‘Limits’ coffee table plays with distortion and spatial limits

April 7, 2016 by  
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Geometric shapes come together to form a smooth design that plays with space and function. Called Limits, the idea is “a compact table that pushes our perception of physical and philosophical boundaries,” states Singaporean designer, Kimberly Koh. Created entirely from wooden flat triangles, the joints have been smoothed over, giving the illusion of weightlessness and a sleek composition. Tapered joints and contrasting wood tones maintain the contrast between the various triangular planes, which therefore appear independent from one another. The absence of any vertical edges distorts the sense of perspective, thus distorting the ‘spatial limits’ of the table. The projecting, cantilevered design establishes a sense of imbalance, which suggests that the center of gravity will shift when items are placed on top of it. The middle compartment is removable, creating a more flexible design for users, who can mold the table to suit their creative and practical needs. + Florence Institute The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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‘Limits’ coffee table plays with distortion and spatial limits

‘Limits’ coffee table plays with distortion and spatial limits

April 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on ‘Limits’ coffee table plays with distortion and spatial limits

Geometric shapes come together to form a smooth design that plays with space and function. Called Limits, the idea is “a compact table that pushes our perception of physical and philosophical boundaries,” states Singaporean designer, Kimberly Koh. Created entirely from wooden flat triangles, the joints have been smoothed over, giving the illusion of weightlessness and a sleek composition. Tapered joints and contrasting wood tones maintain the contrast between the various triangular planes, which therefore appear independent from one another. The absence of any vertical edges distorts the sense of perspective, thus distorting the ‘spatial limits’ of the table. The projecting, cantilevered design establishes a sense of imbalance, which suggests that the center of gravity will shift when items are placed on top of it. The middle compartment is removable, creating a more flexible design for users, who can mold the table to suit their creative and practical needs. + Florence Institute The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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‘Limits’ coffee table plays with distortion and spatial limits

Live succulent art explores the relationship between natural and man-made environments

April 7, 2016 by  
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In his ongoing “Urban Wild” collection, artist Ivan Stojakovic creates a new and unique merging of painting, sculpture and the live wall. The artworks, comprising small and large formats, installations, and free-standing sculptures, are made out of deconstructed composite panels and live succulent plants . Stojakovic’s art has been an exploration of the evolving relationship between the natural and the fabricated world. In a statement on his website , Stojakovic said, “I aspire to give viewers a sense of flight, an inner high with overview of land, and raise their inner (environmental) awareness. I also wish to impact viewers with real plants inhabiting the traditional wall art format. The plants clash with fabricated forms, and resonate with rich textures and colors, in dynamically balanced compositions. In this way, I want the take the audience on a journey through changing landscapes in which wild natural and man made environments strive to reclaim one another.” + Ivan Stojakovic + Ivan Stojakovic Instagram The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Live succulent art explores the relationship between natural and man-made environments

Tiny coffee bar incorporates existing graffiti into recessed design

April 7, 2016 by  
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Australian design firm NOMA* has transformed this small recess into a unique take-away coffee bar in Mount Lawley. Rather than completely redesigning the original facade, the compact 11 square meter shop incorporates the preexisting graffiti art on the adjacent exterior. The Standby Espresso Tenancy exemplifies adaptive reuse of small, micro size, underutilized spaces and illustrates how small projects can engage local communities. This project has been entered in the Small Projects category of the Australian Institute of Architects W.A. Architecture Awards . + NOMA* The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Tiny coffee bar incorporates existing graffiti into recessed design

Korea’s platform_monsant cafe reflects its stunning volcanic surroundings

April 7, 2016 by  
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Korea’s platform_monsant cafe reflects its stunning volcanic surroundings

New Swedish wave energy buoy boasts 5x the output of existing technology

April 7, 2016 by  
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We already harness energy from the sun, the wind, and many other natural processes for our own uses, and electricity generated from ocean waves could be the next big thing in renewables. Known as wave energy , the concept is relatively new and technologies are still a bit rudimentary (and expensive), especially when it comes to large-scale energy generation. CorPower Ocean , based in Sweden, has developed a buoy that is surprisingly productive. One small buoy can generate enough electricity from the ocean to power 200 homes . Imagine what a farm full of floating buoys could do. Read the rest of New Swedish wave energy buoy boasts 5x the output of existing technology

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New Swedish wave energy buoy boasts 5x the output of existing technology

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