Prefab home was assembled onsite in New Zealand in just 4 days

July 23, 2020 by  
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The Karangahake House is nestled within the dense mountain forest of Waitawheta Valley, located on the North Island of New Zealand. The secluded home is built of FSC-certified, native douglas fir wood and paired with an eco-friendly prefabrication construction process. Vast, 360-degree views of neighboring farmlands circle the property, as well as stunning vistas of the Karangahake and Te Aroha Mountains across the historic gold-mining region to the east. The project is meant to provide a sustainable home for its owners, who put great value on the importance of the environment and quiet family moments. Related: Tiny prefab timber cabin in New Zealand designed to be serene art studio The designers made the most out of the local materials available to them, cladding the home in locally grown and sustainably harvested timber with an environmentally friendly, natural wood finish and sustainable insulation. The finish is meant to age over time to reveal a rustic silver hue, paying homage to the nostalgic hiking shelters, or Kiwi Tramper Huts, for which the area is known. At just over 1,000 square feet, the main house features a double-height open living and kitchen area, two double bedrooms and a bathroom under a mezzanine and a connecting room to accommodate guests or transform into office space. The grand “Outdoor Room” alludes to farmhouse style and provides opportunities for indoor-outdoor living, taking in beautiful forest views. This room also serves as an open connection between the main house and guest area. Responsible for the design is MAKE Architects, who collaborated with local partners to create the prefabricated floors, roof and wall panels that helped reduce waste and costs of the construction process. The Karangahake House was assembled onsite in four days by local workers, resulting in nearly 0% onsite waste and a massive reduction of transportation pollution. The FSC-certified wood , natural wood coating and prefab building process will ensure a long lifespan for the property, according to the architects. Additionally, the home will require minimal user maintenance. + MAKE Architects Photography by David Straight via MAKE Architects

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Prefab home was assembled onsite in New Zealand in just 4 days

Conceptual eco-village empowers women in Beirut

July 23, 2020 by  
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In a bid to advance gender equity in Lebanon, Beirut-based Anastasia Elrouss Architects has proposed the Vertical Eco-Village: Urban Lung of Beirut, a three-pronged proposal that centers on the M Tower, a 14-story, greenery-covered tower in the eclectic suburb of Chyah. Designed with a structural concrete shell fitted with recycled wooden partitions, the tower would comprise residences as well as spaces for workshops, retail and agricultural functions on the lower levels. The tower, in conjunction with an off-site wooden pavilion and urban farm, would function as a vocational training and cultural center specifically aimed at empowering Lebanese women through agricultural and self-sustainable skill building. Proposed for a 900-square-meter site at the intersection of two suburban streets, the M Tower emphasizes flexibility and adaptability with open-floor apartment plans that can be uniquely configured by residents into single-floor apartments, duplexes or penthouses with varying amounts of urban gardening space. Pocket gardens and linear terraces wrap around the tower to provide panoramic views of the city and reduce the urban heat island effect. Related: Prefab apartment proposal wants to make city living more sustainable “The building takes on the appearance of a single structural vertical planted element extending the busy city life,” the architects explained. “The intervention is a vertical green landmark revealing a unified structure whose multilayered facades are acting as a protective translucent shell vis-a-vis the street and the surrounding buildings.” For self-sufficiency, the tower would be equipped with photovoltaic panels , solar thermal panels, a rainwater harvesting and storage system and natural underground water storage for irrigation and domestic use. The training and retail facilities, operated by the Warchee NGO, would occupy the lower levels and could include urban farming areas, carpentry workshops, mushroom farming, a vegetable cannery and a vegetable market. The tower’s agricultural production areas would be complemented by the project’s two other satellite locations — Beirut Park’s renovated wooden pavilion and an urban farm — that would be connected to each other via electric shuttle.  + Anastasia Elrouss Architects Images via Anastasia Elrouss Architects

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Conceptual eco-village empowers women in Beirut

Whimsical timber home in England is inspired by oast houses

March 31, 2020 by  
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London-based architectural firm ACME has created a unique home inspired by traditional oast houses used for drying hops as part of the beer brewing process. Surrounded by expansive orchards, the Bumpers Oast House features four rising conical, timber towers, all clad in locally sourced, handcrafted brick tiles. The homeowners of the Bumpers Oast House came close to buying and restoring an old structure when they first came to Kent years ago. Deciding against the idea at the time, they eventually turned to ACME years later to design a new home that would feature a fun, modern twist on the classic architectural style of the area. Related: A circular home in Germany produces biogas for self-sufficiency Placed in a natural setting of orchard trees and lush greenery, the home’s four modules rise out of the ground and become conical at the top. Traditionally, oast houses had open cowls at the very top to let the hot air escape. In the Bumpers Oast House, this idea translated into operational skylights that bring natural light deep into the residence. ACME chose timber as the main building material for its flexibility, resilience and insulating properties. The conical tops of the towers were all manufactured offsite and installed on top of the main bases via crane. For the brick tile cladding, the architects went local, turning to artisans to craft and install the 41,000 tiles that cover the exterior. The exterior features dark red brick tiles at the base that slowly change to a light orange color at the very top of the towers, creating an eye-catching gradient. Inside, the four modules come together to form a very bright and modern dwelling. Clad in plywood, the interior features cylindrical rooms with custom-made, curved furniture. Plentiful windows, plus those gorgeous skylights, brighten the communal areas, including the kitchen, dining and living spaces. Accessible by a helical timber staircase, the second level houses the bedrooms as well as several auxiliary spaces that can be used as offices, playrooms, or guest rooms. Each bedroom features its own private staircase that leads up to the top of its corresponding conical tower, opening up to fun, treehouse -like spaces that overlook the green landscape. + ACME Via ArchDaily Photography by Jim Stephenson via ACME

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Whimsical timber home in England is inspired by oast houses

This modular, shipping container home was completed in 2 months

February 3, 2020 by  
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Completed in March 2019, this modular home in the East Hampton town of Amagansett, Long Island encompasses a kitchen, four bedrooms and three bathrooms within 1,800 square feet of living space. Four repurposed 40-by-8 -foot shipping containers were used to construct the main part of the structure, two placed side-by-side and two more stacked on top. The inside was then carved out to create a larger interior space. The whole building was installed in two days and fully completed in two months. New York-based architecture firm MB Architecture is responsible for the project. The proposed site was a triangular, wooded corner lot on high ground that the clients hoped to turn into a summer and year-round weekend home with a large outdoor space and enough room for a pool and a lawn. Although the building site was restrictive, its high elevation provided beautiful views and plenty of natural light. Related: This container home in Brazil helps its residents disconnect In addition to the limited construction site, the clients were also set on sticking to a strict budget, which, after examination, proved to be much lower than the original projected costs. The shipping container method presented the perfect solution, significantly lowering the costs of construction while offering a unique design strategy. MB Architecture proposed prefabricating the building off-site and lowering the cost of transportation and materials by using the shipping containers.  The designers installed a wide staircase, which took up the width of a single shipping container , and extended the high living room ceiling to create a landing area that faces the backyard. Floor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall windows were added to take advantage of the natural sunlight and provide breathtaking views of the sunset and spacious outdoor area. An additional shipping container guest house consisting of two bedrooms was strategically placed away from the main structure to create a courtyard in between the two buildings, making the property feel larger. + MB Architecture Via AN Interior Photography by Matthew Carbone via MB Architecture

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This modular, shipping container home was completed in 2 months

Cross-laminated timber makes this Scottish home climate resistant

January 20, 2020 by  
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Scottish firm Mary Arnold Foster Architects has unveiled a stunning home made out of several timber “pods” and tucked into the idyllic landscape of the Scottish Highlands. Clad in cross-laminated timber ( CLT ) and covered with slats of charred larch, which provide the home with resilience, the Nedd home was built on concrete pillars and set in between two outcrops to minimize damage to the landscape. Located in the remote village of Nedd in the western region of the Scottish Highlands, the eponymous home design was constructed using CLT and covered in burnt larch to give the structure longevity and sufficient durability to stand up to the harsh mountainous climate . Additionally, the charred wood provides the home with an airtight envelope which enables the interior to require very little heating. In fact, a wood-burning stove usually meets most of the home’s heating needs. Related: Waterstudio unveils the world’s first floating timber tower Made up of connected timber cubes , the Nedd House is divided into three separate volumes. One area houses the central living room, while the remaining cubes house an en-suite master bedroom and a guest bedroom. All three sections are linked by a single corridor, which leads to an ultra-large north-facing window that connects the interior spaces with the  idyllic surroundings . According to the architect, the home design was inspired by the area’s breathtaking views. “I wanted to avoid a wall of glass but instead to frame the large view in two key rooms; the living space and the main bedroom, partly due to the topography of the site,” Arnold-Forster explained. “The other windows frame views of the rocks, heather and grasses.” Contrasting with the dark hue of the exterior, the interior of the home is light and airy thanks to the pale timber walls and ceilings found throughout. Within the main living area, floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors provide direct access to an open-air deck that looks out over the landscape. + Mary Arnold Foster Architects Via Dezeen Photography by David Barbour Photography

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Cross-laminated timber makes this Scottish home climate resistant

Cedar Haven is a forest retreat made with reclaimed logs

December 3, 2019 by  
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Blending contemporary design with natural materials, Washington-based residential architecture firm Gelotte Hommas Drivdahl Architecture completed a stunning timber home that feels like an extension of its alpine forest environment. Created for a homeowner who wanted a residence that echoed the tranquility of its mountain surroundings, the aptly named Cedar Haven was built mainly from timber and stone — much of which was reclaimed from the site itself. Several salvaged logs and other found objects from the surroundings were deliberately left in their natural state to emphasize the organic beauty of the design. Located on a site where a previous log home once stood, Cedar Haven was created in response to the client’s desire for a more contemporary house that still exuded the warm, rustic feel of a traditional log cabin . The result is a stunning, custom home that features a dramatic, light-filled great room with a massive stone fireplace, a sculptural spiral staircase and custom, handcrafted details throughout. The natural materials palette and large windows — particularly those in the double-height great room — blur the boundary between indoors and out. Related: A traditional log cabin in Colorado is the perfect winter wonderland retreat “The Cedar Haven project draws inspiration from the surrounding natural beauty,” the architects explained in a project statement. “Inside, vertical lines and artful asymmetry mimic the forest outside the soaring great room window. A staircase of spiraling posts echoes a grove of trees , and a colorful petrified stump captures the attention of all who enter.” In addition to the petrified stump, reclaimed wood is used for statement design pieces in the home. Cedar trunks act as eye-catching pillars inside and outside of the house, while a twisted tree trunk frames one of the three stone fireplaces. Reclaimed stones were also used to build the fireplaces and chimneys. + Gelotte Hommas Drivdahl Architecture Photography by Benjamin Benschneider via Gelotte Hommas Drivdahl Architecture

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Cedar Haven is a forest retreat made with reclaimed logs

Saul Griffith on the Green New Deal and the enormous opportunity in shooting for the moon

November 6, 2019 by  
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On the main stage of VERGE 19, Saul Griffith argues that the conversation about a Green New Deal is bold, timely and necessary.

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Saul Griffith on the Green New Deal and the enormous opportunity in shooting for the moon

Accelerate at Circularity 19: Fast-Pitch Competition: r.cup

July 19, 2019 by  
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Accelerate at Circularity 19 is a fast-pitch competition featuring entrepreneurs with innovative technologies, products and services advancing a circular economy. r.cup’s Michael Martin pitches from the main stage.

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Accelerate at Circularity 19: Fast-Pitch Competition: r.cup

Accelerate at Circularity 19: Fast-Pitch Competition: GIBBON

July 17, 2019 by  
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Accelerate at Circularity 19 is a fast-pitch competition featuring entrepreneurs with innovative technologies, products and services advancing a circular economy. GIBBON’s Joanna Chen pitches from the main stage.

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Accelerate at Circularity 19: Fast-Pitch Competition: GIBBON

Accelerate at Circularity 19: Fast-Pitch Competition: Revolv

July 15, 2019 by  
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Accelerate at Circularity 19 is a fast-pitch competition featuring entrepreneurs with innovative technologies, products and services advancing a circular economy. Revolv’s Forrest Carroll pitches from the main stage.

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Accelerate at Circularity 19: Fast-Pitch Competition: Revolv

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