Will iconic red beer pong cups be replaced by aluminum?

September 3, 2019 by  
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Used for decades at family picnics, beach parties and beer pong games, the familiar red plastic SOLO cup might be headed for extinction thanks to a sleek, aluminum alternative that is endlessly reusable . Founded by Leo Hulseman in 1936, the SOLO Cup Co. is facing some fierce competition that is promising to be better for the environment — a reusable, aluminum cup created by Ball Corp., the same company behind the beacon of sustainability that is the mason jar. Related: Coca-Cola to offer Dasani water in aluminum cans and bottles to reduce plastic waste The aluminum cups were recently introduced to some colleges and will soon be tested in other venues. The cups should be available for retail by 2021, John Hayes, CEO of Ball Corp., told Bloomberg . When they do hit the market, expect to pay 25 cents per reusable cup, versus an average 17 cents per disposable SOLO cup. “The aluminum cup is a game-changer for the industry,” Sebastian Siethoff, Ball Corp.’s general manager, told Packaging Digest . “We hope that our customers and consumers view the aluminum cup as a sustainable and easily recyclable alternative to plastic cups, which are currently a mainstay of stadiums, restaurants and beaches and often end up in the trash or on the ground.” As more and more consumers ditch plastic to reduce their carbon footprint, aluminum continues to be a popular choice for cups and cans. Aluminum cans are considered the most sustainable beverage package and are forever recyclable; the average can contains 70 percent recycled metal. Ball Corp. has done its homework and found that 67 percent of U.S. consumers would visit a venue offering aluminum cups more frequently, and they are willing to pay the extra cost for reusable cups. “We think they’re willing to make that choice,” Hayes told Bloomberg. “They know we’ve polluted our world, and they want to do something about it.” Ball Corp. said the cups will be produced in different sizes and can be personalized with designs, logos and more, further enticing consumers to make the switch. + Ball Corp. Via EcoWatch , Packaging Digest and Bloomberg Image via Ball Corp.

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Will iconic red beer pong cups be replaced by aluminum?

Great Barrier Reef outlook decreases from ‘poor’ to ‘very poor’

September 3, 2019 by  
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Conditions at one of the seven natural wonders of the world, Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, is declining, and coral bleaching caused by climate change is to blame. The world’s largest coral reef, where 400 types of coral as well as about 10 percent of the world’s fish live, has gone from “poor” to “very poor.” The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) that manages the reef released a five-year study of the reef and stated, “Significant global action to address climate change is critical to slowing the deterioration of the reef’s ecosystem and heritage values and supporting recovery.” Related: University of Queensland wants to drop “bommies” on the Great Barrier Reef Located off the northeastern Australian coast , the reef is a major tourist attraction, bringing in around AU$5-6 billion (about $3.3-4 billion USD) yearly to the country’s economy. But if things don’t improve, the reef might not be around to enjoy for much longer. While coral bleaching and climate change are the main concerns, the report suggested the 1,400-mile reef has “multiple, cumulative and increasing” problems including run-off from agriculture , coastal land clearing and crown-of-thorns starfish that eat the coral. Another possible factor hindering the reef’s growth could be the increased use of coal mining in Australia. Statistics show that Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions have been on an upward climb for four years and counting. As reported by Deutsche Welle , a 2012 study said that since 1985, the Great Barrier Reef has lost more than half its coral cover. Five years later, the journal Nature said 91 percent had been bleached at least once in the last 20 years. Those concerned by the GBRMPA report have gone as far as asking UNESCO to quash the reef’s standing as a World Heritage site, which could humiliate the Australian government. In early 2019, the government did say it would spend AU$380 million to try and reproduce stronger coral. + Great Barrier Reef Via EcoWatch and Deutsche Welle Image via Robert Linsdell

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Great Barrier Reef outlook decreases from ‘poor’ to ‘very poor’

A third of people in the UK are now eating less or no meat

November 6, 2018 by  
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A new report on food shopping in the U.K. shows that one in eight Britons is now vegetarian or vegan, and another 21 percent identify as flexitarians. This means that about a third of U.K. consumers have deliberately reduced or eliminated meat from their diets, and it underlines a revolution in the eating habits of U.K. citizens. Vegetarians have a diet that eliminates meat, poultry and fish, while vegans eat a plant-based diet and completely avoid all animal products. Flexitarians eat a largely vegetable-based diet and just occasionally supplement it with meat . Related: Look out, meat industry — flexitarianism is on the rise The report comes from the supermarket chain Waitrose, which studied the food choices of Britons across all British supermarket chains. The study shows that people are thinking about how they can individually counter climate change , and avoiding meat and dairy products seems to be the single biggest way that you can reduce your environmental impact on the planet. Waitrose’s report comes from a poll of 2,000 adults who shop a variety of retailers, plus research of millions of transactions in stores and online. The report found the most likely age range to make the switch to veganism is 18 to 34. “It’s extremely encouraging to learn how many Britons are choosing to reduce their consumption of animal products,” Nick Palmer, the head of Compassion in World Farming U.K., told The Guardian . Palmer added that science shows the healthiest diet is plant-heavy, and when you eat less meat, fish, eggs and dairy, you can help animals , people and the planet. The Vegan Society claimed that the number of vegans in the U.K. has increased 400 percent in the last four years, from 150,000 to 600,000. Last May, Waitrose became the first U.K. supermarket to put dedicated vegan sections in its stores, plus it also launched a line of vegan and vegetarian ready-to-eat meals. Vegan dining has also gone mainstream in the U.K., with many chains increasing their non-meat and non-dairy options. Some restaurants have also created menus dedicated to vegans, as more and more people discover just how amazing vegan food can taste. + Waitrose Via The Guardian Image via Mittmac

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A third of people in the UK are now eating less or no meat

The Biggest Pros and Cons of Electric Vehicles

May 3, 2017 by  
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Electric vehicles (EVs) have made huge technological strides since they were first introduced, and they’re more popular than ever before. Yet some drivers are still hesitant to make the switch from traditional gas-powered cars, in large part…

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The Biggest Pros and Cons of Electric Vehicles

INFOGRAPHIC: Why you should stop using peat compost for your garden

December 10, 2014 by  
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Using compost is a great way to give your garden an extra boost, but did you know that certain kinds of compost are linked to environmental destruction? Many of the commercially available compost mixes are made with peat , a finite natural resource that has been mined extensively around the world, leading to the destruction of habitat and the release of carbon emissions. Luckily, there are many peat-free alternatives that are just as beneficial for gardens. Compost Direct developed an infographic that goes over those different types of compost and why it’s so important for gardeners worldwide to make the switch to peat-free composts. Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: Why you should stop using peat compost for your garden Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon emissions , compost , compost direct , environmental destruction , Gardening , gardens , infographic , peat , peat-free , peat-free compost , reader submitted content

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INFOGRAPHIC: Why you should stop using peat compost for your garden

Electronic Health Records Could Cut Carbon Emissions by 1.7 Million Tons

May 4, 2011 by  
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The health care industry is responsible for up to eight percent of our country’s annual CO2 emissions, but a full transition from paper to electronic medical records could take the industry from major emitter to minor emitter.  A new study by Kaiser Permanente found that if electronic health records were implemented across the entire U.S. population, it would reduce CO2 emissions by 1.7 million tons. Kaiser Permanente , along with the rest of the top five medical groups, have created a patient information exchange that uses only electronic medical records, but across the country, adoption of the technology has been low.  On Kaiser’s part, digitizing their records has saved the company 1,044 tons of paper and reduced toxic chemicals from X-ray machine scans by 33.3 tons.  The implementation of virtual doctor-patient visits has saved 92,000 tons of CO2 emissions

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Electronic Health Records Could Cut Carbon Emissions by 1.7 Million Tons

go native.

January 20, 2010 by  
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March is usually the month when the planting season begins, but if the turning of the new year has you feeling ambitious, why not get a jump on the planning while the iron’s still hot?  If your yard is covered in snow right now, you might be thinking of how to rejuvenate your grass once it melts.  If you live in an arid climate, you might be dreaming of a greener spring and summer.  While splendor may be in the grass, it’s an awfully big draw on natural resources. In the West, 60% of consumed water goes to lawns; in the East, 30%.  The fertilizer used to help your grass grow and the pesticide used to keep it free of critters sinks into the soil where it can contaminate groundwater, while the chemicals that don’t sink in just wash off the grass into the street, where they’re carried down storm drains and into the water system.  Yuck!   This year, consider going native.  Planting native species of plants on your property is a great way to save water and money while cutting back on pollution without cutting back on style or beauty.  Some communities, like those serviced by the Southern Nevada Water Authority even offer rebate programs for residents who make the switch. Traditional landscaping requires lots of changes to the natural environment to be hospitable to the non-native plants — it also requires lots of work to keep those plants irrigated, nourished and trimmed.  Naturescaping (also known as xenoscaping), emphasizes selecting the plant that grows naturally at the site. Since native plants evolved to grow under local conditions, they do not require that the site be changed

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go native.

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