Beautiful zoo pavilion built from sustainably sourced timber grows a green roof

October 21, 2016 by  
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The new entrance pavilion was commissioned for La Garenne zoo’s new location in Le Vaud and designed to “define the new identity of La Garenne zoo.” Both of the 315-square-meter building’s long facades are curved inwards and visitors pass through the center of each concave curve; this narrow channel marks the threshold between the outside world and the zoo . The pavilion’s hourglass shape flares out on both ends and includes a reception space, gift shop, restaurant, and multipurpose event space. Related: Tiny timber meditation pavilion in Italy reconnects people to nature A wide and curved vegetated roof with overhanging eaves tops the building. The timber pavilion is largely prefabricated to minimize construction waste and to make any future dismantling processes easy. All structural timber is FSC-certified or equivalent and the building earned Certificat d’Origine Bois Suisse accreditation for its use of Swiss wood, which accounts for 97% of the building materials. The facade features large glazed triangular panels that alternate with prefabricated wooden triangular panels. + LOCALARCHITECTURE Via ArchDaily Images via Matthieu Gafsou

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Beautiful zoo pavilion built from sustainably sourced timber grows a green roof

Ancient Japanese technique dresses up this renovated home in upstate New York

October 21, 2016 by  
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The original house was designed by architect John Bloodgood in the 1970’s. It was clad in T-111 siding and had no insulation . It also needed better mechanical systems, as well as a new roof and windows. The owner commissioned AlexAllen Studio to give the structure a makeover and upgrade it with low-maintenance materials. Related: Prefab Dutch ‘Shou Sugi Ban’ House Features a Low-Maintenance Charred Timber Facade The architects proposed Shou-Sugi Ban wood siding in combination with a more cost effective fiber cement panel for the facade. The wooden siding is manufactured using an ancient Japanese technique that preserves wood by charring its surface . Bug and rot resistant, the material weathers well over time and requires little maintenance. The team also introduced a layer of insulation under the siding, replaced the existing openings with triple-glazed windows, and added sun screens to protect the interior from the elements. + AlexAllen Studio Via uncrate Photos by Alan Tansey

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Ancient Japanese technique dresses up this renovated home in upstate New York

How millennials are re-shaping the future of food

October 21, 2016 by  
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Take a look at what’s for dinner over the decades and you will find more veggies and less meat on people’s plates. Not only are health concerns associated with the standard American diet being taken more seriously, but studies are also showing that millennials’ deep concern for the environment is leading to a boom in vegetarian dining that may completely reshape the future of food. Ben McKean, founder and CEO of Hungryroot , predicted in an  Observer op-ed that vegetables will outshine meat by the year 2020. And the shift will largely be thanks to the millennial generation. A study from 2014 titled “Outlook on the Millennial Consumer” highlighted how members of this age group are choosing foods according to their conscience and paying closer attention to ingredients and their origins, spelling bad news for animal agriculture. Related: Artificially grown lab meat could reduce emissions by 96% Livestock produce 18 percent of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions – more than the entire transportation sector combined. According to the United Nations, at least 26 percent of the world’s terrestrial surface is devoted to livestock grazing, a number that will only grow if the demand continues to soar. Simultaneously, the number of vegetarian restaurants and plant-based food products has grown significantly, thanks to a food revolution waged by younger generations. McKean argues that youngsters are not simply trading in meat for vegetables, but redefining what a “veg-centric” meal entails: equally delicious foods without the label of “alternative.” As climate change continues to intensify, the considerations of shifting the balance to more plant-based food is worth a closer look. Via Observer Images via Pixabay ( 1 , 2 )

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How millennials are re-shaping the future of food

Solar-powered Miami Science Barge teaches kids about sustainability

October 21, 2016 by  
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The Miami Science Barge’s aim is to educate children and the public on the environment and innovation ” to build a sustainable Miami .” Once aboard the science barge, visitors can check out the solar panels that power the barge, an aquaculture hatchery, and hydroponic systems. Related: Miami’s New Science Museum to Feature an Incredible 500,000 Gallon Gulf Stream Aquarium K-12 students can learn about science and sustainable technology outdoors on field trips at the Miami Science Barge. The Miami Science Barge’s curriculum highlights “the science behind renewable energy systems, the chemistry of growing food, sustainable food production, and methods of dealing with finite resources.” 140 people can come aboard the science barge, which also hosts cocktail hours, networking events, lectures, and parties. The general public is welcomed to check out the barge each weekend, from 10 AM to 4 PM on Saturdays and Sundays. The Miami Science Barge got its start with help from CappSci , a foundation aiming to apply science to global challenges, and from $298,633 the science barge team received in 2015 from winning the first Knight Cities Challenge , a competition that offers funding for people innovating to make cities better places. The Knight Cities Challenge is currently accepting entries for their third challenge. They accept applications from anyone who has a plan to make one of the 26 different communities in which the Knight Foundation invests a better place to live. They will be giving out up to $5 million to winners from the communities. You can find out more and enter your idea on their website ; the third challenge closes November 3. + Miami Science Barge + Knight Cities Challenge + CappSci Images courtesy of Miami Science Barge and Miami Science Barge Facebook

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Solar-powered Miami Science Barge teaches kids about sustainability

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