Modular Lego Lunch restaurant built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Lithuania

September 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Modular Lego Lunch restaurant built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Lithuania

A modular fast food restaurant popped up in Siauliai, Lithuania, to provide a healthy communal space that can be easily replicated anywhere. Architecture firm Hermann Kamte & Associates designed the restaurant, named Lego Lunch, as an affordable, reconfigurable space built from recycled shipping containers. Lego Lunch is a replicable structure that combines affordability and a low carbon footprint . The architects used recycled 20-foot shipping containers and combined them into a space where locals in Siauliai, Lithuania, can have a meal and relax during workdays. Small design interventions enhance the energy performance of the new building and give with warmth. LED lighting and additional insulation were also introduced to improve efficiency. Related: Nation’s largest shipping container restaurant was installed in just 3 days The architects conducted extensive programmatic analyses to achieve an optimal organization of the space. The purpose of the first analysis was to understand connections and interactions between owners, designers and customers. The second focused on the food preparation process, while the last phase combined the preceding two to create an optimal layout. + Hermann Kamte & Associates

Go here to read the rest:
Modular Lego Lunch restaurant built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Lithuania

Modular Lego Lunch restaurant built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Lithuania

September 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Modular Lego Lunch restaurant built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Lithuania

A modular fast food restaurant popped up in Siauliai, Lithuania, to provide a healthy communal space that can be easily replicated anywhere. Architecture firm Hermann Kamte & Associates designed the restaurant, named Lego Lunch, as an affordable, reconfigurable space built from recycled shipping containers. Lego Lunch is a replicable structure that combines affordability and a low carbon footprint . The architects used recycled 20-foot shipping containers and combined them into a space where locals in Siauliai, Lithuania, can have a meal and relax during workdays. Small design interventions enhance the energy performance of the new building and give with warmth. LED lighting and additional insulation were also introduced to improve efficiency. Related: Nation’s largest shipping container restaurant was installed in just 3 days The architects conducted extensive programmatic analyses to achieve an optimal organization of the space. The purpose of the first analysis was to understand connections and interactions between owners, designers and customers. The second focused on the food preparation process, while the last phase combined the preceding two to create an optimal layout. + Hermann Kamte & Associates

Here is the original: 
Modular Lego Lunch restaurant built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Lithuania

This mini caravan with a telescopic roof is the stuff of off-grid dreams

August 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This mini caravan with a telescopic roof is the stuff of off-grid dreams

The Slidavan Caravan is an ultra-compact, lightweight caravan with a handy telescopic roof that can be fully extended in less than a minute. The mini caravan , created by Wooden Widget , weighs a mere 300 kilos and comes complete with a living area that can be expanded to six-feet high, making it a dream home on wheels for any off-grid traveler. The Slidavan’s interior, although compact, provides all the basics of off grid living . The space-efficient design focused on creating a maximum interior volume, which led to the creation of an expandable roof. To provide the camper with flexible space options, a curved roof was designed to be placed on the camper’s box-shaped base. A handy lifting device installed directly underneath allows the roof to be raised in just under a minute, adding much more space to the interior. Related: Darling Tinycamper from Lithuania starts at just 7K The body of the caravan has two large windows on the side and the backdoor has a cutout to provide the interior with tons of natural light. On the interior, the built-in sofas on either side fold out to create a large double bed. A small table is mounted on the wall between the two sofas, and can be folded down when not in use. There is a small galley area on the left side, outfitted with a sink and a two-burner stove top. A hidden strip of LEDs provides the interior lighting. One of the most advantageous things about the Slidavan is its light-weight design. Constructed out of a sandwich of plywood over panels of extruded polystyrene, the caravan is a rigid, lightweight, durable, affordable, and well-insulated structure that can be towed by the smallest of cars. According to the designer, the Slidavan’s design was based on providing a practical camper van that was easily mobile, “In designing the Slidavan I confess I focused pretty much exclusively on practicality. The bottom line is, it’s all very well designing a fancy caravan with a nice flowing aerodynamic shape but it just adds complication to the build and the fitting out and at the end of the day you still have to drag this massive lump through the air at great expense and some trepidation.” + Wooden Widget  

More here:
This mini caravan with a telescopic roof is the stuff of off-grid dreams

Scientists finally know what is causing the underwater ‘fairy circles’ and it’s not good

August 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scientists finally know what is causing the underwater ‘fairy circles’ and it’s not good

Have you — like many — been dumbfounded by the mysterious underwater “fairy circles” found in the Mediterranean and Baltic sea? If so, you’re not alone. Fortunately, scientists finally know what is causing the sea floor phenomena, though it’s not likely to cheer you up. It turns out the “bald patches” devoid of vegetation are actually caused by a foreign species which may put entire ecosystems at risk. In the paper “Fairy Circle Landscapes Under The Sea,” published by Science Advances , lead researcher Daniel Ruiz-Reynés wrote that the invading species are being driven into the areas by polluted waters and climate change : “The spatial organisation of vegetation landscapes is a key factor in the assessment of ecosystem health and functioning,” he wrote, adding, “Spatial configurations of vegetation landscapes act as potential indicators of climatic or human forcing affecting the ecosystem.” The scientific name for the seagrass is Posidonia oceanica, and its dwindling presence signals that the region it is located in is threatened. If large populations of the seagrass disappear, the planet’s larger ecosystem will be affected, the researchers concluded. Unfortunately, it appears the circles, which have been found around the Danish coast as well as the Balearic islands, are more prevalent than scientists realized. This is because they are located below water . “Satellite images and side-scan cartography reveals that complex seascapes are abundant in meadows of Posidonia oceanica, suggesting that self-organised submarine vegetation patterns may be prevalent but have remained thus far largely hidden under the sea,” wrote Ruiz-Reynés. Furthermore, because the seagrass has a very low growth rate, losses are “essentially irreversible.” Related: Strange “Fairy Circles” Appear in the Middle of Africa’s Namib Desert Using findings from previous studies and by creating a mathematical model based on seagrass growth rates and long-distance interaction between underwater plants, the team was able to determine the cause of the fairy circles . Long story short, the competition for resources changes the dynamics of seagrass growth and is largely propelled by both climate change and pollution . This discovery is both intriguing and frightening, considering enough plastic is thrown away each year to circle the globe four times — and of that amount, 80 percent makes its way into the oceans . If humans collectively fail to curb carbon emissions and only haphazardly invest in sustainable initiatives, the effects of climate change will result in much of the planet becoming uninhabitable, as well as various species going extinct . + Science Advances Via The Daily Mail Images via University of Southern Denmark , Pixabay

View original here: 
Scientists finally know what is causing the underwater ‘fairy circles’ and it’s not good

Worlds largest bike parking garage opens in the Netherlands

August 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Worlds largest bike parking garage opens in the Netherlands

Good news for cyclists in the Netherlands — which, to be honest, is pretty much everyone. The country just unveiled the world’s largest bike parking garage ! By the end of 2018 the 184,000-square-foot facility beneath Utrecht’s central train station will be able to hold 12,500 parked bikes. For years, bicycle enthusiasts have been urging the government to update its parking infrastructure . Martijn van Es, the spokesman for the Dutch cycling organization Fietsersbond, says the country could do much more to accommodate the growing volume of cyclists . He said, “They have been talking about updating the city since 1989. The infrastructure hasn’t changed enough. And there are a lot more cyclists today than there were, [and much of the infrastructure] was built in the 1980s.” Van Es has a point. Bicycles outnumber people in the Netherlands , and the average citizen cycles more than 600 miles a year. Additionally, over one-fourth of the population bikes to work. It’s because of this that parking garages such as the one in development are in high demand. Related: The Netherlands is converting prisons into homes for refugees The Guardian reports that the Utrecht train station is an ideal location for the parking garage, as 40 percent of commuters who arrive there do so by riding a bike. And, according to Tatjana Stenfert, the project manager at Utrecht station’s square, even more bike parking will be added to the area in the future. She said, “We will have 12,500 places by the end of 2018. But then we will have to do some research and find more places for the bikes . It never stops. I look around and everyone is trying hard to find spaces – trying hard and fast.” + CU2030 Via The Guardian , Curbed Images via CU2030

Go here to see the original:
Worlds largest bike parking garage opens in the Netherlands

Tiny meditation shelters are the perfect place for hikers to connect with the forest

February 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Tiny meditation shelters are the perfect place for hikers to connect with the forest

These tiny  meditation shelters offer protection and a place to rest for hikers exploring the Lithuanian forests. The shelters are a place where people can find solitude to reconnect with nature and find harmony with the environment. A slithering stone pathway that weaves throughout the forest garden was inspired by a Lithuanian fairy tale about serpents. The project, named Gapahuk, is part of a larger Meditation Garden designed by Bjørnådal Arkitektstudio which won the American Architecture Prize 2016. Used for individual meditation and as a place where hikers can rest and get warm, this cluster of shelters was built during the Human Birdhouse Workshop in Lithuania last August. The team cleared a forest clearing and shaped pathways that naturally weave in and around the garden. Two fireplaces installed in front of the shelters are surrounded with sitting areas. Holy stones added to the site look like totems of masculine and feminine origin, while a symbolic stone pathway represents a Lithuanian fairy tale about serpents. Related: FORÊT II is a Meditation Pavilion Made from 810 Reclaimed Shipping Pallets The workshop took place on the property of famous Lithuanian children books author, poet and film/theatre director Vytautas V. Landsbergis. The idea was to design and build architecture in the style of Constructive Shamanism, which brings together architects, builders and spiritual practitioners to strengthen and reveal the connection between humans and nature. References to Lithuanian mythology dominate the project, with visitors participating in spiritual ceremonies and singing mantras around a bonfire. + Bjørnådal Arkitektsudio Via v2com Lead photo by Lidija Kaleinikovaite

Go here to see the original:
Tiny meditation shelters are the perfect place for hikers to connect with the forest

Eyesore garage transformed into a stunning waterfall illusion in Lithuania

September 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Eyesore garage transformed into a stunning waterfall illusion in Lithuania

The 4th annual Vilnius Street Art Festival in Lithuania is all about changing perceptions of existing city structures. The Vilnius Waterfall project revamps an old, riverside Soviet building from a concrete eyesore into a striking facade of rushing, tumbling waters, thanks to the creativity of street artist Ignas Lukauskas and Studio Vieta . The building belongs to the Lithuanian Parliament, housing and maintaining government-owned cars, yet the plain structure right on the Neris River has never been a dazzling addition to the cityscape. The addition of the lively, crashing waterfall image across the 2000-square-meter-exterior, albeit temporarily, completely changes the view from the river. Related: Street artist makes this Lithuania trolleybus vanish for a fleeting moment every day Artist Ignas Lukauskas based the project on the topic of his Ph.D. thesis that explores how art and architecture can disrupt urban landscapes. Water seems to flow naturally from the descending structures into the river, creating a unique and visually intriguing connection between manmade creation and Earth’s natural splendor. The Vilnius Waterfall is the one of the largest pieces ever curated for the street art festival, where the Vanishing Trolleybus by artist Liudas Parulskis was also featured. +Studio Vieta Images via Studio Vieta

View original post here: 
Eyesore garage transformed into a stunning waterfall illusion in Lithuania

"World’s saddest polar bear" offered new home at UK wildlife park

September 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on "World’s saddest polar bear" offered new home at UK wildlife park

A ” tragic polar bear ” living in a cramped space in China ‘s Grandview Aquarium incited international concern after photos and videos of him searching for a way out surfaced. Pizza the polar bear has been described as the “world’s saddest polar bear” and Animals Asia is gathering signatures to close the Grandview Aquarium. Now Yorkshire Wildlife Park has offered to provide Pizza with a large new home, but it’s unclear whether or not the aquarium will let Pizza go. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UhP4bcYcsU The Grandview Aquarium is located in a Guangzhou, China mall. Although an online petition has asked the general public to avoid the aquarium, some have stopped to take selfies. The aquarium also contains a wolf, six belugas, arctic foxes, and five walrus calves in ” horrifying conditions .” Related: Polar bears are getting dosed with Prozac to keep them calm in captivity Pizza has been offered a way out. The Yorkshire Wildlife Park offers polar bears 10 acres in which to play and two lakes. One lake is more than eight meters deep, so polar bears can dive as they do in wild habitats. Pizza would also be able to live with other polar bears instead of in the solitary space in which he is currently trapped. Dave Neale, Director of Animal Welfare for Animals Asia, said the organization has spoken with Grandview Aquarium and they realize they have made mistakes in providing habitats for their animals . Neale said Animals Asia would be ” delighted ” to see Pizza moved to Yorkshire Wildlife Park where he would “enjoy incredible facilities.” Yorkshire Wildlife Park’s offer stands only if Grandview Aquarium will not “replace Pizza with another polar bear or any similar-sized animal.” Over half a million people have signed Animals Asia’s petition to close the Grandview Aquarium. If you want to add your name to the petition, you can do so here . + Animals Asia + Yorkshire Wildlife Park Images via Graham Hogg

See the original post:
"World’s saddest polar bear" offered new home at UK wildlife park

Unexpected living room with Soviet-era furniture pops up in a Lithuanian lagoon

September 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Unexpected living room with Soviet-era furniture pops up in a Lithuanian lagoon

The Living Boom offers an unexpected and quiet respite in Nida, the bustling popular resort town in Lithuania. A team of 18 international architecture students completed the project within a span of two weeks. The public space is partially hidden behind a five-meter-tall wooden wall so that visitors must physically walk onto the pier to see the entirety of The Living Boom. The wall, fixed to a concrete floor with metal bolts, serves as the symbolic threshold between the “interior” living room and “outdoor” nature. “A pier is a dead end. How can one change the ‘end of this long path’ and celebrate its end as a new space?” Write the designers. “Being already set into boundaries on three sides by the element of water, the start of the project was to construct a fourth wall that creates a new space. As one walks along the pier, approaching the wall in the middle of the plain landscapes of lagoon and sand dunes , one yet has to find out what the space behind the wall offers. Only after physically walking through, one can see and grasp the new space, with furniture shining in red, generating an unseen space in the middle of water, sky, sand dunes and forest.” Related: This timber installation challenges students to think about new ways to design homes The Living Boom is outfitted with local Soviet-era furniture modified with modern elements by the students and includes a three-meter-long table, multiple benches, a traditional wind vane, a giant wooden chair, and even a fireplace. All parts of the installation were painted the same shade of red. + The Living Boom Images by Alexandra Kononchenko and Miguel Angel Maure Blesa

Excerpt from: 
Unexpected living room with Soviet-era furniture pops up in a Lithuanian lagoon

Daniel Libeskind unveils design for the new green-roofed Lithuanian Modern Art Center in Vilnius

November 26, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Daniel Libeskind unveils design for the new green-roofed Lithuanian Modern Art Center in Vilnius

Studio Libeskind just unveiled their latest design venture into the museum typology: the New Lithuanian Modern Art Center to be erected in Vilnius, Lithuania. The green-roofed building, dedicated to the works created by Lithuanian artists, was designed as two intertwined volumes clad in white concrete, with a large public piazza providing a connection to the historic medieval city which the museum aims to reference. Read the rest of Daniel Libeskind unveils design for the new green-roofed Lithuanian Modern Art Center in Vilnius

See the original post: 
Daniel Libeskind unveils design for the new green-roofed Lithuanian Modern Art Center in Vilnius

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1141 access attempts in the last 7 days.