Green-roofed Swiss homes promote solar via 65 degree rotation

March 30, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

In the Swiss municipality of Bussigny, Crissier-based architecture practice  Bertola & Cie – SIA  has completed the 65 Degree Group Housing project, a collection of low-energy housing units that are deliberately oriented at 65 degrees to optimize solar collection and to ensure private garden spaces for every dwelling. Created as an “alternative to densification,” the housing complex consists of a mix of simplex and duplex typologies that cater to a variety of residents across different generations. In addition to  solar  panels, the project further avoids dependence on fossil fuels and promotes healthy living with the inclusion of two air-to-water heat pumps, green roofs and a double-flow air mechanical ventilation system for reducing micropollutants.  Completed in 2020 after three years of development, the 65 Degree Group Housing project in West Bussigny was created as part of a larger development scheme to introduce 3,000 inhabitants to the area by 2030. At the heart of the architect’s design is the desire to create a village-like  community  where each resident can enjoy an outdoor balcony and green space for winter gardening.  “The architectural concept rigorously follows the will to mark volumes plastically in a suite or a repetition of units voluntarily marked on the street side so that the future inhabitants identify their dwellings not with a housing bar but with small houses of 3 levels joined together,” the architects said of their design intent. “The building thus develops linearly and parallel to the street over a distance of almost 100m. A grid structures the project and is reflected in the structure of the building for the stairwells and is identified by the structural entablature of the in-situ and  prefabricated  concrete terraces.” Related: Experimental prefab home eschews fossil fuels in Geneva Metal railings and clinker  brick  help break up the concrete facade along the southwest side of the housing complex, while light-toned wood surfaces line the light-filled interiors.  + Bertola & Cie – SIA Photography by Mathieu Gafsou

See the original post:
Green-roofed Swiss homes promote solar via 65 degree rotation

Sunne passively and stylishly collects sunlight for use after dark

March 17, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Sunne passively and stylishly collects sunlight for use after dark

A recently launched Kickstarter campaign shines light on everyday possibilities for solar technology. Sunne is a smart light that combines the sustainable aspects of solar power with sleek interior design and optimal functionality. Based in Amsterdam, solar enthusiast Marjan van Aubel is dedicated to finding ways to rely on solar energy to enhance everyday products. Her most recent example, Sunne, harvests sunlight during the day while unobtrusively hanging in a window. It then stores the collected energy in an internal battery, which powers the ambient glow after dark. Sunne is designed to automatically turn on at dusk, although it can be turned off with a light touch or through use of an app, which is still under development.  Related: A magical field of solar-powered lights takes over a California landscape The light has three settings. ‘Sunne rise’ simulates the purple and yellow shades of early morning. ‘Sunne light’ offers a warm glow appropriate for reading. ‘Sunne set’ presents a fiery glow for ambiance. On dark, cloudy days, Sunne won’t be able to harvest fresh energy ; however, there is a backup charging option to keep the glow alive. Sustainability is at the heart of Sunne. To that end, the composition focuses on a long-lasting design. It is made using high-quality LED lights to enhance efficiency. The case is made from durable aluminum. The team works hand-in-hand with notable solar research center ECN.TNO in the Netherlands to identify the best solar cells available on the market. They’ve also planned for the eventual disposal when Sunne has come to the end of its usable lifecycle. Each part of the light can be easily removed, because the pieces are not glued or otherwise permanently connected. This allows the highly recyclable aluminum to live another life while leaving very little post-consumer waste. Packaging for Sunne relies on cardboard boxes and other eco-friendly materials. Aubel believes Sunne should be as much about style as it is about technology or function. With this in mind, the device can hang in a window, supported only by two steel wires. There are no unsightly cords or cables dangling from the device. While the curved design is sleek, shaped like the horizon from a single strip of aluminum, the contour provides a larger surface area for maximum solar cells . The team is continuing to develop the app, which will allow users to see how much energy is stored in Sunne and monitor the battery level. It will also allow you to control the on/off and light settings. The Sunne Kickstarter campaign quickly surpassed its initial pledge goal. It closes on April 2, 2021. Expect more to come from Aubel, with a new solar roof on exhibition as part of the Dutch Pavilion at the World Expo in Dubai in October 2021. + Sunne Images via Sunne

See more here: 
Sunne passively and stylishly collects sunlight for use after dark

Award-winning, 3D-printed smart lamp references Arabian wind catchers

March 10, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Award-winning, 3D-printed smart lamp references Arabian wind catchers

Last year, designer Muhammad Khalid of Khawarizm Studio unveiled ‘The Future Catcher,’ a sculptural, 3D-printed smart lamp that placed third in the 2020 3D Printed Luminaire Design Competition, an event hosted by Huda Lighting in partnership with Immensa Additive Manufacturing to boost awareness of 3D printing technology in lighting and interior design industries. The innovative prototype celebrates the designer’s cultural heritage with a form inspired by famous wind catchers in Arabian architecture. The Future Catcher light fixture — also called Lou’Lou’ after the Arabic word for “pearls” — was exhibited at Dubai Design Week 2020 hosted by Colab space. Launched in March 2020, the 3D Printed Luminaire Design Competition not only gave designers across the MENA region a platform to showcase bespoke lighting products, but it also bolstered the UAE’s reputation as a hub for innovation in 3D printing. The shortlisted projects, picked by a multidisciplinary panel of experts, were 3D-printed by Immensa Additive Manufacturing Labs and exhibited at the Huda Lighting Dubai Showroom. Related: 3D-printed concrete “forest” pavilion proposed for Dubai’s Expo 2020 The four winning designs all feature dynamic and organically inspired forms, from first place winner Chirag Rangholia’s root-like ‘Chrysaora’ pendant lamp to Alaa Shibly’s angular fixture that’s aptly named ‘Bat’s Movement Biomimicry’; Shibly’s design tied with Khawarizm Studio’s entry for third place in the competition. The Future Catcher/Lou’Lou’ smart lamp is based on IoT (internet of things) technology and integrates sensors to respond to user commands for different lighting modes and colors.  “Our concept is to develop our cultural heritage in a futuristic design process,” Khawarizm Studio explained. “The form is influenced by famous wind catchers in our Arab world culture with parametric organic growth from the Voronoi 3D fractals to represent our love for Arabic heritage and organic growing patterns. As we are living in the age of fluidity in Zygmont Baumann’s philosophical approach; we decided to enhance fluidity in the Voronoi pattern, using just one algorithm for endless variations that represents the current hegelian Zeitgeist.” + 3D Printed Luminaire Design Competition Images via Khawarizm Studio

Original post: 
Award-winning, 3D-printed smart lamp references Arabian wind catchers

Modern wood cabin embraces daylight and landscape views in Norway

February 9, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Modern wood cabin embraces daylight and landscape views in Norway

On a steep hillside perched high above the Norwegian city of Molde, Oslo-based architecture firm Rever & Drage Architects has completed the Zieglers Nest, a modern wood cabin punctuated with large glazing to take in sweeping panoramic views of the Moldefjord and mountains beyond. Commissioned for a family of five, the home makes the most of its small plot and minimizes concrete foundations with its tall, slender build comprising four stories. Views of nature and access to natural light largely informed the design, which is kept deliberately minimalist with unpainted timber surfaces throughout so as not to detract from the region’s natural beauty. Completed last year, Zieglers Nest is set atop an uninsulated concrete basement level used for parking and storage in the front with a 5-meter-tall multipurpose room in the rear for a trampoline and ball games. The sheltered outdoor space is well-ventilated — gaps along the building’s west and east facades let in natural light and air — and equipped with flood lights to give the children a safe, comfortable play space outside of the main floors. Related: This rustic Norwegian cabin looks like four different buildings all joined together Above the concrete ground level, the architects constructed a timber-framed structure with the top two floors built using log cabin construction. The first floor consists of two bedrooms, a shared bathroom and a wardrobe. Stairs lead up to the light-filled main living area comprising a kitchen with a conservatory , a spacious, double-height living room and a library. The topmost floor has a bedroom, a bathroom and a gallery space with a “Romeo and Juliet balcony” that overlooks the living room for home performances. The roof terrace is also accessible and perfectly positioned for views of the evening sun and northern lights. Designed to make the outdoors the primary focus, Zieglers Nest features a series of large, insulated windows. The timber cladding is vertically oriented on the south side and horizontally oriented on the east and west side to differentiate the facades. The northern facade in the rear is highlighted with a window shutter and dovetail notch corner. The architects explained, “What one attempts to achieve in differentiating the facades in this way is, first, that the building can be read as four volumes rather than one, thus softening the otherwise rigid rectangular prism effect, and secondly the fronts gives an external indication of the inside rooms’ directions.” + Rever & Drage Architects Photography by Tom Auger via Rever & Drage Architects

Original post:
Modern wood cabin embraces daylight and landscape views in Norway

Local materials make up a lakeside home tied to nature

November 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Local materials make up a lakeside home tied to nature

On the shore of Lake Simon in the Outaouais region of  Québec , Montreal-based architecture firm  L’Abri  has replaced a family’s cottage with an elegant and modern escape deeply rooted in the landscape. Designed for a family of six, the 5,400-square-foot Baie-Yelle House pays homage to the original cottage with reclaimed materials such as stones salvaged from the original chimney that’s now used in the large wine cellar.  The architects took a  site-specific  design approach to the Baie-Yelle House as a means of celebrating the surrounding lakeside. To ensure that the landscape remains the focal point, the architects used a restrained materials palette that includes timber, metal and stone. The metallic siding that wraps around a portion of the setback ground volume mimics the shimmering waters of the lake, while the top volume is clad in an indigenous species of white cedar that’s left untreated, allowing it to develop a silvery patina over time.  “The design puts forward the use of  local materials  and a sensibility to the site’s environment and natural qualities,” the architects explained in a press release. “The materials are celebrated for their essence, bringing warmth and balance to an otherwise sober and contemporary composition. Of natural wood and anodized metal, the construction is formed of interlocking volumes oriented to open the relationship between the interiors and exterior.” Related: Young carpenter builds cost-effective timber cabin for his first home Natural materials continue inside the light-filled interiors. A gray limestone masonry fireplace anchors the  double-height  living room that faces the lake and provides a handsome focal point. The open-plan great room also connects to a large outdoor terrace. Even the raw steel staircase leading to the upper floor pays homage to the lake; the wooden treads were made from salvaged log drive trunks that sank to the bottom of the lake in the 1850s and were recovered and repurposed by a local artisan. + L’Abri Images by Raphaël Thibodeau

Read the rest here:
Local materials make up a lakeside home tied to nature

Applying rock dust to farms could boost carbon sequestration

July 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Applying rock dust to farms could boost carbon sequestration

A report in the journal Nature has revealed that enhanced rock weathering (ERW) could help slow climate change by sucking carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This process involves spreading rock dust on farmland to help absorb atmospheric carbon dioxide. When rocks, such as basalt and other silicates, are crushed and added to the soil, they dissolve and react with carbon dioxide, forming carbonates and lock carbon dioxide. Although this is the first time that scientists are proposing this approach in dealing with carbon dioxide, it is not a new concept. Normally, farmers use limestone dust on the soil to reduce acidification. The use of limestone in agriculture helps enhance yield. If the proposed enhanced rock weathering technique is adopted, farmers could incorporate other types of rock dust on their land. Related: Eos Bioreactor uses AI and algae to combat climate change According to the study, this approach could help capture up to 2 billion metric tons of CO2 each year. This is equal to the combined emissions of Germany and Japan. Interestingly, this technique is much cheaper than conventional methods of carbon capturing. The scientists behind the study say that the cost of capturing a ton of CO2 could be as low as $55 in countries such as India, China, Mexico, Indonesia and Brazil. For the U.S., Canada and Europe, the cost of capturing one metric ton of CO2 with ERW would be about $160. The scientists propose using basalt as the optimal rock for ERW. Given that basalt is already produced in most mines as a byproduct, adding it to farmland soils can easily be instituted. Further, the countries that contribute the highest amounts of carbon dioxide are the best candidates for the ERW technique. Countries such as China, India and the U.S. have large farmlands that can be used to capture excess CO2 from the atmosphere. Given that carbon emissions are a big problem for the entire world, this technique might just be the light at the end of the tunnel. The enhanced rock weathering technique is affordable and practical, making it a win-win. + Nature Via The Guardian Image via Pixabay

See more here: 
Applying rock dust to farms could boost carbon sequestration

PICO microgarden lets you grow anywhere from home to car

April 22, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on PICO microgarden lets you grow anywhere from home to car

Indoor gardening offers all the same benefits as a garden in the ground outside. Namely, fresh food and a  low environmental impact . But not everyone has the natural space for a garden, which is where indoor planting comes in for the win. While there are many systems and techniques you can implement inside the home, PICO stands out as a versatile option that you can place anywhere and still achieve growing success.  Most plants need to be located near a window for light. Often this means taking up limited tabletop or bookcase space. PICO is different because, while setting it on a tabletop is an option, it will also mount to vertical surfaces. In fact, it comes with a magnetic mount, which could be used on a refrigerator or desk, plus a standard wall mount and Velcro option for mounting to windows, mirrors and other surfaces. There are also three color options to match nearly any decor. The unit comes fully assembled. All you have to do is add a bit of soil and a few of your favorite seeds. There is no membership or seed pod to purchase. Watering is stable and consistent with a water reservoir and easy fill spout. A transparent window in the front allows you to easily see when more water is needed, typically about once each week. From there, the system automatically wicks water from the reservoir through the soil, using an on-demand system that replenishes moisture as the soil dries out.  With location and watering figured out, the last major component for successful indoor growth is proper lighting. PICO is equipped with a multi-spectrum growing light that conveniently extends from the compact planter design. As your plant grows, the light extends up to one foot higher for consistent light.  PICO is the newest addition to the  urban gardening product line from Altifarm Enverde, the company that previously released two larger versions of in-home garden systems. While PICO is not intended to provide high quantities of food, it’s automatic functions and placement versatility make it an option for growing readily available herbs, visually pleasing succulents, or fragrant mini roses. PICO is currently trending on a Kickstarter campaign that will close on May 17th. Shipments are expected immediately following the end of the campaign.  + Altifarm Enverde  Images via Altifarm Enverde

Original post:
PICO microgarden lets you grow anywhere from home to car

6 ways to save energy while sheltering in place

April 21, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on 6 ways to save energy while sheltering in place

Now that millions of Americans are isolated in their homes, everyone is using more energy during off-peak hours. Americans are getting more concerned with paying their growing electricity bills. Combined with the obvious environmental tolls of changing and increased at-home energy usage, paying a larger bill during times of economic uncertainty is enough to weigh on anyone’s heightened nerves. Inhabitat has rounded up some tips and tricks to help readers save energy (and money) at home during this time. The good news is that energy usage outside the home is at a 16-year low in the United States. The novel coronavirus has caused a huge drop in energy consumption throughout the country since stay-at-home measures have been implemented. Entire businesses have shut down, and most industrial activity has come to a grinding halt. According to the World Economic Forum , the demand for electricity fell by 5.7% from the week of April 14, 2020 compared to the same week in 2019 — the lowest since 2004. The U.S. Energy Information Administration projected that the combination of this economic slowdown and ongoing stay-at-home orders would help further reduce electricity and natural gas consumption in the coming months as well. The administration expects power consumption in the country to decline by 3% in 2020 before rising 1% in 2021. Related: How to volunteer during COVID-19 Still, while you are at home, you can further reduce energy consumption and minimize your energy bill by following these simple tips. Utilize natural light and open windows This pandemic is coming at a time of unpredictable spring weather. Some places around the country are beginning to warm up, but others are still feeling the effects of a longer winter with cold, rain and even snow. Something as simple as letting the light in during sunny days can not only raise your spirits but also lower your energy bill. If it is warm enough, open the windows to bring in fresh air. Even simply opening the blinds or curtains provides natural light, which is essential for working and your mental health. Daylighting also negates the need for artificial energy-using overhead lights or desk lamps. Swap electronics for creative activities It is easy to spend hours binging a new TV series or get sucked into playing video games when you’re stuck at home all day. Give your eyes a rest by swapping your nightly TV marathon for non-electrical activities such as reading, drawing or solving puzzles. It is no secret that our phones and computers are most people’s only link to the outside world right now, so start small with a couple of hours a day without electronics, adopt no-tech days or practice phone-free Sundays. Check in with your thermostat With more people staying at home 24/7, thermostats that are usually lowered or even switched off while everyone is normally at work or school are now running at higher capacities for longer amounts of time. Don’t forget to check in with yourself and adjust the thermostat accordingly. Fluctuations in temperature during this season mean that a smart thermostat could particularly come in handy, as it can learn your home’s heating and cooling patterns. Smart thermostats have the ability to adjust the temperature automatically instead of manually, so you will have a more optimal at-home climate as well as a reduced electricity bill. Only plug in devices when needed According to the U.S. Department of Energy, standby power from electronic devices accounts for about $100 of the average American’s electricity bill each year. If you’re working from home, chances are you’ve borrowed computers, printers, scanners or phones from your work office to make the transition to remote employment a bit easier. If you’ve become unemployed, you may be spending more time catching up on your favorite shows or surfing the internet, or maybe school closures have led to full-time homeschooling. Regardless, that means there are more devices plugged into your home’s outlets than there were a few months ago, and they are all consuming power even when they are not being used or are on standby. Be mindful of unplugging as much as you can at the end of your remote work or school day. You might consider investing in a smart power strip or two around the house, which can help you pick and choose which items to keep on or make it easier to turn everything off when not in use. Turn off the lights in unused rooms This may seem obvious, but the simple act of turning off lights in empty rooms does wonders for your electricity bill. Switching off the lights whenever possible will extend the life of your lightbulbs , too. If you’re not used to hitting the light switch whenever you leave the room, take this time to be more mindful of it. It is good practice for the future! Practice an energy-efficient laundry routine Household appliances make up a massive portion of energy use in American households. Remember to wait until your washing machine or dishwasher is full before running it — your washer will use almost the same amount of energy no matter the size of the load. Wool dryer balls help separate clothes, absorb moisture cut drying time and reduce static (no need for dryer sheets). While using cold water in your washing machine saves the largest amount of energy, even using warm water instead of hot water can cut energy use in half. Plus, you will not only save energy, but also detergent, dish washing soap and time! If the weather is nice, consider hanging laundry on a line outside to dry. Via Consumer Energy Alliance and Energy.gov Images via Pixabay and Unsplash

Read the original: 
6 ways to save energy while sheltering in place

Wedge-shaped Sideyard champions CLT construction

April 21, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Wedge-shaped Sideyard champions CLT construction

When Portland, Oregon reconfigured the roadways in the Central Eastside community, a 20,000-square-foot berm space was leftover from the move. To make the most of the small and oddly shaped site, Key Development teamed up with local architecture firm Skylab and Andersen Construction to use cross laminated timber (CLT) in the construction of Sideyard, a mixed-use development. The CLT components were prefabricated in a factory and then transported on-site for final assembly, a modular process that streamlined the building process and boasts environmental benefits. Located on a busy intersection next to the YARD apartments, the 23,202-square-foot Sideyard comprises a mix of retail and offices across five floors with retail located on the ground floor and workspaces placed on the top levels. Conceived as a “working class” building and gateway to the Portland Eastside community, Sideyard also emphasizes public transportation connectivity as well as pedestrian and bicycle accessibility, which has been enhanced with the addition of a ground-floor bike bar and pedestrian-friendly plaza extended from the city sidewalk. A pedestrian stair has also been integrated down from the Burnside Bridge level to Third Avenue. Related: First CLT Passive House project in Boston breaks ground The use of cross-laminated timber was critical to the project’s success. Because of the site’s tight footprint, construction materials could not be stored on-site for long; the modularity of the CLT panels and glulam members allowed for quick assembly of the building atop a post-tensioned concrete foundation. The interior features an industrial feel thanks to exposed concrete and timber throughout, while floor-to-ceiling glazing creates a constant connection with the surrounding neighborhood. “Cross-laminated timber is a new and sustainable building material that celebrates the inherent structural qualities of wood,” said Jill Asselineau, project director for Skylab Architecture. “This material was championed by the general contractor for its regional relevance, availability and simplicity of assemblage. Employing this mass timber system saved on both time and labor expenses. The project also used mass plywood for the interior stair structure, landings and treads. This project is one of the first to employ and elegantly demonstrate the potential of this wood product.” + Skylab Architecture Photography by Stephen Miller via Skylab Architecture

Original post:
Wedge-shaped Sideyard champions CLT construction

These adorable fish lamps raise awareness of plastic pollution

April 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on These adorable fish lamps raise awareness of plastic pollution

Single-use plastics are everywhere. No matter how small they are, these plastics often end up in either landfills or the oceans , taking hundreds of years to decompose. When Heliograf designers Jeffrey Simpson and Angus Ware realized just how many single-use soy sauce packets went into a single sushi meal, the idea for Light Soy lamps was born. In Japan, a packet containing one single serving of soy sauce often comes in the shape of a small fish made of polyethylene. Similar to plastic straws and other single-use plastics, the packets are too small to be easily recycled . The irony that these single-use plastic containers created to look like fish would later become ocean pollution with the potential to harm marine life was not lost on the designers. Related: This lamp is a work of art that cleans the air Heliograf decided to find a fun way to highlight this issue, creating something both beautiful and functional. The resulting design took about three years to develop, including two years that the designers spent learning how to perfect the glass-blowing technique. Light Soy is a borosilicate glass lamp in the same shape as the iconic, fish-shaped soy sauce packets that have been used in Japan since the 1950s. It features an energy-efficient LED light and powder-coated aluminium accessories, with a frosted glass design that creates a soft glow when illuminated. There are two models available: The Light Soy Table Lamp and the Light Soy Pendant Light. The table lamp is portable and USB-C rechargeable with an aluminum base and a touch-controlled dimming feature, and the pendant version comes with a bespoke aluminium ceiling canopy. The modular components in the lamp make it simple to either repair or replace individual parts as needed.  The lamp packaging is free of plastics; it is made using a recyclable and biodegradable bagasse sugarcane pulp and cardboard. To negate the need for a plastic carrying bag, the packaging also comes equipped with a cotton cord as a handle. Heliograf is a member of 1% For the Planet, with 1% of the Sydney-based design studio’s revenue going toward nonprofits aimed at preventing plastic pollution from entering our oceans. + Heliograf Photography by Daniel Hermann-Zoll via Heliograf

See more here:
These adorable fish lamps raise awareness of plastic pollution

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2148 access attempts in the last 7 days.