What Washington, D.C.’s progressive climate law means for commercial real estate

March 6, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on What Washington, D.C.’s progressive climate law means for commercial real estate

The nation’s capital just passed aggressive, practical legislation to green its buildings. Your city could be next.

Read more from the original source:
What Washington, D.C.’s progressive climate law means for commercial real estate

Episode 159: Director-investor disconnect, financing the circular economy transition

February 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Episode 159: Director-investor disconnect, financing the circular economy transition

Plus, introducing our semi-regular “What I Do” series, featuring United sustainability senior manager Aaron Robinson.

More here:
Episode 159: Director-investor disconnect, financing the circular economy transition

Why solving the problem of plastic waste begins at home

February 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Why solving the problem of plastic waste begins at home

New business models and incentives for consumers are two ways to start.

See the original post here:
Why solving the problem of plastic waste begins at home

Why it matters that affordable housing hits the triple bottom line

May 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Why it matters that affordable housing hits the triple bottom line

The net-zero energy (NZE) opportunity for all.

Here is the original:
Why it matters that affordable housing hits the triple bottom line

How Burton embeds sustainability and female empowerment in its products and leadership

May 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How Burton embeds sustainability and female empowerment in its products and leadership

With a resin-ating impact.

Originally posted here:
How Burton embeds sustainability and female empowerment in its products and leadership

A tale of two ‘living’ buildings in the Capitol

July 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on A tale of two ‘living’ buildings in the Capitol

Measuring the intangible value of two Living Building Challenge and WELL Building certifications in Washington, D.C.

The rest is here:
A tale of two ‘living’ buildings in the Capitol

GM, Michelin put brakes on deforestation linked to rubber

July 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on GM, Michelin put brakes on deforestation linked to rubber

Deforestation has accelerated in the rubber producing countries of Southeast Asia to feed global demand for tires. But Michelin and now General Motors have launched zero deforestation rubber procurement policies.

View original here:
GM, Michelin put brakes on deforestation linked to rubber

New Belgium, Yards, Sierra Nevada breweries leverage green tech

July 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on New Belgium, Yards, Sierra Nevada breweries leverage green tech

We’ll toast to that!

View original here:
New Belgium, Yards, Sierra Nevada breweries leverage green tech

A case for reconstructing the world of sustainable building standards

March 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on A case for reconstructing the world of sustainable building standards

Certifications must go beyond incremental improvements meant to minimize climate change. Instead, architects and engineers should aspire to create blueprints that are socially, economically and environmentally “regenerative.”

See the rest here:
A case for reconstructing the world of sustainable building standards

Living Baubotanik tree tower rises in Germany

August 30, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Living Baubotanik tree tower rises in Germany

Baubotanik, or Living Plant Constructions, is the brainchild of architect Dr. Ferdinand Ludwig who found inspiration in the ancient art of tree shaping that’s spanned cultures worldwide, from medieval European topiary to Japanese bonsai . Baubotanik puts a modern spin on the natural process of grafting by adding metal scaffolding and other construction materials to transform the trees into a load-bearing structure. Over time, the exposed tree tissue grows around and bonds with the man-made materials. Related: India’s Amazing Tree Bridges Are Made of Living Roots and Vines! After years of research, Ludwig found that the most suitable tree species were those that are flexible and fast growing, such as sycamore/plane tree, poplar, birch, and hornbeam. While willow , a favorite material among tree sculptors like Patrick Dougherty , initially met Ludwig’s standards, he now avoids them citing problems with rot and durability. Ludwig and the Baubotanik Research Group have completed three seminal works over the last decade that test these botanically inspired building methods. In 2005, Ludwig collaborated with architect Oliver Storz and sculptor Cornelius Hackenbracht to grow and construct a footbridge made from willow trees and metal scaffolding. Stainless steel tubes were inserted between young willow saplings that eventually grew around the material until the tube was fully embedded. The tubes are used as handrails for the 2.5-meter-tall elevated walking surface made from steel grates that’s supported by the tree “columns.” Another early Baubotanik creation is the three-story-tall willow tower with a height of nearly nine meters and an eight-square-meter footprint. Unlike the footbridge, the tower design began with temporary steel tube scaffolding anchored into the ground. Containers of willow were inserted in the structure and watered constantly to encourage fast growth. The architects shaped the willow saplings into crisscrossing formations and drilled them in place with screws to preserve the contorted shapes. The metal scaffolding will be removed once the living structure is stable enough to support itself. The Plane-Tree-Cube Nagold is the biggest Baubotanik building to date and the first of its kind to be developed for an urban environment. Created for a 2012 regional horticultural show in Nagold, the award-winning building is constructed from live sycamore and a massive metal scaffolding structure that serves as a temporary base. The sycamore is shaped over time using pipes, regulators, sensors, and valves. The public was invited to enter the treehouse and climb its three levels. Like the tower, the Plane-Tree-Cube was developed so that the metal scaffolding can be removed once the shaped sycamores have achieved a stable state. Part sculpture and part architecture, these beautiful Baubotanik buildings are no replacement for conventional construction practices. Not only are they time and labor intensive, but they also demand ongoing maintenance as living, breathing structures. However, these thought provoking buildings aren’t for naught. They encourage us to embrace biodesign , harness nature’s existing benefits, and design with nature to create a more sustainable future. + Baubotanik Via ArchDaily Images via Baubotanik

Go here to see the original:
Living Baubotanik tree tower rises in Germany

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1167 access attempts in the last 7 days.