Modular design helps UCLA’s Pritzker Hall earn LEED Platinum

November 17, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Modular design helps UCLA’s Pritzker Hall earn LEED Platinum

There’s no better place to ensure a healthy physical and mental environment than at a university undergraduate program for psychology. So when UCLA received $30 million in funding from the Anthony and Jeanne Pritzker Family Foundation, it used the money to renovate the former Franz Hall into the modern and now complete Pritzker Hall.  Pritzker Hall is an eight-story building for students and staff involved in the psychology program. Originally built in 1967 by notable architect Paul Revere Williams, the structure has recently been updated through a collaboration between CO Architects and Tangram Interiors for a vibrant, modern, efficient design that earned LEED Platinum certification for  energy efficiency  and sustainability. Related: Portland State University’s new hall qualifies for LEED gold The team decided to refurbish the building, saving as many usable parts as possible. However, the new design expanded the lobby for an open feel that funnels in abundant  natural light . Due to the height and location, the building was also upgraded with seismic safety improvements. This was achieved via consultation from the university’s engineering department to develop 40 purpose-built dampers that act as shock absorbers for the above-ground floors. Classrooms, spaces to collaborate and research areas were all modernized for ADA accessibility while keeping elements such as the original structural waffle slab on the second floor and  natural materials  such as damaged marble walls and terrazzo flooring that were worked around instead of destroyed.  Throughout the building, energy-efficient LED lighting supplements study and lecture areas. The team incorporated other thoughtful touches like the addition of drought-tolerant  plants  and interior design elements by Tangram, such as student-focused furniture selections. Many of the primary spaces were designed with a modular and flexible design to suit the need for growth and change as the program expands.   “UCLA Psychology students and faculty alike are humbled by the thoughtfully designed Pritzker Hall renovation project,” said Victoria Sork, Dean of Life Sciences. “CO Architects together with Tangram, were able to honor the building’s history while providing the needed cutting-edge facelift. From the collaborative spaces throughout to the newage research labs, the innovative furniture and overall execution of design gives our program renewed confidence as one of the top psychology departments in the United States.” According to a press release, “Pritzker Hall was awarded the Westside Urban Forum Merit Award in the public /institutional category. The project was recognized for its emphasis on collaboration between students and faculty, while elevating the program’s candor and highly sought after psychology programs.” + Tangram Interiors Images via Tangram Interiors

View original post here: 
Modular design helps UCLA’s Pritzker Hall earn LEED Platinum

Is Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade destroying the environment?

November 17, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Is Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade destroying the environment?

Thanksgiving is a day full of family and national traditions. The turkey goes into the oven, family and friends gather and the football lineup is noted. And on televisions across the country, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade streams on the TV. An event that large takes copious planning and coordination, but while it brings an uplifting spirit to the holiday , does it do the same for the planet? Helium Balloons The massive balloons that adorn the parade are a major undertaking. They require nearly 100 handlers each to keep them under control, and they’re not part of the parade during windy days. While they need to be controlled, the balloons are kept afloat by a massive amount of helium. Helium is a completely non-renewable resource, so the natural supply is always on decline. In fact, some estimates say we’ll run out in the next 50 years. During a helium shortage, the parade was put on hold during World War II, missing 1942 to 1944.  Related: Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s to be fur-free by 2021 Recognizing helium is a limited resource, special consideration is given to the gas at the end of each parade. Yet, it’s questionable whether the organizer’s efforts to recapture and recycle the helium after the event is effective. Having said that, even at an extraordinary price tag, the amount of helium used equates to a small percentage of usage for a single day in the country.  As for the material of the balloons themselves, they’ve received an environmental upgrade from the original rubber to a polyurethane fabric that can be upcycled in a variety of ways. However, it’s unclear if this actually happens when a balloon is retired.  Of course, durability is an important factor too. As there are one or two new character balloons added each year, some of them have been in service for decades with no aspirations for retirement.  Environmental awareness has increased over the years and is witnessed in changes throughout the history of the event. For example, balloons used to be released into the air at the end of the parade — a practice that was squashed in the 1930s with consideration for the environment , pilots and the public.  The balloons weren’t always part of the parade. In fact, early on, live animals were borrowed from the local zoo to participate in the festivities. Lions, tigers, bears… Oh my! Really though, speaking strictly from an environmental standpoint, live animals were less impactful than balloons. Yet, they were uninvited from the party after a few years, likely due to safety concerns. Scared children, clean up and inconvenience to others in the parade were other likely contributors in the decision.   Transportation There’s an unavoidable consequence of gathering large groups of people together. After all, just transporting three million people into the area will leave a carbon footprint . Then there’s the trucks required to haul the floats. Fortunately, the warehouse where the floats are built is a short distance from the parade route, so transport emissions remain low there. Not only that, but the location Moonachie, New Jersey was specifically chosen in 2011 and has housed the floats and supplies for the past ten years in the state-of-the-art and LEED-certified facility. Interestingly, this location adds a restriction to the float design. As part of the route into New York City, the floats must be transported through the Lincoln Tunnel. Inasmuch, floats must be no larger than 8.5 feet wide. However, many floats are designed to collapse in order to fit the restriction.  To counterbalance the big trucks in the parade , there are plenty who travel pedestrian style, leaving zero-impact in their wake. For example, there are only twelve bands chosen for the honor each year, all of which walk the entire route.   Macy’s sustainability practices It’s no surprise the organization continues to evolve the parade in alignment with the needs of the planet. Reducing waste and being energy-efficient is engrained in the company mission. The transition has been gradual, but the updates are continual. For example, the company relies on solar energy for many stores and has upgraded to energy-efficient LED lighting throughout most locations.  In the store and through the mail, Macy’s also pays attention to waste , using 100% recycled paper for their shopping bags and minimizing packing materials in the standardized packing cartons that improve transport efficiency, using less trucks and ensuring trucks are full before heading out. Marketing materials are also nearly 100% recycled, and the company is moving to e-bills to cut back paper consumption.  To put it simply While the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is unquestionably integrated into the very fabric of the holiday, no event that large can be completely sustainable.  Overall, considering the number of people involved, the overall impact is miniscule. If you add in the efforts at a corporate level to streamline everyday operations, Macy’s is a company to put on the yes list for eco-conscious shopping. Knowing the effort it puts into maintaining low transport emissions, energy reduction and plastic-free packaging, Macy’s is clearly balancing business with the needs of the environment.  Via Better Homes & Gardens and Earth 911 Images via Unsplash

Read more: 
Is Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade destroying the environment?

Indeed Tower in Austin earns LEED Platinum for green features

September 10, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Indeed Tower in Austin earns LEED Platinum for green features

A new office tower stands tall in Austin , and its sustainability features are breaking records. Indeed Tower, a recently completed AA office tower, earned 82 points toward a LEED v4 Core & Shell (CS) Platinum Certification. Awarded by the U.S. Green Building Council, this certification makes Indeed Tower the second-largest LEED v4 CS project in the U.S. and the fifth-largest in the world, according to a press release. The building spans 730,000 square feet and rises to 36 stories tall. About 35,000 square feet of this project includes the adaptive reuse of the historic Claudia Taylor Johnson post office. Campbell Landscape Architecture and Ten Eyck Landscape Architects contributed to the project’s 17,000 square feet of urban green space. Developed by Trammell Crow Company and Principal Real Estate Investors and helmed by architecture firm Page, this massive project took four years to complete. Related: See how this Austin home enjoys green views without windows “Trammell Crow Company set out more than three years ago to develop an office tower that was designed for the future. Indeed Tower was designed to meet and exceed even the highest standards of sustainability and accommodate the needs of current and future office tenants that demand a modern and evolved workplace,” said Brad Maples, Principal of Trammell Crow Company’s Austin office. Indeed Tower’s sustainable features begin with incorporating open, green spaces. Open space covers 46% of the site with the help of terraces and the large urban plaza. These spaces include plenty of vegetation, 75% of which is native and 25% is drought-tolerant. Water concerns are addressed through on-site rainwater management, low flow plumbing fixtures and EnergyStar appliances. These features help the building save 1.5 million gallons of water annually. The reuse of the existing structure also helps the project reduce 20% of its embodied carbon . In addition to the tower’s LEED Platinum certification, the project also earned Austin Energy Green Building 4-Star certification. A Fitwel 1-Star certification is pending. + Indeed Tower Images courtesy of Albert Vecerka ESTO Photographics and Page

Read more from the original source: 
Indeed Tower in Austin earns LEED Platinum for green features

This giant green wall is a show-stopper a Warsaw skyscraper

September 2, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on This giant green wall is a show-stopper a Warsaw skyscraper

Generation Park Y tower by Stockholm -based project development and construction group Skanska features roughly 49 feet of a gorgeous green wall. Stretching to about 72 feet long, this green wall has more than 6,000 plants of several dozen species stretching up along a huge wall of green. You can find the Generation Park Y office building in Warsaw , where its glass facade lets in light for the flourishing greenery. According to Skanska, this tower is its largest office building yet in Poland. The Generation Park Y tower is an enormous office building. It’s also the greenest skyscraper in the city, currently in the process of LEED Platinum and Building without Barriers certifications. The green wall is a reminder of the tower’s commitment to sustainability. Standing 140 meters (about 450 feet) tall, Generation Park makes it home at Warsaw’s Daszy?ski Roundabout. Related: French offices receive a green update with Benetti MOSS walls The wall is mainly comprised of ferns, philodendrons, monsteras, peace lilies, laceleafs and aglaonemas. These plants purify the air and produce enough oxygen to provide breathable air for 150 people for 24 hours.The arrangement is crafted with a great deal of care. Every plant has its own place in the overall design. The plants are arranged in sections, and the entire design is completely automated so they receive the right amount of nutrients, light and water. Three rows of about 150 “feeding” lights provide for the thousands of plants. Together, the plants create a microclimate that Skanska labels the “ forest effect.” As Skanska said in a project statement, “These types of green solutions create a calming and relaxing effect, draw attention to nature , but also have a positive effect on acoustics, reducing noise levels.” Rafa? Stoparczyk, Skanska’s CEE commercial development business unit’s project manager, added, “At Skanska, we like to focus on unique and original solutions. The idea of ??such a huge wall filled with vegetation sounded like a challenge we wanted to take on. The final effect exceeded our wildest expectations. The wall makes an extraordinary impression both when we are inside the building and when looking from the outside.” + Skanska Images courtesy of Radoslaw NAWROCKI /dla SKANSKA POLSKA

Read more: 
This giant green wall is a show-stopper a Warsaw skyscraper

Ariake Gymnastics Centre resembles a floating ship

September 2, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Ariake Gymnastics Centre resembles a floating ship

The Ariake Gymnastics Centre in Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo Japan was designed for dual uses to provide for both a significant short-term competition and ongoing events. The architectural design, presented by Nikken Sekkei and Shimizu Corporation, relies heavily on  natural materials  for both a sustainable finish and a reflection of the area’s history.  Dubbed, “A Wooden Vessel Floating in the Bay Area,” the Ariake Gymnastics Centre was equipped with a layout meant to house a temporary international sports competition in response to a request by the client, The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games. After the event, the spectator stands were made removable for easy conversion into a permanent exhibition hall. Related: ZHA designs sustainable expansion to China’s largest international exhibition center Nearly every surface is constructed from  wood  — a nod to the district that previously housed a log pond. Timber is used extensively throughout the building, including the roof frame structure, facade, spectator seats and exterior walls. Lightweight, durable and fireproof steel was used for the framing. The finished building looks like a floating wooden vessel from across the waterway.  The wood also caters to the acoustic and thermal needs of the arena and serves to achieve a light overall site impact in an area that may have poor soil conditions. Glued laminate timber has a high capacity for heat, making it fire resistant. The overall simple design honors the essence of traditional Japanese architecture.  The Ariake Gymnastics Centre is located along a canal, allowing for an expansive public space. Although surrounded by nearby residential condominiums , the arena puts a focus on a low design rather than competing with the height of other buildings in the vicinity.  Developers also emphasized taking advantage of outdoor space, with expansive boardwalks along the  water’s  edge. The entryway is kept outside the building instead of being included in the interior space. This allows for a smaller footprint from building materials as well as physical space.  + Nikken Sekkei Ltd. Via ArchDaily Images via Nikken Sekkei Ltd. 

Here is the original: 
Ariake Gymnastics Centre resembles a floating ship

Explore the Saltbox Passive House’s sweet sustainable design

August 20, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Explore the Saltbox Passive House’s sweet sustainable design

The Saltbox Passive House is located in Bromont, Quebec , and is a residence for a family of four. The 3100-square-foot home sits in a meadow at the edge of a 2.5-acre wooded plot. Its design combines elements of the local context with energy-efficient strategies to enhance sustainability while maintaining a modern aesthetic. Through the efforts of the architects from Atelier l’Abri, the contractor Construction Rocket and consultants from the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS), the building has obtained LEED Platinum and PHIUS 2018+ certifications, making it the third certified passive house in Quebec. The architects employed an L-shaped plan with two different roof slopes that mirror the topography of the landscape. The name of the house stems from the architectural language of saltbox buildings, a form of vernacular architecture from New England . The primary characteristic of saltbox houses is a gable roof over the main section of the building with a single-pitch roof over the lower section, making them easy to identify at first glance. Related: Passive House-certified residence frames ski resort views in Utah The Saltbox Passive House comprises three levels, of which the bottom two are tucked into the mountain along the rear retaining wall. The basement level serves as a workshop and houses a garage. The ground level includes shared spaces for the family. This includes living and dining spaces, which are organized around a double-height volume encompassing the kitchen, pantry, mudroom and powder room. This volume extends to the top level and is adjacent to the passageway that leads to the private spaces, including the three bedrooms and a home office. Throughout the design process, the architects collaborated with consultants to ensure that the project met Passivhaus Institut standards. Established in the early 1980s in Germany, the institute promotes buildings that consider occupant comfort while maintaining high levels of energy efficiency. This is often achieved through the use of well-insulated interiors, extensive heat recovery from mechanical ventilation systems and conscious design of openings for thermal comfort. Several design choices were made to ensure high performance without compromising comfort and aesthetics. The house incorporates south-facing, triple-glazed UPVC openings to capture sunlight and frame views of the lush landscape while serving as a means of passive solar heating. Close attention to materiality has further reduced the building’s carbon footprint. Cellulose insulation, excavated stone for the retaining wall and cedar cladding are all readily available in the region and aid in keeping the house thermally insulated. Though the building is connected to public electricity systems and utilities, its enhanced environmentally friendly measures reduce dependence on these facilities. + L’Abri Photography by Raphaël Thibodeau

Original post: 
Explore the Saltbox Passive House’s sweet sustainable design

Habitat for Humanity develops its first 3D-printed home in US

July 22, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Habitat for Humanity develops its first 3D-printed home in US

Habitat for Humanity is a long-standing nonprofit whose mission is to provide affordable home ownership to low-income families around the world. Currently, that includes areas of the United States where affordable housing is in short supply. In Tempe, Arizona, Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona is building its first 3D-printed home on American soil. “This is really a moonshot opportunity for Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona,” said Jason Barlow, president and CEO of Habitat Central Arizona. “When we consider the housing issues facing Arizona, the need for affordable homeownership solutions becomes clear. If we can deliver decent, affordable, more energy-efficient homes at less cost, in less time and with less waste, we think that could be a real game-changer. Just think of the implications.” Related: You can rent the world’s first 3D-printed Airbnb tiny home While the current build is a single residence that will house an approved family, the goal is to use the innovative technology to provide sustainable, scalable, low-cost housing across Arizona and other areas of the country. The home, perched above Clark Park, will be a three-bedroom, two-bathroom single-story dwelling when it is complete. The project is actually a bit of a hybrid, with around 75% of the building being 3D-printed and the rest constructed in standard ways. However, the use of the Build on Demand Printer (BOD 2) by the Germany-based PERI Group speeds up the process, which began in May 2021. Construction is expected to wrap up in early fall of this year. “While we have found success in building small 3D-printed homes abroad, at 1,700 square feet, this home represents Habitat’s entry into new, innovative space. It is the first of its kind in the U.S. and sets the stage for increased capacity through a solution that could be both sustainable and cost-effective ,” said Adrienne Goolsby, senior vice president of U.S. and Canada at Habitat for Humanity International, in a statement. The 3D-printing process equates to less expensive building supplies, which results in an overall lower project cost. Relying on the automated technology also reduces construction waste. Furthering the goal toward more sustainable building practices, Habitat Central Arizona is aiming to qualify for LEED Platinum certification along with IBHS FORTIFIED Home designation. Goolsby said, “We’re proud of Habitat Central Arizona’s research and progress using this new technology , and will continue to assess its potential to be scaled and more widely adopted so that we can further address the critical issue of home affordability in the U.S.” + Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona Via Tech Plus Images via Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona

Originally posted here:
Habitat for Humanity develops its first 3D-printed home in US

Solar-powered Noe Hill Smarthome is an eco-friendly dream in San Francisco

October 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered Noe Hill Smarthome is an eco-friendly dream in San Francisco

The LEED Platinum -certified Noe Hill Smart Ecohome marries state-of-the-art green technology and the indoor-outdoor lifestyle that urban dwellers dream about. The house, designed by EAG Studio , creates a healthy living environment with plenty of natural light, native plant gardens, rain catchment, solar power and a bevy of smart features to optimize power use. The house occupies a coveted site near the crest of the Collingwood hill in San Francisco . It spans three levels and comprises 5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths (with 3 bedrooms ensuite on the upper floor), media room, gym, flexible use 2-room guest suite, an open main level floor plan, 4 distinct outdoor living areas and 2-car independent parking. Related: Sunset’s Green Dream Home in San Francisco The dramatic vistas open up from the main living room and dining area connected to a sunny deck and a landscaped garden. The garden features drought-tolerant , native plantings. Retractable glass doors in the kitchen open directly to the deck and enhances the experience of the indoor-outdoor lifestyle. A sculptural staircase leads to the upper level and receives natural light from the skylight above. The bedrooms occupy the upper floor, with the luxurious master suite openning to its own view deck ideal for a morning cup of coffee or casual lounging. The staircase leads further up toward the roof deck with multiple dining and lounging areas perfect for entertaining guests. Related: San Francisco’s Solar “Mission: House” is a High-Tech Marvel A rainwater harvesting system captures most of the roof/surface water for landscaping irrigation. All exterior walls are insulated and optimized for energy efficiency, while a solar array provides renewable energy for the building. These systems, along with LED lighting , occupancy sensors and the use of reclaimed building materials make this building a modern and truly eco-friendly home. + Noe Hill Leed Home + EAG Studio

Read more here: 
Solar-powered Noe Hill Smarthome is an eco-friendly dream in San Francisco

LEED-seeking illumina i3 campus lets workers work anywhere

August 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on LEED-seeking illumina i3 campus lets workers work anywhere

San Diego’s new BioMed Realty i3 campus is raising the bar for corporate research parks everywhere. Perkins+Will recently designed the iconic science and research campus that’s on track for LEED Platinum certification and exemplifies the “work anywhere” culture. Filled with natural light and topped with green roofs, this environmentally progressive design features a wide variety of energy saving measures and reduces energy and water use by 30 and 20 percent. Located off Interstate 805, the Biotech Hub is the new home of leading genomics research and life sciences company illumina . The campus comprises three trapezoidal, all-white concrete buildings punctuated with landscaped gathering spaces, as well as a 33,500-square-foot outdoor courtyard at the campus heart that includes a performance stage, bocce ball court, herb garden, fitness area, restaurant, and cafe. Parking is hidden underground. Connectivity and collaboration are major themes of the campus design—i3 is 100 percent wireless—and employees are encouraged to work anywhere on campus they feel most comfortable at any time of the day. “The campus turns the stereotypical concept of a suburban research park right on its head, and makes it infinitely better,” said Ryan Bussard, principal at Perkins+Will. “Instead of a trove of uninviting office buildings surrounding a sea of asphalt parking lots, the i3 campus empowers people to connect, engage, collaborate, innovate, and—perhaps most important—be inspired.” Floor-to-ceiling glass lets in ample natural light and frames views of the surrounding mountains. Collaborative areas, such as the lounges and conference rooms, are connected directly to outdoor terraces . A variety of workspaces can accommodate different work styles and preferences. Related: World’s greenest and healthiest office crowned in Washington, D.C. The i3 campus is on track to earn LEED Platinum certification for the core and shell, while LEED Gold is expected for the interiors. The campus’ on-site fuel cells generate clean energy, while energy usage is minimized thanks to access to natural light, motorized and fixed sunshades, and energy-efficient fixtures. Responsible water management is a big part of the campus design. Recycled water sourced from a local utility irrigates the site and is used for cooling towers. Green roofs planted with heat- and drought-tolerated native plants filter and reduce stormwater runoff in conjunction with the on-site bio-filtration system and permeable pavers. Site-water mitigation tucked beneath the courtyard also helps reduce burden on the city’s local infrastructure. + Perkins+Will

See the original post here: 
LEED-seeking illumina i3 campus lets workers work anywhere

Various Architects turn an industrial Oslo building into contemporary offices

August 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Various Architects turn an industrial Oslo building into contemporary offices

A historic building in Oslo’s locomotive industrial zone has been transformed into contemporary offices filled with natural light. This adaptive reuse project, called Lokomotivstallen, has been praised as a positive example of recycling and historical restoration in the city. Designed by Various Architects , the modern offices house the rail-based intermodal company CargoNet. The 3,000-square-foot building has a peculiar rectangular footprint that’s much longer than it is wide with a 205-meter-long facade and seven-meter width. To break the structure’s narrow monotony and to widen the footprint of the floors, the architects inserted timber boxes into the facade. Meeting rooms are located in the wooden boxes. The timber additions are of varying sizes and heights, and each are faced with a south-facing floor-to-ceiling glazed wall to let in maximum daylight. The largest wooden box houses the cafeteria that serves as the building’s central meeting area. Related: Various Architect’s Stunning Collapsible Stadium The original brick facade was preserved although the interior was largely gutted to make way for the modern office spaces . A new elevator tower that connects all the floors is also clad in brick and topped with a trademark railway clock. The office building comprises eighty desks distributed between five open landscape areas and can be rearranged to fit different needs. Micro spaces are interspersed throughout the office and provide quieter private working spaces. + Various Architects Images by Ibrahim Elhayawan, Dawid Nowak

View original post here:
Various Architects turn an industrial Oslo building into contemporary offices

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 6694 access attempts in the last 7 days.