How will Los Angeles’ 2028 Olympics impact the environment?

October 13, 2021 by  
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Hosting the Olympics is a huge honor for cities. At the same time, it’s an expensive burden. As  Los Angeles  plans for its summer 2028 games, many people say the event will be neither as sustainable or equitable as city leaders have promised. Mayor Eric Garcetti has said the games — with an estimated $7 billion price tag — will have “no impact” on L.A., neither damaging the environment nor adding debt. Part of the way he plans to accomplish this is a no-build policy that would repurpose existing structures rather than creating new stadiums. This would prevent residential displacement, limit environmental impact and save money. Most  Olympic  host cities build like crazy. Related: Those Olympic anti-sex beds? They’re actually for recycling. However, local activists have noted sneaky ways of getting around the no-build pledge. Over the last five years, three new sports facilities have been approved, two of which have already been completed. Worth $8.5 billion, these facilities will be used during the Olympics. The workaround? Most of the  construction  took place in Inglewood, not Los Angeles itself. And the stadiums are privately owned. Inglewood activists are drawing attention to  environmental racism . The majority Black and brown community is already stuck between the world’s fourth busiest airport and L.A. County’s second-biggest oil field, plus a couple of extremely busy freeways. Add in the construction noise, increased traffic and accompanying air pollution of creating major sports facilities, and Inglewood residents have had about enough. “There is a deliberate effort to unravel and dismantle our community for economic profits because they don’t see the land and the people living here as worth anything,” said Alexis Aceves, a member of the Lennox-Inglewood Tenants Union (LITU), as reported by Grist. “They’re trying to act like they just lucked upon already active construction, but there was no way this wasn’t planned.” The LITU has been warning Los Angeles that the 2028 Olympic games will further deteriorate the built and natural environment of Inglewood. Via Grist Lead image via Pexels

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How will Los Angeles’ 2028 Olympics impact the environment?

TikTok star Joanne Molinaro launches "The Korean Vegan" cookbook

October 13, 2021 by  
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Joanne Lee Molinaro is a trial lawyer, marathon runner and TikTok sensation as @thekoreanvegan. The Chicagoan took time out of her busy schedule to talk about her debut cookbook/memoir “The Korean Vegan” released on Tuesday, Oct. 12. Here’s what she had to say about being one of the best-known Korean vegans. Buy “The Korean Vegan” on Amazon Inhabitat: How did you decide to adopt a plant-based diet? Molinaro: I decided to adopt a plant-based diet at the suggestion of my then boyfriend (now husband). At his urging, I watched a lot of movies and read a lot of books about the impact animal agriculture had on health and climate change and grew more open to the idea of going plant-based. I also worried that if I didn’t join him in this change in diet that it would inject a complication into a fairly nascent relationship.  Accordingly, I decided to give it a try on a probationary basis.  Ultimately, it ended up being far easier than I expected. Also during that time, my father grew ill with prostate cancer , and given what I’d read in my research regarding the link between the consumption of red meat and cancer, I felt it best that I discontinue eating meat permanently. Related: Cooking inspiration from vegan recipes all over the world Inhabitat: How did your Korean-American family and friends respond to that decision? Molinaro: Many of them were skeptical or simply confused by the decision.  Some of them said, “But how can you be vegan? You’re Korean!” Lots of people — including Korean Americans — believe that Korean food is very meat-centric (think Korean BBQ) and, therefore, Korean people can’t be vegan. My family simply assumed that I was just trying to lose weight (and, to be honest, the thought did cross my mind at the time, even though weight loss no longer has anything to do with why I’m vegan). Now, though, I believe both my family and friends have seen just how much closer to my heritage going vegan has brought me and that it’s far more than a diet to me. Inhabitat:  Which traditional Korean dishes lend themselves especially well to a vegan interpretation? Molinaro: There’s a whole segment of Korean cuisine that is already largely plant based — Buddhist Temple Cuisine. Prepared by Korean Buddhist nuns, the food is consistent with the philosophy of “do as little harm as possible.” As such, the nuns avoid using animal products when cooking (e.g. they do not use fish sauce when fermenting kimchi).  While the ingredients are often thought of as “humble” because they do not incorporate meat (which still symbolizes wealth in Korea), in fact, many of these dishes come straight out of the kitchens of Korean courtesans — women who served in the Korean palaces often remained unmarried for their tenure and retired to Buddhist temples, where they then shared their knowledge of palace cuisine. It’s no wonder that entirely plant-based restaurants in Korea are now Michelin rated eateries — the food is stunning, flavorful and totally vegan. Otherwise, many of the banchan (or side dishes) lend themselves well to being “veganized.” Most banchan highlight pickled or seasoned vegetables and, often times, all you have to do is remove the fish sauce to render them completely plant based. A good example of this is kimchi.  Inhabitat: Any Korean dishes that were really hard to veganize?  Molinaro: The hardest thing I’ve had to veganize thus far is a good broth. Many Korean stews start out with a very rich pork or beef broth. Developing a vegetable broth that could provide the same kind of complexity and depth was challenging, but my upcoming cookbook includes a vegetable broth that is excellent. I’m quite proud of it! Inhabitat: What do you think is special about Korean food? Molinaro: I think banchan is what makes Korean food so unique. There are usually anywhere from 10 to 20 of these small dishes on a Korean dining table at dinner . Sometimes referred to as “garnishes,” the role of banchan is truly to maximize each mouthful of food (i.e. the perfect bite). Korean food teaches the palate to appreciate a combination of flavors and textures, how they interplay and enhance each other.  For example, instead of simply focusing on your protein , moving to your carbs and then nibbling on your salad. Each spoonful is an opportunity to craft a mouthwatering mosaic of complementary tastes that might include a little rice, some protein, a sliver of some pickled vegetable, all followed by a piping hot spoonful of soybean stew — salty, tart, soft, crunchy, hot and cold all come together to form a unique blend of deliciousness. Inhabitat: Tell us a little bit about your new cookbook. Molinaro: My new cookbook is designed to live up to the aphorism: “Love my food? Love my people.” I want people to see how varied Korean cuisine is — it’s not just Korean BBQ.  I also want them to see how easy it is to infuse flavors from your childhood into new plant-based favorites so that you can always retain that connection to your heritage and culture. Finally, I want people to fall in love with my family — the people behind my food. Inhabitat: What are the pros and cons to being a famous vegan on social media? Molinaro: I totally don’t think I’m famous! Believe me — my husband and dog, Rudy, would disabuse me of such a notion pretty quickly! That said, having a large social media following as a vegan, does give me access to an incredible community of plant-based individuals who share so many of the same values as I do — whether it’s a love of animals , a sense of stewardship over the planet or mindful eating in general. I am so grateful to the plant-based community for their vocal and sometimes protective support of my work. Unfortunately, on the flip side of that coin is that my large following subjects me to the trolls — those who think veganism is “unnatural.” Luckily, I don’t get much of that though! Inhabitat: What else would you like readers to know about you?  Molinaro: I used to be addicted to video games and can still go toe-to-toe with the best in Mario Kart! Inhabitat: Would you share a recipe with us? Molinaro: Sure! One of my favorite recipes in the book is the Pecan Paht Pie. It’s perfect for the upcoming holidays and it’s requested by my totally non-vegan family every year! PECAN PAHT ( ????? • Sweet Red Bean) PIE Serves 8-10 Difficulty: Medium Allergens: GFO One Thanksgiving I decided I wanted to make pecan pie that my family would actually eat. We’re not fans of overly sweet desserts, but my father absolutely loves pecans. The answer to creating a less cloyingly sweet filling was simple — paht! Not only is the red bean paste far less sugar-y than the typical custard-like filling of a traditional pecan pie, I knew my family would instantly appreciate the familiar flavor. I presented my little pie that Thanksgiving, and since then I have been asked to make it every year. For the pie crust: 1½ cups (210 grams) all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon salt ? cup (152 grams) cold vegan butter, cut into ½-inch cubes 3 to 4 tablespoons ice water For the pie filling and topping : ¾ cup (300 grams) brown rice syrup 6 tablespoons soy or oat milk 1 cup (320 grams) paht ¼ cup (50 grams) light brown sugar 4 tablespoons (57 grams) vegan butter, melted and cooled ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups (220 gram) chopped pecans 3½ tablespoons (35 gram) potato starch 1 cup (110 gram) pecan halves Steps: 1. Make the pie crust: In a food processor, combine the flour, sugar and salt and pulse while adding the butter, a few pieces at a time. Add the ice water, one tablespoon at a time, until a dough starts to form. 2. Shape the dough into a ball. Do not handle more than necessary. Wrap with plastic and refrigerate for at least four hours, but best if overnight. 3. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 4. Make the pie filling and topping: In a medium bowl, combine the brown rice syrup, soy milk, paht, brown sugar, melted butter, salt , vanilla, chopped pecans and potato starch. 5. Place the pie dough between two sheets of parchment paper. Using a rolling pin, roll out the pie dough gently until it is large enough to line a nine-inch pie pan. Ease the crust into the pan and trim any excess dough at the edges with kitchen shears or a sharp paring knife. Pour in the filling. Top the filling with pecan halves. 6. Transfer the pie to the oven and bake until the pie filling sets (i.e. doesn’t jiggle too much), one hour to one hour 15 minutes. Cool the pie on a wire rack for two hours before serving. Via “The Korean Vegan Cookbook” Images via The Korean Vegan When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn commissions at no cost to you.

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TikTok star Joanne Molinaro launches "The Korean Vegan" cookbook

Why Los Angeles has started to paint its streets white

August 22, 2017 by  
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Though it lacks the humidity of East Coast heat, Los Angeles still burns. The City of Angels is one of the only places in the United States where heat-related deaths occur regularly during winter. This public health hazard is only expected to worsen as climate change gains strength over the next decades. Located in a desert valley and dominated by asphalt roads to facilitate its car culture, LA is extremely vulnerable – and, fortunately, innovative. The sprawling cityscape of nearly 4 million people (over 13 million in the metro area) has begun to paint its streets white, in hopes of using the color’s natural heat-reflecting properties to lower the temperature and make LA a healthier place to live. Los Angeles, and many other cities around the world, suffer from what is called the urban heat island effect, in which the dense infrastructure and activity of the city generates and traps heat beyond what might normally be expected based on the region’s climate . To combat this effect, Los Angeles is covering its streets with CoolSeal, a light-colored paint that has already yielded positive outcomes. “We found that on average the area covered in CoolSeal is 10 degrees cooler than black asphalt on the same parking lot,” said Greg Spotts, the assistant director of the Bureau of Street Services for San Fernando Valley, one of the hottest spots in Greater LA. Related: Restorative Healing Gardens take over a concrete garage rooftop in L.A. LA officials hope that cooler streets will result in cooler homes, which in turn keeps energy costs and health risks low. “Not everyone has the resources to use air conditioning, so there’s concern that some low-income families will suffer” if something is not done to counteract the rising heat, said Alan Barreca, an environmental science professor at the University of California at Los Angeles. “The [cool-treated] pavement would provide benefits to everyone.” The coating, which costs $40,000 per mile and lasts for seven years, will be applied to streets in a pilot program before it is applied citywide. Its future looks bright. “We’ve done things over and over again that people said couldn’t be done,” Spotts said, “and this time is no different.” Via Washington Post Images via  Giuseppe Milo/Flickr (1)

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Why Los Angeles has started to paint its streets white

Richard Branson’s new supersonic jet will fly 2X faster than the speed of sound

May 12, 2017 by  
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Would you like to travel between New York City and London in just 3 hours and 15 minutes? In a few years, that could be possible. Richard Branson of Virgin Galactic and startup Boom Technology have partnered to build a supersonic aircraft capable of zipping through the skies faster than the speed of sound. Live Science reports that the passenger aircraft would be capable of traveling through the skies faster than the Concorde jet or any other commercial aircraft today. The plane won’t be the first aircraft to fly faster than the speed of sound, but it will be the first modern, supersonic passenger jet that travels at Mach 2.2. In case you’re wondering, that is twice the speed of sound, or 1,451 mph (2,335 km/h). The now-retired Concorde was capable of flying at speeds of about 1,350 mph (2,180 km/h). At Mach 2.2, passengers could travel between San Francisco and Tokyo in 5.5 hours, or between Los Angeles and Sydney in less than 6 hours and 45 minutes. In a blog post , CEO and founder of Boom Technology Blake Scholl said that one of the startup’s goals is to set a new speed record for civil aircraft. “Building a supersonic airplane is not easy — but it is important,” Scholl wrote. “While we love the hard engineering and technical challenges, what really drives us is the enormous human benefit of faster travel . Related: Sir Richard Branson urges prime minister David Cameron to back renewable energy Reportedly, Scholl is most excited about the positive implications supersonic commercial travel may bring, as it will make the farthest regions of the planet more accessible. “Imagine traveling across the Atlantic [Ocean], getting business done [in Europe] and being home to tuck your children into bed,” Scholl wrote, “or saving two whole days of a typical round-trip itinerary to Asia. … When time is no longer a limit, where will you vacation? Where will you do business?” Having raised $33 million in funding to develop the startup’s first supersonic passenger jet , the company will begin constructing the “Baby Boom” prototype. Then, a prototype of the eventual full-size Boom aircraft, which will carry 55 passengers in all-business-class configuration, will be built. Air Transport World (ATW) reports that the Baby Boom’s first test flight is scheduled for 2018, and the full-size Boom for 2020. Certification from the Federal Aviation Administration is expected to follow shortly afterward. Via Live Science Images via FighterSweep , Forbes

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Ford introduces the first-ever hybrid police car

April 28, 2017 by  
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When you think of police cars, visions of large, powerful and gas-hungry vehicles probably come to mind. Well, that vision of the “dirty” police car may change forever with Ford’s first-ever hybrid police car: meet the Ford Police Responder Hybrid Sedan. Ford currently more police vehicles in the United States than any other car-maker, with 63 percent market share. The Police Responder Hybrid Sedan is expected help cities’ Police departments decrease emissions and save fuel. The hybrid sedan is rated at an EPA-estimated combined gas mileage of 38 mpg – more than twice that of today’s Police Interceptor. The Police Responder Hybrid Sedan is powered by an Atkinson-cycle 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine with an electric motor and a lithium-ion battery. The hybrid is calibrated for law enforcement’s unique duty cycle and will run in battery-only mode up to 60 mph. Related: Beijing creates new environmental police force to crack down on smog Police vehicles spend lots of time idling, so the the Police Responder Hybrid Sedan’s lithium-ion battery helps power the high electrical loads of the police vehicle, reducing engine run time and saving an estimated 0.27 gallons of fuel per hour. Ford estimates that Police Responder Hybrid Sedan customers could see nearly $3,900 a year in potential fuel savings per vehicle relative to the Police Interceptor. The Ford Police Responder Hybrid Sedan is making its debut in Los Angeles and New York, but Ford hopes to start delivering them nationwide by next summer. + Ford Images @Ford

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Denmark to end subsidies for renewables much sooner than anyone thought possible

April 28, 2017 by  
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The renewable energy industry is performing extremely well in Denmark . The country’s energy minister Lars Christian Lilleholt said it’s performing so well, they’ll be able to stop providing state support for clean energy providers in just a few years. Denmark’s renewable energy industry will be able to stand on its own, and Lilleholt said he could not have predicted this outcome even last year. Denmark’s renewable energy industry needed subsidies for over 40 years. But soon they’ll be able to survive without a boost from the government. According to Lilleholt, the country’s experience shows it’s no longer cheaper to produce coal than renewables. The milestone is even more crucial right as the direction of global energy policies is uncertain while United States President Donald Trump embarks on an ill-advised attempt to revive coal . According to Bloomberg, the president has “made clear he’s an enemy of wind power .” Related: Denmark just broke its own wind power record for the second year in a row Lilleholt said technology will help clean energy become even more efficient and said “already today, it’s impossible to build a new coal power plant without support.” A government-appointed panel gave him the findings on the energy future of Denmark, and said the country is set to meet power needs entirely with renewable energy by 2050. Half the country’s energy requirement could be supplied by renewables as soon as 2030. The panel thinks a large amount of new capacity will be constructed without subsidies. Industry members seem just as surprised as Lilleholt. Outgoing CEO of engineering firm Danfoss Niels B. Christiansen thinks the price of producing renewable energy could fall below market electricity prices between 2020 and 2030, saying, “A year ago, it was debatable whether renewable energy costs could drop so low. But everyone’s now thinking that it will probably happen sooner.” Denmark is home to both the world’s largest wind turbine manufacturer and world’s largest offshore wind farm operator, Vestas Wind Systems A/S and Dong Energy A/S . Via Bloomberg Images via Wikimedia Commons and courtesy of Vestas Wind Systems A/S

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Scientists create super-strong bricks from mars-like soil

April 28, 2017 by  
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Future Mars dwellers may actually be able to use locally-sourced materials for their buildings. Four University of California, San Diego engineers were able to press Mars-like dirt into bricks in a study funded by NASA . No other materials were necessary to keep the blocks together. And the bricks were incredibly tough – even more than steel-reinforced concrete . A high-pressure hammer helped the engineers pack dirt – with the same chemical composition and grain size and shape as soil on Mars – into strong bricks. Since storage will be limited on any craft carrying astronauts to Mars, they may be able to devote room to other equipment if they know they can construct habitats with the red planet’s resources. Related: Scientists use Martian dust to 3D print tools On Earth we typically have to employ some type of adhesive to keep construction materials together. But simulated Mars dirt actually has a chemical ingredient that helps bind it. Structural engineer Yu Qiao told The Verge the chemical ingredient “gives the soil strength when it’s compacted.” It may be feasible for humans to hammer out bricks on the red planet as well. NASA life sciences expert Jon Rask, not part of the study, told The Verge, “It’s really easy to swing a hammer on Mars. You can imagine a Mars explorer swinging a hammer to make strong building blocks.” The team worked with lunar soil in the past, when NASA aimed to go back to the moon . Lunar dirt requires a binder, but since the binder would have to be shipped from Earth, the team worked with the lunar dirt until they were able to take the binder content below the 15 percent construction materials on Earth generally require to just three percent. When NASA shifted its focus to Mars, the team did too, and decided to test their lunar dirt findings on Mars dirt. They first tried packing the dirt into blocks with six percent binder, and when that worked well, they decided to test the Martian dirt further and discovered it necessitated no binder whatsoever. The journal Scientific Reports published the engineers’ findings online yesterday. Via The Verge Images via the University of California, San Diego

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Scientists create super-strong bricks from mars-like soil

6 impressive structures built around living trees

February 28, 2017 by  
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Treehouses hold a special magic. They hint at escape, and an opportunity to transcend the busyness of life; connect with nature. An example of man-made structures that harmonize with the environment , treehouses have inspired architects and designers around the world to build homes and offices that do the same. We’ve rounded up six examples of architecture influenced by treehouse design: four homes , one office, and one tearoom. All are designed around living trees , allowing inhabitants to breathe easy surrounded by greenery. Uncle’s House by 3 Atelier The living area of this light-filled home in Vietnam centers around a flourishing tree that is large enough for children to climb. The architects at 3 Atelier built this home for their uncle and his family, using materials reminiscent of the parents’ childhood homes. Not only does Uncle’s House inspire kids to engage with nature, they can even grow vegetables in the dirt around its base. Related: Snøhetta’s luxury cabin with Aurora Borealis views opens at Treehotel Inside Out House by Takeshi Hosaka One tree wouldn’t suffice for the Inside Out House by Takeshi Hosaka in Tokyo, Japan . From the outside, the cubic home is simple and modern. Inside, multiple trees and plants bring the outdoors inside. Sliding glass doors offer flexibility, and natural light permeates the home through skylights , creating a serene sanctuary in which humans and cats coexist. Symbiosis office by Cong Sinh Architects New developments are increasingly crowding out green spaces in the southern part of Hue, Vietnam. So Cong Sinh Architects designed Symbiosis, a peaceful office rooted in the environment in the midst of the bustling city . Expansive windows on both floors of the office overlook a green oasis full of vines and a tree. The shade from the greenery even helps regulate the office temperature. Tree House by A. Masow Design Studio A. Masow Design Studio unveiled astounding plans for the ultimate treehouse: an entire tree wrapped in a glass facade in Kazakhstan . A spiral staircase would allow the owner to move between four levels, circumnavigating the tree as they moved from floor to floor. The glass allows natural light to stream in and provides an unobstructed view of the surrounding woods. House in the Trees by Anonymous Architects This cantilevered Echo Park home takes the treehouse concept to new heights. House in the Trees by Anonymous Architects rests on a hillside overlooking Los Angeles , and was carefully constructed so as not to harm neighboring mature cypress trees, one of which extends through a bedroom in the home. Fire-treated Western red cedar siding, reclaimed chestnut floors, and walnut cabinetry add to the woodsy , natural feel of the cozy California dwelling. Bird’s Nest Atami by Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP A 300-year-old camphor tree in Japan now includes a tiny teahouse nestled among its branches. Bird’s Nest Atami, designed by Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP with the help of Takashi Kobayashi , is part of the country’s largest treehouse. Inspired by how crows utilize coat hangers in nests , Nakamura designed the freestanding teahouse to rest among the 22-meter-tall tree on light structural elements without harming the tree. The earthy interior also includes wood furnishings, inviting tea drinkers to relax in nature . Images via Quang Dam , © Koji Fujii by Nacasa & Partners Inc., Hiroyuki Oki , A. Masow Design Studio , Anonymous Architects , and Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP , by Koji Fujii/Nacasa and Partners Inc.

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Affordable housing for disabled veterans marries wellness and sustainability in Los Angeles

January 17, 2017 by  
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Great architecture goes beyond building four walls—it’s about empowering individuals and building communities. That philosophy is embodied in the 2017 AIA award-winning project, Six Affordable Veteran Housing. Designed by Brooks + Scarpa , this beautiful LEED Platinum-certified project offers support services, rehab, and affordable housing to disabled veterans in Los Angeles’ MacArthur Park, an area with one of the highest population densities in the U.S. Unlike traditional shelter models, Six Affordable Veteran Housing was designed primarily around the concept of community by prioritizing large public areas over private spaces. The 42,500-square-foot complex is the first Skid Row Housing Trust project built outside of downtown Los Angeles and takes inspiration from the military term “I’ve got your six,” a phrase that refers to having someone’s back. “The organization of the space is intended to transform the way people live-away from a reclusive, isolating layout towards a community-oriented, interactive space,” say the architects. The SIX comprises 57 units of high-quality sustainable and affordable housing in a neighborhood that’s highly walkable, particularly to service-industry employers, but is typically out of the price range for disabled veterans. The units are stacked into four levels and each has balconies wrapped with a recycled wood screen overlooking the central courtyard. Every unit features ten-foot-high ceilings and large, strategically placed windows that let in ample natural light and cross ventilation. Related: Seattle teens build mobile tiny homes for local homeless community The project’s energy efficient design also sets the facility apart from most conventionally developed projects. The LEED Platinum -certified SIX was constructed using passive design strategies to optimize building performance, such as orienting the building for exposure to prevailing winds and adding windows that maximize day lighting. Concrete floors and walls double as thermal heat sinks, while double-glazed low-E windows minimize heat loss and gain. A large green roof and edible garden top the building and can be seen from below. + Brooks + Scarpa Images by Tara Wujcik

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Affordable housing for disabled veterans marries wellness and sustainability in Los Angeles

UK architect helps locals rebuild Nepal temple destroyed by earthquake

January 17, 2017 by  
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The 7.8 magnitude earthquake that battered Nepal in 2015 damaged 100 homes, killed three people, and devastated what many consider to be the country’s oldest Hindu temple in Changu Village alone. Slowly locals are rebuilding their beloved Changu Narayan temple with help from a British architect, who also helped restore Angkor Wat in Cambodia through the World Monuments Fund . Locals say the Hindu god Vishnu once appeared at Changu Narayan, the fifth century temple dedicated to the deity. Only priests ever entered the intricately carved wooden structure before the earthquake. When locals witnessed the devastation inflicted on the World Heritage Site by the natural disaster, they felt their lives had ended. But they didn’t give up hope, and began to rebuild. 61-year-old Gyan Bahadur Bhadal, who is one of a group of villagers maintaining the temple, told The Associated Press (AP), “I see now our world coming back alive.” Related: Shigeru Ban will reuse earthquake rubble to build Nepal relief shelters Architect John Sanday has loved Changu Narayan for decades, and told the AP he was very emotional visiting the site after the devastating earthquake, which damaged 600 historical monuments, palaces, and temples in Nepal. Out of those 600, Sanday decided he’d take on the temple as a project, and became a technical adviser for locals. He told the AP, “Sure, it’s peanuts, a little temple, so why is it so special? The detail. The grace. It’s one of the few World Heritage Sites that hasn’t been completely destroyed by development.” So far locals have painstakingly cleaned and made some repairs to the temple, but there’s still work to be done. The community needs to raise around $300,000 to complete the restoration initiative. Inspired by locals’ dedication, Sanday has already helped rebuild a guardhouse-sized shrine. Now he’s looking beyond the shrine to the temple, convinced the ancient building can be saved. Via The Associated Press Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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