Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

January 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

Michigan just passed a new law that prohibits local governments from banning, regulating, or taxing the use of plastic bags and other containers. That’s right: it’s a statewide ban on banning plastic bags . The law was likely aimed at shutting down a local ordinance in Ann Arbor’s Washtenaw County, which would have instituted a 10 cent fee on grocery store bags. Plastic bag bans, of course, are intended to help keep pollution out of the environment. The flimsy plastic bags used in many grocery stores are not biodegradable and tend to find their way into waterways and the ocean, where they break down into smaller pieces that poison fish, seabirds, and marine animals. Even worse, they can take hundreds of years to break down in the environment – or even longer in a landfill . Related: Morocco just officially banned plastic bags Given the environmental impact, what possible reason could Michigan have for shutting down plastic bag bans within the state? In a word: money. Businesses complain that bans or taxes on bags are simply too high a burden for their everyday operations. Michigan isn’t the only state to have taken this approach, either: Idaho, Arizona, and Missouri have all enacted similar laws in recent years. Hopefully, as plastic bag bans become more common, it will become clear that industry claims about the cost and complexity of implementing the bans simply aren’t true. So far in the US, plastic bags have already been banned throughout California and in cities including Portland, Seattle, Austin, and Chicago. If these major cities and the country’s largest state can adapt to paper and reusable bags, surely Michigan could do so as well. Via The Washington Post Images via Randy Wick and Eric

Here is the original: 
Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

January 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

Michigan just passed a new law that prohibits local governments from banning, regulating, or taxing the use of plastic bags and other containers. That’s right: it’s a statewide ban on banning plastic bags . The law was likely aimed at shutting down a local ordinance in Ann Arbor’s Washtenaw County, which would have instituted a 10 cent fee on grocery store bags. Plastic bag bans, of course, are intended to help keep pollution out of the environment. The flimsy plastic bags used in many grocery stores are not biodegradable and tend to find their way into waterways and the ocean, where they break down into smaller pieces that poison fish, seabirds, and marine animals. Even worse, they can take hundreds of years to break down in the environment – or even longer in a landfill . Related: Morocco just officially banned plastic bags Given the environmental impact, what possible reason could Michigan have for shutting down plastic bag bans within the state? In a word: money. Businesses complain that bans or taxes on bags are simply too high a burden for their everyday operations. Michigan isn’t the only state to have taken this approach, either: Idaho, Arizona, and Missouri have all enacted similar laws in recent years. Hopefully, as plastic bag bans become more common, it will become clear that industry claims about the cost and complexity of implementing the bans simply aren’t true. So far in the US, plastic bags have already been banned throughout California and in cities including Portland, Seattle, Austin, and Chicago. If these major cities and the country’s largest state can adapt to paper and reusable bags, surely Michigan could do so as well. Via The Washington Post Images via Randy Wick and Eric

Go here to see the original: 
Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

Native American tribe is fighting against the Pilgrim Pipeline in New Jersey

January 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Native American tribe is fighting against the Pilgrim Pipeline in New Jersey

As oil and gas companies race to plan more pipelines to criss-cross America, conservationists are similarly ramping up their efforts to resist the environmentally destructive projects, and one such controversy in New Jersey is heating up quickly . The planned Pilgrim Pipeline would carry crude oil back and forth along the 178 miles from Albany, New York, to New Jersey’s Linden Harbor. The pipeline’s proposed route cuts through forests and a drinking water reservoir, prompting members of the Ramapough Lunaape Nation to organize a resistance camp, similar to the months-long backlash against the Dakota Access Pipeline in Standing Rock, North Dakota. While that struggle has been long and difficult, the Ramapough Lunaape in New Jersey will face a different and perhaps even more challenging fight against corporate interests, for a number of reasons. As is often the case with resistance efforts led by indigenous people , the Ramapough Lunaape must first defend their right to protest. Last week, the New Jersey town of Mahwah issued summonses against the protesters for setting up a camp and erecting protest signs without permits, even though the activity is all taking place on tribal land. One of the key obstacles for the Ramapough Lunaape is that their nation is not recognized by the federal government, so they are not protected in the same way. The Ramapough Lunaape Nation is instead only recognized at the state level in New Jersey and New York. It doesn’t take an expert to understand how this issue will complicate their fight against the proposed pipeline . Related: US Army blocks Dakota Access Pipeline in major victory for protesters The tribe has made numerous attempts to gain federal recognition, but those efforts have all failed. One such bid, in 1993, was struck down after Donald Trump (yep, that guy) campaigned against the nation’s recognition in order to eliminate the possibility of competition for his casino in Atlantic City. The tribe hasn’t given up, though, and an ongoing petition is still active to collect signature in support of adding the Ramapough Lunaape Nation to the list of federal recognized tribes. The Pilgrim Pipeline has been in planning for more than two years, and local communities along its proposed route have been protesting the whole time. The planned route would loosely follow the New York State Thruway and I-287 and then through North Jersey’s environmentally sensitive Highlands. Protesters are worried about the pipeline’s proximity to the Highlands reservoirs, which provide water to 5 million New Jersey residents. Much like other pipeline projects across the country, the developers Pilgrim Pipeline Holdings have pledged to go “full steam ahead” despite the environmental and public health concerns. Via Grist Images via Northjersey Pipeline Walkers and  Pilgrim Pipeline

View original post here: 
Native American tribe is fighting against the Pilgrim Pipeline in New Jersey

Ford to unveil new driverless Fusion Hybrid at CES

January 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Ford to unveil new driverless Fusion Hybrid at CES

Ford is revving up the future of autonomous vehicles with its new Fusion Hybrid . The second-generation Fusion is a departure from previous self-driving cars we’ve seen in testing. Ford opted to disguise the sensors and cameras that aid the Fusion in its operation, resulting in a sleeker body that looks more like a “regular car” than a car of the future. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OI1kf-a-pVo With just a few teaser images released so far, Ford is intentionally building up suspense for the full unveiling, which is planned for CES 2017 in Las Vegas later this month. Ford’s chief engineer for the autonomous vehicle program, Chris Brewer, elaborated on the technological advances in a post on Medium . The second-generation driverless Ford Fusion, he says, can “see” two football fields of distance in every direction, and its advanced field of vision means it requires fewer sensors than previous models. Related: Ford’s self-driving car will have no steering wheel, gas pedal, or brakes Ford also announced that it will expand its self-driving test fleet from 30 cars to around 90 in 2017, a big leap forward after just three years of development. The car maker is currently testing autonomous vehicles in California, Arizona, and Michigan, and will soon roll out pilot programs in the United Kingdom and Germany as well. Via The Verge Images via Ford

Read the original post:
Ford to unveil new driverless Fusion Hybrid at CES

Self-inflating HEXA raft automatically deploys upon contact with water

January 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Self-inflating HEXA raft automatically deploys upon contact with water

At sea, situations often emerge where crew and passengers have to quickly evacuate the vessel, causing panic, and jeopardizing safety and organization. To help simplify such scenarios, designers Yoo JiIn and Lee Ji Sang created HEXA, a six-sided life raft that automatically activates upon contact with water. In order to be deployed, HEXA requires only that it be dropped in the water where it automatically self-inflates into a life-saving device. Six inflatable sections allow people to climb onto the raft. In addition to the efficiency of its design, the device also sends a RFID signal that can help rescue teams pin point its location. Related: The SeaKettle is a Raft + Water Purifier That Could Save Your Life Various survival supplies like food, drinkable water, flares and lifejackets are available inside the center of the pod, providing survivors with all the essential things which will allow them to survive while waiting to be rescued. Via Yanko Design

Read the original post: 
Self-inflating HEXA raft automatically deploys upon contact with water

Bad Behavior has blocked 1034 access attempts in the last 7 days.