This breathtaking Tulum art gallery was created by Peggy Guggenheim’s great-grandson

May 4, 2018 by  
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Much like the Guggenheim Museums around the world, a new art gallery founded by the great-grandson of Peggy Guggenheim is a true architectural showstopper. Santiago Rumney Guggenheim commissioned designer Jorge Eduardo Neira Sterkel to create IK LAB , a stunning arts gallery that opened late last month in Tulum, Mexico. Topped with a curved timber canopy, the nature-inspired space is located within the eco-friendly Azulik resort. Upon entering, visitors are asked to slip off their shoes and “to interact with the floor as a living organism,” made from woven jungle vines that seamlessly flow into walls and ceilings made with smooth curved concrete and locally sourced wood. No trees were cut in the process of building and the organic structure is lifted off the ground to minimize site impact. Natural light filters into the building through spaced-out timber elements and large openings in the walls reinforced by transparent fiberglass . In addition to framed views of the jungle outside, plants grow inside the art gallery as well. Related: World’s first porcelain courtyard opens at London’s V&A Museum “This majestic space redefines the traditional white-cube, gallery-visiting experience, instead fortifying the organic relationship between art and its physical surroundings,” IK LAB said in a statement. The inaugural exhibition, curated by Santiago R. Guggenheim, is titled “Alignments.” It features works by Tatiana Trouvé, Artur Lescher and Margo Trushina. + IK LAB Via Dezeen Images by Fernando Artigas

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This breathtaking Tulum art gallery was created by Peggy Guggenheim’s great-grandson

Beautiful cedar-clad Bridge House crosses a ravine in Ontario

February 27, 2018 by  
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This elegant  timber house bridges a ravine near the shores of Mary Lake in Port Sydney, Ontario. Architecture firm LLAMA urban design created the inspiring home to have minimal impact on the landscape and to celebrate the beauty of the surrounding environment. The house is located two hours north of Toronto , and it sits across the steepest part of a wide ravine. Its overall length – 124 feet – creates a strong linear gesture that allows the residents to immerse themselves in the surrounding landscape. The home is held aloft by an inverted V–shaped glulam structure, and the architects used locally sourced wood and unstained cedar siding for the exterior cladding. Related: This Iowa home built across a ravine is heated and cooled by the earth The main façade of the house faces the lake and creates a feeling of being among treetops. The second façade faces the forest and features expansive transparent surfaces. An inverted V–shaped Glulam structure holds up the house and connects the interior social area with the roof deck. + LLAMA urban design Via Archdaily Photos by A-Frame studio/ Ben Rahn

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Beautiful cedar-clad Bridge House crosses a ravine in Ontario

New green school in Kibera slum replaces original started by concerned Kenyan mothers

September 28, 2017 by  
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A group of concerned mothers started the Anwa primary school in Kibera, Kenya , where extremely disadvantaged children previously lacked access to education. Over time, the school has grown in attendance and needed a new facility that would replace the original 2-story ramshackle building. Kounkuey Design Initiative (KDI) designed the new main building in close collaboration with the school community as a model for sustainable, context-based design. The architects used sustainably-sourced and certified timber framing, wattle and daub mud-walls on the ground floor and mabati (steel) sheeting on the first floor. This references traditional Kibera construction techniques while reflecting a connection with the local identity. Related: Mobile school “walking classrooms” are helping change lives in Kenya KDI carpentry trainees built the doors and windows using bamboo and timber. All materials used were locally-sourced, while the techniques and building methods were transferable to the local community. The next phase in the project will focus on creating a suitable access to the upper storey and a sustainable landscape for the school grounds. The design firm issued a statement: “At KDI, we co-design and build what we call Productive Public Spaces (PPS) – formerly underutilized, unsafe or polluted sites that are transformed into active, attractive community hubs.” + Kounkuey Design Initiative (KDI)

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New green school in Kibera slum replaces original started by concerned Kenyan mothers

Green makeover transforms cedar-clad Virginia house into a lifelong retreat

January 26, 2017 by  
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A few easy steps has transformed a normal Virginia home into a charming, lifelong retreat. A couple approaching retirement commissioned Thrive Architecture to renovate their Hickory House into an accessible home that uses less energy than it did before. The architects expanded the existing space to include a living room, bedroom, bathroom, dressing room and laundry, all organized on a single story. The main sitting area offers views of the surrounding forest. Related: Gorgeous cedar-clad house boasts stunning mountain views in Canada Three types locally-sourced hardwoods were used for the interior, including Hickory. This choice of materials complements the exterior cladding, dominated by ship-lapped oiled cedar . To make the house more energy efficient, the team added air-tight spray foam insulation, LED lighting and low-flow plumbing fixtures. + Thrive Architecture Photos by Ansel Olson

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Abandoned alleyway in Beijing reinvented as a stunning private courtyard

January 19, 2017 by  
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This is one of the most impressive renovations to ever cross our desk. Beijing-based architects  META – Project worked absolute magic on an abandoned alleyway , turning the bleak space into a multi-use entertainment area for the nature-loving homeowner. Once a long-forgotten hutong, Courtyard by the West Sea is now an open “extraverted” space that is a perfect spot for enjoying both peaceful solitude and lively family gatherings. The owner of the home asked the architects to design an open-air space that could accommodate a variety of uses, including a tea house and entertainment space. Using the local custom of “meandering in the hutongs” as inspiration, the team began to recreate the space as a private, but welcoming courtyard . Related: Fortress-like house in Portugal hides a surprising light-filled courtyard inside The original site was quite narrow, but the architects opened the width by removing a temporary structure to the east and in the middle of the space. Inspired by the home owner’s daily routine of slowly strolling around the property, the project evolved into a dynamic “three-step-courtyard”. The courtyard space was built by local artisans using locally-sourced materials such as constructed volcanic rock, catalpa wood, and tube tile. These unique materials were chosen to contrast with the privacy wall made of grey tiles, which pays homage to traditional Chinese architecture . Green vegetation is integrated into the design in various forms, from the patches of green lawn to the bushes and trees located throughout the space. + META – Project Via Archdaily

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Abandoned alleyway in Beijing reinvented as a stunning private courtyard

Global temperatures hit record high for the third year in a row

January 19, 2017 by  
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On Wednesday, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists marked a disturbing new milestone in Earth’s history: 2016 has been officially declared the warmest year on record . The previous record was set in 2015 , which beat record highs in 2014 . That means that for three years in a row, global temperatures have continued to soar to unprecedented highs unlike anything we’ve seen in the modern era. Part of the record-busting temperatures in 2015 and 2016 could be attributed to an unusually warm El Niño , however, without the ongoing release of greenhouse gasses into the air, even the recent weather phenomenon couldn’t have made such a strong impact. Deke Arndt, chief of global climate monitoring for NOAA, told the New York Times , “A single warm year is something of a curiosity. It’s really the trend, and the fact that we’re punching at the ceiling every year now, that is the real indicator that we’re undergoing big changes.” Related: Record-breaking CO2 levels mark a “new era” in the world’s climate Some of the most extreme temperatures were seen in the Arctic, with ocean temperatures rising 20 to 30 degrees above normal. In fact, the climate was so unusual that enough Arctic ice melted to let a luxury cruise ship cross the Northwest Passage for the first time ever. Nature photographers captured horrifying images of polar bears stranded on dry earth with no snow or ice in sight. Devastating drought also hit Africa and India, with the town of Phalodi experiencing the hottest day in recorded Indian history at 123.8 degrees. With El Niño over, scientists are expecting 2017 to be a cooler year than those that have come recently. However, that doesn’t mean climate change is not still a concern. In fact, some worry that climate change could accelerate quickly in the coming years. The temperature burst between 2013 and 2016 – about half a degree globally in total – was the largest change in a three year period measured on the planet’s surface since 1880. Via The New York Times Images via Swen George and Mehmet Canli

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Global temperatures hit record high for the third year in a row

The Long Drop is an odorless composting toilet built with waste materials

December 12, 2016 by  
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This eye-catching composting toilet called The Long Drop was built entirely from scavenged and waste materials. Invisible Studio Architects designed and built the project to serve their own studio in the UK, with the aim of reducing costs and mitigating any impact on the local drainage system. The toilet features a system that eliminates foul odors thanks to a long drop from the main structure to the chamber. An exhaust fan draws air into the chamber. The chamber for solids can be easily swapped, leaving a full one to compost , while the empty one is in use. Related: Nature Loo’s Composting Toilet Puts More Distance Between You and Your (Icky) Poo Box The studio designed the project with minimal drawings, and built it with help from friends and neighbors using locally-sourced wood ; they embraced the building’s rough edges and “mistakes” as a healthy sign of improvisation. + Invisible Studio Architects

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The Long Drop is an odorless composting toilet built with waste materials

Wood and metal sandwich panels clad PAN Architects’ striking Marseille Architecture School extension

August 3, 2015 by  
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Revolutionary construction system builds low-cost Syrian refugee schools out of sand

August 3, 2015 by  
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Myrtle Cottage Garden Studio is a cozy workspace that doubles as a secluded spot for deer-watching

July 8, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Myrtle Cottage Garden Studio is a cozy workspace that doubles as a secluded spot for deer-watching Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: copper facade , cottage , deer watching , green architecture , green cottage , green roof , locally sourced materials , natural lighting , small spaces , Stonewood Design , UK architects

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