How Michelin is finding a second life for tires

May 29, 2018 by  
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It’s beginning to integrate circular economy principles into its core manufacturing processes.

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How Michelin is finding a second life for tires

Why Apple is getting cozy with aluminum giants Alcoa and Rio Tinto

May 11, 2018 by  
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Goal: To reinvent a process that has stood still since the 19th century.

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Why Apple is getting cozy with aluminum giants Alcoa and Rio Tinto

MIT just discovered a way to mass produce graphene in large sheets

April 18, 2018 by  
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Scientists used to make graphene -based membranes in small batches in a laboratory. But a new breakthrough at MIT enables researchers to roll out large sheets of high-quality graphene. The continuous manufacturing process can produce five centimeters of high-quality graphene per minute. The longest run was nearly four hours, and it generated around 10 meters of continuous graphene. MIT is calling the development “the first demonstration of an industrial, scalable method for manufacturing high-quality graphene that is tailored for use in membranes that filter a variety of molecules.” These membranes could be utilized in biological separation or desalination , for example. The researchers drew from the common industrial roll-to-roll approach blended with chemical vapor deposition, a common graphene-fabrication technique. Related: Newly discovered property of graphene could lead to infinite clean energy Their system is comprised of two spools linked by a conveyor belt, which runs through a furnace. According to MIT, here’s how it works: “The first spool unfurls a long strip of copper foil, less than one centimeter wide. When it enters the furnace, the foil is fed through first one tube and then another, in a ‘split-zone’ design. While the foil rolls through the first tube, it heats up to a certain ideal temperature, at which point it is ready to roll through the second tube, where the scientists pump in a specified ratio of methane and hydrogen gas, which are deposited onto the heated foil to produce graphene.” MIT associate professor of mechanical engineering John Hart said, “In the end-to-end process, we would need to integrate more operations into the manufacturing line. For now, we’ve demonstrated that this process can be scaled up, and we hope this increases confidence and interest in graphene-based membrane technologies, and provides a pathway to commercialization.” The journal Applied Materials and Interfaces recently published the work; scientists from Vanderbilt University , the California Institute of Technology and the National University of Singapore contributed. + MIT News + Applied Materials and Interfaces Images via Christine Daniloff, MIT and courtesy of the researchers

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MIT just discovered a way to mass produce graphene in large sheets

A giant, air-purifying "cloud" just popped up in the middle of Milan

April 18, 2018 by  
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If you’re tired of breathing less-than-clean city air , Milan has a temporary respite for you. “Transitions,” a giant, cloud-like pod, has landed in the heart of the Brera Design District for Milan Design Week 2018 . As envisioned by Takehiro Ikeda, the enormous “water-drop pavilion” uses Panasonic ‘s cutting edge air-purifying technology to provide all those who enter with clean, cool air. Most cloud-like design installations create mist using gases, which aren’t exactly good for the visitors’ health. The Panasonic pavilion, however, employs only natural water to build an intangible and immersive experience: a walk through atmospheric, ultra-fine mist created with the company’s groundbreaking technology. Panasonic’s “Nanoe x” technology collects moisture from the air and uses high voltage to create nano-sized particles of water. Highly reactive components called OH radicals — which are generated in huge numbers and inhibit viruses and bacteria — remove odors and allergens and prevent mold. The pavilion utilizes compressed air to turn water into a “silky fine mist.” Unlike a conventional two-fluid nozzle model, this technology creates a fine mist using low-pressure air and eliminates the need for large compressors, making it an attractive option for city cooling technology. Takehiro Ikeda said the “Transition” installation is a preview of the latest air purification research, which will be used during the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo to guarantee a pleasant, cool atmosphere during the hot Japanese summer. Related: Kengo Kuma wins bid for Tokyo’s Olympic stadium, Zaha Hadid speaks out The project is also energy-efficient. Instead of using large amounts of natural resources to power the air conditioning system, the pavilion – which measures about 20 meters in diameter – needs only a few liters of water for each functioning cycle. With this installation, Panasonic is celebrating its 100-year anniversary and transitioning towards a new creative philosophy: designing products, services and experiences that go beyond physical products to address emotional and environmental well-being. + Milan Design Week 2018 Images via Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat

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A giant, air-purifying "cloud" just popped up in the middle of Milan

Is additive manufacturing good for life?

April 12, 2018 by  
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3D printing has great potential for sustainability. For human health, not so much — yet.

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Is additive manufacturing good for life?

Is additive manufacturing good for life?

April 12, 2018 by  
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3D printing has great potential for sustainability. For human health, not so much — yet.

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Is additive manufacturing good for life?

Covestro’s manifesto for a sustainable, clean economy

April 12, 2018 by  
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Richard Northcote, chief sustainability officer at the chemicals giant, proves it’s not the size of the carbon reduction, but what you do with it, that counts.

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Covestro’s manifesto for a sustainable, clean economy

The big idea behind corporate desalination projects

March 22, 2018 by  
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New technologies are radically reducing plant construction costs and, as a result, the total cost of water.

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The big idea behind corporate desalination projects

Here’s how we aim to close the loop on ocean plastic pollution

March 22, 2018 by  
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The Closed Loop Fund and Ocean Conservancy are attacking plastic trash in the oceans with a bevy of corporate partners, from 3M to PepsiCo.

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Here’s how we aim to close the loop on ocean plastic pollution

How Whirlpool uses local data to spin up global cleanup plans

January 30, 2018 by  
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When it comes to holistic insight, the more perspectives, the better.

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How Whirlpool uses local data to spin up global cleanup plans

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