Geothermal-powered Lake Austin Home is tuned in to nature

September 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Local studio A Parallel Architecture designed the award-winning Lake Austin Residence, a beautiful luxury home that derives inspiration from nature. Despite its large 6,750-square-foot size and horizontal footprint, the contemporary house achieves a sense of lightness thanks to ample full-height glazing and limestone massing. The energy-efficient dwelling offers geothermal climate control, as well as onsite waste treatment and water collection. Spread out across two stories, the Lake Austin Residence comprises a series of stacked and staggered rectangular volumes clad in limestone brickwork and white stucco. Nearly flat roofs top the volumes, which are punctuated by large sections of glazing to let in natural light and views of the landscape. “Like a butterfly specimen pinned to its mounting, this sinuous lake-front home’s light floating roofs are anchored to its site by heavy rusticated limestone masses, while its horizontal footprint is spread out and sewn through the vertical punctuation of mature sycamore, cypress and pecan trees,” wrote the architects. Related: Dreamy summer retreat built of salvaged materials sends eclectic vibes in Austin To lend a sense of warmth to the glass and stone palette, the architects added a warm interior palette of oak, mahogany, and cedar as well as splashes of turquoise to reference the lake. The heart of the light-filled interior is a nearly double-height living room separated from the dining room and kitchen by a fireplace. The master suite is located on the right side of the house, while the three bedrooms are placed in the left wing. Sliding glass doors open the back of the property up to the outdoor stone patio, infinity pool, and Lake Austin . + A Parallel Architecture Via Dezeen Images via A Parallel Architecture

More here: 
Geothermal-powered Lake Austin Home is tuned in to nature

This library shows how beautiful sustainable design builds community

April 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on This library shows how beautiful sustainable design builds community

This gorgeous new library just an hour’s drive from downtown Toronto is a true civic center with its welcoming light-filled spaces nestled into a hillside. Canadian design firm RDHA recently completed the green-roofed Waterdown Library in Hamilton, built to replace a smaller municipal building and designed with a strong focus on sustainability. The new 23,500-square-foot building houses the traditional library functions as well as several other civic spaces including two community multipurpose rooms, the Waterdown Public Archive, a satellite municipal services outlet, a community information office, and police services. The Waterdown Library’s cantilevered form draws inspiration from its surrounding landscape of the Niagara Escarpment, a massive rock ridge that overlooks Lake Ontario. RDHA writes: “The design process for this 23,500 square foot facility began with an acknowledgement of its dramatic site on the Niagara escarpment. Taking advantage of the topography to provide expression and access to the different programmatic elements in the building, the scheme engages and responds to the site by creating an architectural promenade that culminates in elevated south-facing views to Dundas street, the escarpment and Lake Ontario beyond.” By nestling the library into the hillside, the architects disguise the library’s bulk and create a building that looks one-story from the exterior but actually contains six levels. The slab-like building cantilevers over ten feet towards the southwest to mimic the escarpment’s rocky outcrop. Floor-to-ceiling glazing wraps around the building to lessen the library’s monolithic appearance. The building is also clad in four-inch-thick locally quarried limestone panels and sixteen-foot-high solar fins. Related: Golden Gate Valley Library is a Solar-Powered LEED Gold Renovation in San Francisco The library’s focus on energy efficiency begins with reliance on natural lighting thanks to the full-height glazing and sawtooth-style skylights. Solar heat gain is mitigated by the ceramic frit pattern on the double-glazed, argon-filled, low E-glass. Douglas fir used for solar shading and for interior cladding and furnishing was sourced from the demolished Hamilton Central Library. Recycled, low-VOC , and local materials are used throughout the building. A sloping green roof tops the library, while bioswales filter and funnel stormwater runoff into an underground rainwater collection system. The Waterdown Library has become a major gathering place for the Hamilton community and the greater region, and has seen a 150 percent increase in visitor numbers compared to the old library it replaced. + RDHA Via Architectural Record Images via Tom Arban

Here is the original: 
This library shows how beautiful sustainable design builds community

Armenias first BREEAM-certified building is an earthquake-resistant international school

December 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Armenias first BREEAM-certified building is an earthquake-resistant international school

Deep in the forested mountains of the Armenian town Dilijan—colloquially called “Little Switzerland”—stands the country’s first BREEAM -certified structure: UWC Dilijan College . London-based Tim Flynn Architects designed the international school to work in harmony with the environment. Green roofs and living walls made from native vegetation cover large sections school’s main academic building to beautify the structure and tie the building back to its surroundings in the National Park of Dilijan. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2fWhg2kzrc The environmentally friendly UWC Dilijan College earned an international BREEAM “Good” rating for its design, but also focuses on encouraging collaborative learning and promoting self-motivated learning with attractive and welcoming architecture. A natural materials palette integrates the modern academic structures into the natural environment. Armenia’s famous local tufa limestone was used as the main building material and is complemented by 4,750 square meters of landscaping on the wavy, mountain-inspired roofs and 1,500 square meters of living green walls on the facade. Non-standard lawn and native plants were used to vegetate these areas so that the building will change appearance as the seasons change. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects renovate a derelict fire station into Antwerp’s new BREEAM-rated port headquarters The main school building is broken into small sections and contain the administration building, general classrooms, science and art block, and the learning center with the library, IT department, and group presentation rooms. Though modern in appearance, the use of textured masonry, red roofs, and overhanging balconies bring to mind traditional vernacular architecture. The interior is filled with natural light and centered around two atria . Since UWC Dilijan College is built in a seismically active zone, the school is designed with earthquake resistance in mind. A drainage system was installed on-site and retaining walls were built to protect against landslides. + Tim Flynn Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Daniil Kolodin

Read the original:
Armenias first BREEAM-certified building is an earthquake-resistant international school

The Armadillo Vault’s hundreds of limestone slabs are held together without glue

June 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The Armadillo Vault’s hundreds of limestone slabs are held together without glue

ETH Zurich’s Block Research Group worked in collaboration with engineering firm Ochsendorf DeJong & Block and masonry specialist The Escobedo Group to bring the structure to life using expertly designed compression techniques. 399 limestone slabs were brought together after mapping out the technique on RhinoVAULT , a design plugin licensed by the group. Philippe Block and Tom Van Mele of the research group said, “Without any glue or mortar, with perfectly dry connections, this is really a milestone for stone engineering.” Related: 26 years, 9 tons of limestone, and a whole lot of love went into this magical fairytale house The Armadillo Vault spans 16 meters (about 20 feet), yet some sections are only as thick as five centimeters. Proportionally, the structure is half the thickness of an eggshell and remarkably strong. Each slab of limestone was left unfinished on the bottom side for time’s sake, creating an exterior resembling an armadillo shell and an underbelly of textured stripes. The intentional choice of finicky limestone demonstrates how the “relationship between geometry and forces” can be achieved with precision and respect for the materials. Once the Venice Biennale ends, the Armadillo Vault will be moved to a different location. Described as an “intricate 3D puzzle ” by the team, the structure can be disassembled and put back together while still maintaining its stability. +ETH Zurich Via  Dezeen Images via Iwan Baan , David Escobedo ,  Anna Maragkoudaki

Go here to read the rest: 
The Armadillo Vault’s hundreds of limestone slabs are held together without glue

A massive sinkhole has reopened in Florida, two years after it swallowed a local man

August 20, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A massive sinkhole has reopened in Florida, two years after it swallowed a local man

In February 2013, a surreal disaster struck a 1970s-era house in the town of Seffner, just outside of Tampa, Florida . Shortly after Jeff Bush settled in for the night, his brother Jeremy heard him screaming for help, only to enter Jeff’s room and find that he and all his possessions had been swallowed up by a sinkhole. Jeff Bush’s remains were never recovered, and the sinkhole was filled in—but now, over two years later, the hole has reopened and is around 17 feet wide and 20 feet deep. For Jeff Bush’s family, it brings back unsettling memories, but for the state of Florida, the sudden appearance of sinkholes is something of a familiar problem. Read the rest of A massive sinkhole has reopened in Florida, two years after it swallowed a local man

Here is the original post:
A massive sinkhole has reopened in Florida, two years after it swallowed a local man

26 Years, 9 Tons of Limestone, and a Whole Lot of Love Went into this Magical Fairytale House

September 19, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 26 Years, 9 Tons of Limestone, and a Whole Lot of Love Went into this Magical Fairytale House

Read the rest of 26 Years, 9 Tons of Limestone, and a Whole Lot of Love Went into this Magical Fairytale House Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Baby Creek Road , balloon framing , Bloomington , Chris Martin , circular homes , DIY , home construction , Indiana , limestone , mosaic , natural lighting , owner build , passive design , plaster , septic , slow building , slow food movement , solar , turrets , witches hat

More here: 
26 Years, 9 Tons of Limestone, and a Whole Lot of Love Went into this Magical Fairytale House

The Force is Strong With This Sandcrawler-Inspired Star Wars House in South Korea

September 19, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The Force is Strong With This Sandcrawler-Inspired Star Wars House in South Korea

Read the rest of The Force is Strong With This Sandcrawler-Inspired Star Wars House in South Korea Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: atrium , death star architecture , futuristic architecture , horizontally banded windows , korea , Moon Hoon , playful architecture , sand crawler , south korea , south korea inspired architecture , star wars , star wars inspired house , yongjin

Read the original post: 
The Force is Strong With This Sandcrawler-Inspired Star Wars House in South Korea

Golfers Can Tee Off from Wingårdh Architects’ Green-Roofed Clubhouse in Sweden

June 12, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Golfers Can Tee Off from Wingårdh Architects’ Green-Roofed Clubhouse in Sweden

Read the rest of Golfers Can Tee Off from Wingårdh Architects’ Green-Roofed Clubhouse in Sweden Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , Architecture , Öijared , Daylighting , golf , Golf Club House , Gothenburg , green roof , limestone , Swedish design , swimming pool , Wingårdh Architects

Read more here: 
Golfers Can Tee Off from Wingårdh Architects’ Green-Roofed Clubhouse in Sweden

Larger Than Life LEGO Animals Pop Up at Iowa’s Reiman Gardens!

June 12, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Larger Than Life LEGO Animals Pop Up at Iowa’s Reiman Gardens!

Read the rest of Larger Than Life LEGO Animals Pop Up at Iowa’s Reiman Gardens! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ames , Art , art exhibit , eco design , eco-art , ecology , Gardening , gardens , green art , green design , iowa , iowa state university , lego art , lego certified builder , lego sculptures , LEGOs , life size lego sculptures , Nature , nature connects , reiman gardens , sean kenney , Sustainability , sustainable art , sustainable design

Original post: 
Larger Than Life LEGO Animals Pop Up at Iowa’s Reiman Gardens!

JVA’s Norwegian Truck Weigh Station Above the Arctic Circle Features a Green Roof!

June 12, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on JVA’s Norwegian Truck Weigh Station Above the Arctic Circle Features a Green Roof!

Read the rest of JVA’s Norwegian Truck Weigh Station Above the Arctic Circle Features a Green Roof! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Arctic Circle , green roofs , Gullesfjord , Gullesfjord Weigh Station , JVA , moysalen national park , northern norway , norway , Scandinavian design , sortland , Vesteralen Island

See the original post here:
JVA’s Norwegian Truck Weigh Station Above the Arctic Circle Features a Green Roof!

Bad Behavior has blocked 4826 access attempts in the last 7 days.