Episode 126: United’s biofuels mission, why it’s time to bone up on ’emissionality’

June 1, 2018 by  
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In this episode, we check in with Interface executive Jarami Bond, one of our 2017 30 Under 30 honorees. Plus, why it might be time to overhaul the LEED sustainable buildings certification framework.

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Episode 126: United’s biofuels mission, why it’s time to bone up on ’emissionality’

LEED must be updated to address climate change

May 24, 2018 by  
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If the green building ratings system doesn’t mandate deep CO2 reductions, it will fail its most important test of leadership.

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LEED must be updated to address climate change

Perkins+Will designs LEED Gold-seeking academic building for York University

March 21, 2018 by  
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Perkins+Will has won a design competition for the Toronto’s York University School of Continuing Studies, an eye-catching building that will target impressive eco-credentials. The design, which beat out a shortlist of seven proposals, is expected to meet a minimum certification of LEED Gold with potential for net-zero energy and net-zero carbon. The $50.5 million School of Continuing Studies will break ground in 2019 on York University’s Keele campus. Proposed for a corner lot near the new York University TTC subway station, the 9,000-square-meter School of Continuing Studies will include 39 classrooms, student lounges, workspaces , and staff rooms. The dramatic building twists into a sharply angled geometric form informed by the campus public realm, existing circulation patterns, and solar studies. Solar panels integrated into the prismatic facade are placed for optimized solar orientation. Related: Perkins + Will’s KTTC building blends beauty and sustainability in Ontario “The design balances the needs of the school itself, the larger campus , and the planet, setting a new standard for sustainability, design excellence, and student experience on Canadian campuses,” wrote Perkins+Will. Abundant natural lighting, glazing, and an emphasis on transparency throughout the building will help encourage students to interact. The building envelope is expected to meet Passive House standards with the goal of reducing embodied carbon and improving occupant health. + Perkins+Will Images via Perkins+Will

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Perkins+Will designs LEED Gold-seeking academic building for York University

LEED Gold lab by the ocean can withstand flooding and hurricane-force winds

February 20, 2018 by  
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GLUCK+’s new research facility for Duke University boasts beautiful coastal views as well as impressive eco-friendly credentials. Recently crowned LEED Gold , the Dr. Orrin H. Pilkey Research Laboratory in Beaufort, North Carolina features a slew of sustainable elements from use of recycled materials and reduced water use to energy-efficient heating and cooling technologies designed to cut energy costs by 30 percent. The state-of-the-art facility’s most salient sustainability feature, however, is the engineering behind the building’s ability to weather storm surges and hurricane-force winds. Located on the southern tip of Pivers Island, Pilkey Research Laboratory is the first new research building constructed at Duke University Marine Laboratory since the 1970s. In response to current concerns of sea level rise and other extreme weather, GLUCK+ made weatherproofing the 12,000-square-foot lab a priority. To protect against storm surges, the building is made up of a series of boxy volumes of varying sizes arranged in a pinwheel formation. In a nod to the waterfront campus’ existing buildings, the lower volumes are clad in cypress, whereas white cement board covers the upper volume. Related: GLUCK+’s Green-Roofed Pavilion Pool House Melts Into the Landscape of Lake George, NY The asymmetrical volumes are centered on an area called the Collisional Commons, a public meeting area for informal interactions. Here, views of the coastline can be enjoyed through full-height glazing that also opens up to outdoor seating. All regularly occupied rooms also have access to surrounding views and abundant natural light and ventilation. Faculty offices, a PhD bullpen, teaching lab, a video conference room and service spaces surround the commons. The laboratories with equipment-intensive research spaces are housed in the upper level. + GLUCK+ Via Dezeen Images by Paul Warchol

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LEED Gold lab by the ocean can withstand flooding and hurricane-force winds

MADs mountain-like towers reach completion and LEED Gold in Beijing

December 5, 2017 by  
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Many of Asia’s high-rises may seem indistinguishable from those in the West, but MAD Architects’ recently completed Chaoyang Park Plaza puts a unique Chinese spin on skyscraper design. Located in Beijing’s central business district, the mixed-use development takes inspiration from the ‘shan shui’ style of traditional Chinese landscape painting that emphasizes balance and flowing lines. The mountain-like buildings, lush vegetation, and water features evoke an oasis of nature in a dense concrete jungle. The 220,000-square-meter Chaoyang Park Plaza comprises 10 buildings that eschew modern boxy forms for the curved forms commonly found in shan shui paintings. “It is an extension of the park into the city, naturalizing the CBD’s strong artificial skyline, borrowing scenery from a distant landscape ? a classical approach to Chinese garden architecture, where nature and architecture blend into one another,” wrote MAD architects. Ma Yansong, the founder of MAD architects, elaborates: “In modern cities, architecture as an artificial creation is seen more as a symbol of capital, power or technological development; while nature exists independently. It is different from traditional Eastern cities where architecture and nature are designed as a whole, creating an atmosphere that serves to fulfill one’s spiritual pursuits. We want to blur the boundary between nature and the artificial, and make it so that both are designed with the other in mind.” The pedestrian experience shares similarities with walking through a river valley with meandering pathways, flowing water features, traditional Eastern landscape elements like bamboos and pines, and organic boulder-like shapes. Offices will be housed in the two largest buildings that look like a pair of asymmetric mountains, as well as one of the lower-lying buildings on the south side of the site. Shorter buildings shaped like round river stones contain commercial space, while two Armani towers on the southwest side contain residences. Related: MAD Architects Break Ground on Mountainous Chaoyang Park Plaza in Beijing The project earned LEED Gold certification for its use of vertical fins on the exterior that have the double benefit of mitigating solar gain and emphasizing the smoothness and verticality of the towers. To combat Beijing’s sweltering summers, the architects installed a pool outside to serve as an air-cooling system and designed the building systems to draw in fresh air. + MAD Architects Images © Hufton+Crow

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MADs mountain-like towers reach completion and LEED Gold in Beijing

Perkins + Will overhauls a boring concrete warehouse into beautiful LEED Gold offices

August 23, 2017 by  
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At first glance, it’s hard to imagine that this gorgeous light-filled building was once an uninspiring concrete monolith. It’s a testament to the architectural might of Perkins + Will , which transformed the 1940s military warehouse in San Francisco into the LEED Gold -certified Bay Area Metro Center. Constructed with recycled materials, this eight-story adaptive reuse project features soaring ceilings with state-of-the-art offices, community hearing spaces, a boardroom, and ground floor retail. Located at 375 Beale Street, this massive 525,000-square-foot building once served as a navy supply warehouse during World War II and exuded an air of impenetrability with its fortress-like facade. Perkins + Will and interior design firm TEF did away with the monolith’s bleak appearance with the addition of ample glazing and an seven-story-tall atrium that floods the building with natural light . The transformation created a welcoming and collaborative environment that consolidates four government agencies and offers diverse amenities including retail, workspaces, open coffee bars, and even bike storage. Reclaimed timber is used throughout the interior to lend a sense of warmth to the concrete structure. Wood rails were repurposed from the building and nearby sites as was the timber used for stair treads, countertops, and wall finishes. Splashes of greenery enliven the building including a tree well on the sixth floor, garden patio on the eighth floor, and a landscaped garden outside the main public hearing room. Related: Form follows function at Shanghai’s new bioclimatic Natural History Museum Perkins + Will wrote: “As part of a required seismic retrofit, shear walls were introduced at all perimeter walls to reinforce the structure without compromising the opportunity for open offices. Addressing both seismic and daylighting issues, a seven-story atrium was carved out the of the center of the building, both reducing the structural mass of the building and bringing much needed daylight to the building’s interior, decreasing energy use while creating a welcoming atmosphere. The atrium and interconnecting stairs also provide the opportunity for informal encounters between the various agency employees.” + Perkins + Will

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Perkins + Will overhauls a boring concrete warehouse into beautiful LEED Gold offices

A tale of two ‘living’ buildings in the Capitol

July 13, 2017 by  
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Measuring the intangible value of two Living Building Challenge and WELL Building certifications in Washington, D.C.

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A tale of two ‘living’ buildings in the Capitol

Why Kilroy is turning buildings into batteries

July 7, 2017 by  
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Its initial energy storage installations in California, which should be online in 2018, will automate demand response services more seamless for tenants.

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Why Kilroy is turning buildings into batteries

LEED Gold house puts a modern twist on historic Aspen architecture

May 17, 2017 by  
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Architecture firm Rowland + Broughton designed Game On, a stunning modern home sensitive to historic context and the environment in Aspen, Colorado. Crafted as a contemporary take on the West End neighborhood’s late 19th century architecture, the elegant new home uses smart technology to achieve LEED Gold certification. Solar panels power over half of Game On’s energy needs and stormwater management is seamlessly integrated into the design. Since Game On is located in a historic neighborhood, the architects prioritized site context in the design process to achieve approval from the City of Aspen’s Historic Preservation Commission . The original site contained a historic miner’s cabin that the architects preserved but moved to the northwest corner. The relocation allowed the lot to be split in half with the new build located on the southern half. The architects designed the new home with white fiber-cement siding for a clean and contemporary appearance and also added a traditional front porch and gabled roof to reference the neighborhood’s historic context. The 4,291-square-foot home consists of the main dwelling and a detached garage. The home is optimized for entertaining thanks to its open-plan layout that can accommodate a large number of guests. “Pure in form and with modern articulation, it’s modern and efficient with no unused space,” wrote the architects. Related: Black Magic home sits lightly in a mountain oasis The LEED Gold-certified home is outfitted with home automation technology and powered by solar panels mounted on the garage roof. The interior features natural materials , energy-efficient fixtures, and eco-friendly finishes free of harmful chemicals. The house design minimized erosion and site impact during construction. Stormwater runoff is managed onsite and drained into the bocce ball court, which filters the water before it flows to the aquifer. + Rowland + Broughton Via Dezeen Images via Rowland + Broughton

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LEED Gold house puts a modern twist on historic Aspen architecture

Thailands first LEED Platinum vertical village to rise in Bangkok

April 17, 2017 by  
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Thailand’s wealthiest man, Charoen Sirivadhanabhakdi, has teamed up with architecture firm SOM to plan One Bangkok, a $3.5 billion project that will be first in Thailand to target LEED Platinum certification for Neighborhood Development. Located in the heart of the capital next to Lumphini Park, the 16.7-acre mixed-use development is one of the largest private-sector developments in Thailand to date. The “people-centric” project will include luxury amenities, public spaces, and sustainable design technologies to reduce energy use. SOM designed One Bangkok to “foster community and promote well-being in a dense urban environment” using attractive streetscapes, eight acres of public plazas, and a mixed-use program. In addition to public space, the 1.83-million-square-meter project will comprise five Grade-A office towers, five luxury hotels, three luxury residential towers, and retail. An estimated 60,000 people are expected to live and work in the district upon completion in 2025. Related: SOM designs pedestrian-friendly revamp for the heart of Philadelphia To achieve LEED Platinum certification for Neighborhood Development, One Bangkok will centralize energy and water-management systems to maximize efficiency. The landscape optimizes stormwater management efficiency by reducing runoff and retaining rainwater onsite for absorption and return to groundwater. Green spaces are also integrated into the buildings on higher levels, from cascading green terraces to networks of sky gardens. The first stage of One Bangkok is expected to open in 2021. + SOM Renderings via SOM , Diagram via PPtv Thailand

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Thailands first LEED Platinum vertical village to rise in Bangkok

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