulfate dominate the interior, accentuating the white winter landscape. Additional light is introduced through a long single-frame skylight and a fireplace hanging from the roof. + Lund Hagem Architects Via Plataforma Arquitectura Photos by Marc Goodwin

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All-black timber Geilo Cabin makes the most of the winter sunlight

Margot Krasojevic designs Belgrade trolly system powered by piezoelectricity

July 26, 2016 by  
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The project uses 3d-printed piezoelectric cells applied to each trolley pole, trolley bus elevation, tire and overhead wire. Aluminum consolidated carbon nanotubes , which increase the heat and electrical conductivity of the material embedded within the structure, are combined with the steel frame, concrete-clad helix. The aluminum frames are printed with piezoelectric crystals that generate electricity from the air flow and pressure exerted from the trolleybus and its overhead wire movement. Related: Margot Krasojevic’s solar-powered sand turbine hotel aims to stop the spread of the Gobi Desert Elevated walls further increase the vibration of the trolley-poles, augmented by wind and rain. These vibrations amplify the the piezoelectric cell displacements which, in turn, generate energy. The design will act as an electrical amplifier, and will provide street lighting and WiFi access to immediate neighborhoods. Users will also be able to use the system to power their gadgets and smart cars , while the electric current stimulates root growth in plants. + Margot Krasojevic

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Margot Krasojevic designs Belgrade trolly system powered by piezoelectricity

Margot Krasojevic’s Fresnel Hydrofoil Trimaran is a solar-powered perpetual-motion vehicle

January 5, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Margot Krasojevic’s Fresnel Hydrofoil Trimaran is a solar-powered perpetual-motion vehicle Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , energy efficient yacht , Fresnel Lenses , green transportation , hydrofoils , margot krasojevic , maritime vehicle , perpetual motion , photovoltaic cells , solar concentrators , Solar Power , solar-powered design

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Margot Krasojevic’s Fresnel Hydrofoil Trimaran is a solar-powered perpetual-motion vehicle

Solar-Powered Electric Coral Reef Station Stimulates Coral Growth

February 4, 2014 by  
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The electric coral reef station floats between areas that require coral reefs to dissipate storms near coastlines. Complex geometry used in the solar-powered station, designed by Margot Krasojevic , buffers oncoming waves, slowing them down in the process. Floating cells power an electric circuit that stimulates limestone and coral growth, which eventually grow onto the metal cages that are dropped into the ocean to rehabilitate the world’s endangered coral reefs . + Margot Krasojevic The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , clean tech , coral reef , coral reef restoration , environmental destruction , green design , high-tech , margot krasojevic , reader submission , renders        

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Solar-Powered Electric Coral Reef Station Stimulates Coral Growth

Pop-Up Hangar Hotel Provides Busy Passengers a Safe Place to Sleep on the Jetway

July 22, 2013 by  
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The Jetway Hotel  is a pop-up, short-stay hangar accommodation that can be wheeled to different airport docking locations to provide safe spaces for passengers to rest before departing. The scheme is composed of three telescopic fiberglass polymer-clad shells, and expandable interior sections lined with a combination of laminated glass, photovoltaic cells and low-resolution LEDs. And for those worried about sleeping next to a noisy tarmac, the interior spaces can be programmed to create an array of fully immersive environments for a cozy stay. + Jetway Hotel The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: airplane hangar , airport design , hotel suite , pop-up designs , pop-up hotel , portable hangar        

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Pop-Up Hangar Hotel Provides Busy Passengers a Safe Place to Sleep on the Jetway

Announcing the Lighten Up LED Lighting Competition Winners!

May 14, 2013 by  
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After weeks of submissions and an intense week of online voting, we’re excited to finally announce the two winners of Inhabitat’s Lighten Up! Lighting Design Competition . We received hundreds of entries featuring projects that employ LEDs in innovative and interesting ways, ranging from a  colorful art installation that reacts to changing light  to a restaurant donning beautiful ceiling lamps to a research campus adorned with LED back-lit wood walls . We narrowed all the entries we received down to just 30 finalists, and then left it up to Inhabitat readers to decide which two designs were most deserving of $1000 prizes from Elemental LED . So who won? Now the moment you’ve all been waiting for… Drumroll Please………. Read the rest of Announcing the Lighten Up LED Lighting Competition Winners! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “wind power” , 3D printed lamp , 3D printed light , 3D printing , aerodynamics , Air Turbine , Air Turbine Light , diTTo design , diTTo’s LED Acoustic Cloud Installation , green design , green interiors , green lighting , inhabitat competition , Inhabitat Design Competition , interior lighting design , LED Acoustic Cloud Installation , LED lighting installation , Lighten Up , lighten up competition , Lighten Up LED Lighting competition , Lighten Up LED Lighting competition commercial winner , Lighten Up LED Lighting competition residential winner , lighten up lighting design competition , lighten up lighting design winner , lighten up winner , lighting object , margot krasojevic , Rolluda Architects , wind-powered light Lighten Up LED Lighting competition        

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Announcing the Lighten Up LED Lighting Competition Winners!

Floating Hydroelectric Waterfall Prison Generates Renewable Energy at Sea

March 22, 2013 by  
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Architect Margot Krasojevic ‘s Hydroelectric Waterfall Prison is a sustainable prison that doubles as a hydroelectric power station. Designed for a site in the Pacific Ocean close to the Canadian coastline, the concrete and steel structure floats upon a tension-leg platform tethered to the seabed. Deep ocean water is pumped up into the main structure and distributed through nozzles in the cantilevered surface, which direct water onto a series of Tyson turbines below to generate electricity. Underwater cables then run the electrical power to the mainland + Margot Krasojevic The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , floating prison , green architecture , Hydroelectric Waterfall Prison , hydroelectricity , jail , margot krasojevic , ocean prison , prison , renewable energy

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Floating Hydroelectric Waterfall Prison Generates Renewable Energy at Sea

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