Manatees taken off the endangered species list – but that may not be good

April 3, 2017 by  
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Manatees are found in Florida yet beloved around the world for their plodding, languid behavior and slightly dopey appearance. Since the 1970s, clubs and groups have raised awareness and funds to protect these so-ugly-they-are-cute “sea cows”, which reside in shallow, slow-moving bodies of water. Citing a consistently growing population and successful regulations and efforts by the government and local community, the US Fish and Wildlife Service officially removed West Indian manatees from the endangered species list last week. But that may not be a good thing. While “downlisting” these manatees from endangered to “threatened” might seem like a cause for celebration, some animal and environmental groups aren’t quite ready to break out the algae, grass, or mangrove leaves (preferred snacks of the species). The Save the Manatee Club, for example, is concerned about habitat destruction for the manatees and motorboat accidents and deaths as well as as a loosening or reversal of environmental regulations under the current administration. The US Fish and Wildlife Service purports that federal and state protections for manatees won’t change, but certain manatee-minded parties are pushing for a long-term manatee recovery plan that would address the boat- and habitat-related problems. Effects of climate change and chemical runoff ( leading, in the past, to toxic algal blooms ) are also continuing causes for concern. Related| How Climate Change is Killing Hundreds of Endangered Florida Manatees Manatees were put on the endangered species list in 1967. While manatee numbers dipped to a population of only a few hundred in the 1970s, their population has increased dramatically with more than 6,000 manatees counted for the past three years. A survey this year found a preliminary total of 6,620 manatees. Efforts including river habitat restoration and regulations targeting speeders in manatee zones are among the reasons for the manatee population’s recovery. Via CNN Lead image © Carlton Ward Jr. for Visit Florida , Wikimedia , flickr user USFWS Endangered Species

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Manatees taken off the endangered species list – but that may not be good

Timber Chimney House gives farmhouse vernacular a modern twist

April 3, 2017 by  
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Although the Chimney House is a thoroughly contemporary design, the home’s aesthetic pays homage to the area’s traditional farmhouse vernacular . Designed by Dekleva Gregoric Architects , the home in Logatec, Slovenia is clad in dark timber panels and it features a striking gabled roof . However, the heart of the design is a massive chimney that runs from the bottom floor to the roof, defining the home’s playful shape. The Chimney House is located on the edge of town and it’s designed to blend into the rustic area. The home is clad in traditional dark larch boards , and it draws inspiration from the traditional barns found throughout the area. However, the home’s monolithic shape gives it a strong modern character. Related: Three-storey chimneys funnel geothermal energy into award-winning Perth home A massive chimney with a wooden stove is located in the kitchen, which holds court as the center of the homeowners’ private and social life. The position of the chimney was central to the design, determining the layout of the interior spaces. The interior design is also a mix of old and new, with oiled oak paneling used for almost all of the surfaces. The slanted ceilings , which are covered in reinforced concrete, enhance the playful shape of the home. The large chimney reaches up through the interior to “break open” a linear skylight that runs the length of the roof’s apex, allowing optimal natural light to flood the home. + Dekleva Gregoric Architects Photography by Flavio Coddou

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Timber Chimney House gives farmhouse vernacular a modern twist

How Climate Change is Killing Hundreds of Beloved Endangered Florida Manatees

November 1, 2013 by  
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A staggering number of Florida manatees have died this year, making 2013 the deadliest year yet for these gentle sea giants. In total, 769 manatees have died since January, a number that’s nearly double last year’s death count. According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg , toxic algal blooms and rising global temperatures are largely to blame for the increased mortality rate, which is expected to rise even higher before the year is out. Read the rest of How Climate Change is Killing Hundreds of Beloved Endangered Florida Manatees Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: algae blooms are killing Florida manatees , chemical runoff , endangered Florida manatees , florida fish and wildlife research institute , Florida Manatees , harmful algal blooms , manatee death toll in 2013 , patrick rose , record number of florida manatees killed in 2013 , red tides , save the manatee club , toxic algal blooms        

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How Climate Change is Killing Hundreds of Beloved Endangered Florida Manatees

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