Passive House-certified development offers affordable housing in South Bronx

June 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Passive House-certified development offers affordable housing in South Bronx

New York City-based Curtis + Ginsberg Architects has completed Park Avenue Green, the largest Passive House development in North America that is inspirational in more ways than one. Designed in collaboration with energy consultant Bright Tower, the building is an energy powerhouse and a new affordable housing community with 154 apartments for low- and extremely low-income households — including 35 units reserved for people who were formerly homeless — in the Melrose neighborhood of the South Bronx. An airtight envelope, energy-efficient appliances and a rooftop solar array have reduced the building’s energy consumption by about 70% of the code-required standards, earning the project certification by the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS). Completed in February 2019, Park Avenue Green has been crafted as a new neighborhood landmark with a 4,300-square-foot community facility on the ground floor. This facility currently houses affordable visual art studies and gallery space for Spaceworks, a nonprofit that provides low-cost spaces for artists. The ground floor also includes a bicycle room and community room for residents. Related: Are these zero-carbon domes the future of sustainable housing? To achieve the stringent energy standards set by PHIUS, the design team outfitted the building with a 34-kilowatt photovoltaic system , a cogeneration scheme, individual VRF heating and cooling units and efficient energy recovery units (ERV) in each apartment. Residents’ comfort and well-being are optimized thanks to these measures and abundant access to natural light that is let in through triple-glazed windows. Park Avenue Green also incorporates storm resiliency and other energy conservation strategies for long-term durability. “We are very excited to be part of the Park Avenue Green team, bringing the largest PHIUS Passive House Project to fruition creating much-needed affordable housing will the smallest possible carbon footprint,” said Mark Ginsberg, partner at Curtis + Ginsberg Architects. The $48.4 million Park Avenue Green project was developed by Omni New York, which also led the creation of the LEED Gold-certified Morris Avenue Apartments in the Bronx .  + Curtis + Ginsberg Architects Photography by John Bartelstone via Curtis + Ginsberg Architects

The rest is here:
Passive House-certified development offers affordable housing in South Bronx

Charles Library boasts one of Pennsylvania’s largest green roofs

May 20, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Charles Library boasts one of Pennsylvania’s largest green roofs

Contemporary, sustainable and welcoming, Temple University’s new Charles Library in Philadelphia raises the bar for research libraries around the world. Completed by  Snøhetta  for $135 million in 2019, the new LEED Gold-targeted Charles Library is not only a beacon of energy-efficient design, but also integrates a diversity of collaborative and social learning spaces that are typically left out of traditional research libraries. The new library also boasts a 47,300-square-foot green roof — one of the largest in Pennsylvania — that covers over 70% of the building’s roof surface and is part of a stormwater management system designed to manage all rainwater runoff on the approximately three-acre site, plus an additional acre of off-site impervious ground.  Built to replace the Paley Library, the Charles Library offers more than double the number of study spaces compared to its 1960s predecessor. The 220,000-square-foot  library  is located at the intersection of two major pedestrian pathways, Polett Walk and Liacouras Walk, and responds to its high-traffic location with an inviting public-facing design that includes generous plazas sloping up to the library entrances. Large expanses of glazing and grand wooden arched entrances cut into the split-faced granite facade help emphasize a welcoming atmosphere. Inside, the building is centered on a large domed atrium lobby that offers views of every corner of the building. Natural light is a key feature of the new library, particularly on the sun-filled fourth floor where visitors are encouraged to wander through stacks of the library’s browsable collection. The fourth floor also looks out on views of the lush  green roof  and gardens, which are planted with over 15 different species to provide a rich urban habitat for pollinators.  Related: LEED Gold-targeted library and community park has otherworldly appeal The 47,300-square-foot green roof is part of the library’s  stormwater management  system that also includes pervious paved plazas and paths as well as landscaped planting beds. Rainwater that infiltrates these permeable surfaces are directed into two underground catchment basins that can store and process nearly half a million gallons of water during storm events.  + Snøhetta Images © Michael Grimm

See the rest here:
Charles Library boasts one of Pennsylvania’s largest green roofs

Pittsburghs MuseumLab for children achieves LEED Gold

May 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Pittsburghs MuseumLab for children achieves LEED Gold

MuseumLab, one of Pittsburgh’s most creative and innovative youth learning spaces, has earned LEED Gold a year after the project was completed in the recently renovated 1890 Carnegie Library, which is located in the city’s North Side neighborhood. Santa Monica-based Koning Eizenberg Architecture led the design of the energy-efficient adaptive reuse project that now serves as a beacon for sustainability, historic preservation and community investment. Part interactive museum and part learning lab, the MuseumLab was developed by the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, which received LEED Silver in 2006, to offer a variety of innovative activities for kids aged 10 and above for experimenting with art and technology. The new space hosts three labs: the Studio Lab for art; the Make Lab that comprises woodworking and metalworking equipment as well as CNC routers and laser cutters; and the Tech Lab that teaches children coding, augmented reality and video game design. The MuseumLab also has program and rental spaces, commissioned artworks, unique camps, workshops and after-school activities. Related: The net-zero Frick Environmental Center is officially one of the world’s greenest buildings In renovating the 130-year-old Carnegie Library, the architects sought to preserve and expose as much of the original 1890 archways, columns and mosaic floors as possible while bolstering the building’s energy efficiency. As a result, deteriorated plaster was sensitively rehabilitated with thermal plaster patching rather than demolished altogether. Windows were reinstated to bring greater amounts of natural light to the interiors to highlight the many historic details and new contemporary art brought into the space. “The work of innovative building projects like MuseumLab is a fundamental driving force in transforming the way our buildings are built, designed and operated,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, president and CEO of U.S. Green Building Council. “Buildings that achieve LEED certification are lowering carbon emissions , reducing operating costs and conserving resources while prioritizing sustainable practices and human health. Because of MuseumLab, we are increasing the number of green buildings and getting closer to USGBC’s goal to outpace conventional buildings, while being environmentally and socially responsible and improving quality of life for generations to come.” + Koning Eizenberg Architecture Photography by Erik Staudenmaier via Koning Eizenberg Architecture

More: 
Pittsburghs MuseumLab for children achieves LEED Gold

Pittsburghs MuseumLab for children achieves LEED Gold

May 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Pittsburghs MuseumLab for children achieves LEED Gold

MuseumLab, one of Pittsburgh’s most creative and innovative youth learning spaces, has earned LEED Gold a year after the project was completed in the recently renovated 1890 Carnegie Library, which is located in the city’s North Side neighborhood. Santa Monica-based Koning Eizenberg Architecture led the design of the energy-efficient adaptive reuse project that now serves as a beacon for sustainability, historic preservation and community investment. Part interactive museum and part learning lab, the MuseumLab was developed by the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, which received LEED Silver in 2006, to offer a variety of innovative activities for kids aged 10 and above for experimenting with art and technology. The new space hosts three labs: the Studio Lab for art; the Make Lab that comprises woodworking and metalworking equipment as well as CNC routers and laser cutters; and the Tech Lab that teaches children coding, augmented reality and video game design. The MuseumLab also has program and rental spaces, commissioned artworks, unique camps, workshops and after-school activities. Related: The net-zero Frick Environmental Center is officially one of the world’s greenest buildings In renovating the 130-year-old Carnegie Library, the architects sought to preserve and expose as much of the original 1890 archways, columns and mosaic floors as possible while bolstering the building’s energy efficiency. As a result, deteriorated plaster was sensitively rehabilitated with thermal plaster patching rather than demolished altogether. Windows were reinstated to bring greater amounts of natural light to the interiors to highlight the many historic details and new contemporary art brought into the space. “The work of innovative building projects like MuseumLab is a fundamental driving force in transforming the way our buildings are built, designed and operated,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, president and CEO of U.S. Green Building Council. “Buildings that achieve LEED certification are lowering carbon emissions , reducing operating costs and conserving resources while prioritizing sustainable practices and human health. Because of MuseumLab, we are increasing the number of green buildings and getting closer to USGBC’s goal to outpace conventional buildings, while being environmentally and socially responsible and improving quality of life for generations to come.” + Koning Eizenberg Architecture Photography by Erik Staudenmaier via Koning Eizenberg Architecture

Read the rest here:
Pittsburghs MuseumLab for children achieves LEED Gold

Solar-powered innovation center targets LEED Gold in Toronto

April 8, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Solar-powered innovation center targets LEED Gold in Toronto

Sustainability, indigenous culture and contemporary design come together in Perkins and Will’s design for the new $85 million Centre for Innovation, Technology and Entrepreneurship (CITE) at Seneca College’s Newnham Campus. Created in collaboration with the First Peoples@Seneca Office, the LEED Gold-targeted building features indigenous-led design and services, such as counseling and financial aid, as part of Seneca’s commitment to the Indigenous Education Protocol. In addition to cultural responsiveness, CITE is home to state-of-the-art engineering and robotics labs as well as an entrepreneurial incubator for students and industry leaders. Located on the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the 274,000-square-foot CITE building integrates messaging about indigenous teachings and history throughout, from the punctuated terracotta panels lining the facade that reference Anishinaabe birchbark ‘memory chests’ to the vibrant, indigenous-inspired interior artwork. The relationship between these Indigenous stories with the building’s academic programs are visualized in eight graphic murals created in collaboration with design firm Bruce Mau Design that include a hoop dance, a pow wow, DNA sequencing and a map of the Internet. Related: Perkins + Will’s KTTC building blends beauty and sustainability in Ontario To achieve LEED Gold standards, Perkins and Will wrapped the building in glass to promote reliance on natural light rather than artificial sources. The facade’s punctuated terracotta boxes as well as the south-facing structural colonnade — held up by 13 columns representative of the 13 moons of the lunar cycle — help deflect unwanted solar gain. CITE also features a building integrated solar array, stormwater management cisterns, a biodiverse landscape design, locally sourced, recycled materials wherever possible and increased use of FSC-certified wood finishes for lowered embodied carbon. “CITE presented the perfect opportunity to show how Indigenous knowledge can guide post-secondary education. To provide a more sustainable vision for future innovation, we paired themes like the Internet, space exploration and coding with Indigenous knowledge spanning seven generations,” said Andrew Frontini, principal and design director at Perkins and Will’s Toronto studio. “We organized the structural order of the building elements of the building to support these theme. As you walk through CITE, you encounter overlapping Indigenous and technological stories that initially might speak to different audiences, but over time our hope is that they merge together as one.” + Perkins and Will Images by doublespace photography

Read more:
Solar-powered innovation center targets LEED Gold in Toronto

ZHA unveils LEED Gold-targeted OPPO headquarters in Shenzhen

February 3, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on ZHA unveils LEED Gold-targeted OPPO headquarters in Shenzhen

Zaha Hadid Architects has won an international competition to design Chinese tech giant OPPO’s new headquarters in Shenzhen, China. Defined by the firm’s signature curvilinear features, the new office complex will comprise four interconnected towers with rounded shapes evocative of giant missiles. Wrapped in glass and filled with natural light, the tapered towers will target LEED Gold certification and are expected to break ground later this year, with completion planned in early 2025. Since launching its first phone in 2008, OPPO has grown to become China’s leading smartphone manufacturer and the fifth largest worldwide with over 40,000 employees in more than 40 countries. The new headquarters in Shenzhen reflects this meteoric growth and the company’s investment in innovative research with its futuristic design. The architects have developed the architectural design with 3D Building Information Modeling (BIM) and energy management systems to optimize efficiencies. Related: ZHA completes LEED Gold-targeted building with world’s largest atrium in Beijing Spanning an area of 185,000 square meters, the new OPPO headquarters will reach a height of 200 meters and 42 floors in its tallest tower. Two towers connected by a 20-story vertical lobby will comprise flexible, open-plan office spaces and will be flanked by two external service towers housing vertical circulation. The towers are oriented for optimal views over Shenzhen Bay — a 10th-floor Sky Plaza and rooftop Sky Lab will provide publicly accessible viewing areas — and are tapered inward at the bottom to make room for large civic spaces at street level that will include a landscaped plaza, art gallery, shops, restaurants and a direct link to a nearby subway station. “Locating the towers’ service cores externally frees the center of each floor from obstructions, providing uninterrupted views throughout the building that will enhance interaction between employees,” the firm explained in a statement. “Large atrium spaces unite all occupants through visual connectivity, helping to foster collaboration between different departments of the company. The abundance of natural light, varied working environments and diversity of routes for staff and visitors to move through the building are all conducive to creative engagement and spontaneity.” + Zaha Hadid Architects Images via Zaha Hadid Architects

More here: 
ZHA unveils LEED Gold-targeted OPPO headquarters in Shenzhen

COBE unveils images of LEED Gold-targeted Adidas HQ in Germany

January 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on COBE unveils images of LEED Gold-targeted Adidas HQ in Germany

After a year of operation, sportswear titan Adidas has finally released images of its new LEED Gold-seeking headquarters building in Herzogenaurach, Germany. Designed by Danish architecture firm COBE , the multipurpose building optimizes the work environment with a strong indoor-outdoor connection achieved with walls of glass, soaring skylights and an abundance of greenery throughout the building. Fittingly named HALFTIME, the versatile facility marks COBE’s first completed project in Germany. COBE’s HALFTIME design was selected as the winner of an international architecture competition held by Adidas in 2014. The facility, which officially opened October 12, 2018, is located in the sports brand’s corporate headquarters, “World of Sports,” in southern Germany. The 15,500-square-meter building includes a canteen for all HQ employees, meeting rooms, a conference center , a show room, a large events hall in the style of an old-school gym and 12 creatively styled workshop rooms, each representative of a different sport venue. The building also includes specially designed HALFTIME Chairs, a collaboration between COBE and Danish design brand HAY. Related: Copenhagen’s new eco-friendly “bicycle hills” hide parking for thousands of bicycles To meet LEED Gold standards, the energy-efficient building is topped with a 8,650-square-meter rhomboid roof structure that is covered in glass to flood the interiors with natural light. Large green walls , tall ceilings, a natural materials palette and indoor conservatories cultivate a healthy working environment. Moreover, the architecture features a flexible design for future modifications. “To accommodate the many internal and public functions that HALFTIME includes, we designed a versatile, multipurpose building that brings as many of the company’s activities and functions as possible together under one roof,” said Dan Stubbergaard, architect and founder of COBE. “The huge rhomboid roof covers the entire building like a carpet, bringing staff, visitors and brand ambassadors together in the same building and thus enabling more and wider contacts.” + COBE Images via Rasmus Hjortshøj – COAST / COBE

Read more: 
COBE unveils images of LEED Gold-targeted Adidas HQ in Germany

This is one of the only LEED Gold-certified hotels in Spain

November 20, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This is one of the only LEED Gold-certified hotels in Spain

Opened in March 2018 and located in Madrid, Spain, the VP Plaza España Design hotel is committed to sustainability efforts in both its design and daily practices. The hotel implements recycling and solid waste management programs and even continuous education on sustainable operation practices for the staff as well as incentives for guests to reduce their environmental impact. The hotel is one of the few in its country to earn LEED Gold certification as a mark of excellence from the U.S. Green Building Council. The 5-star hotel was able to secure the coveted certification with its high scores in sustainable setting, design, water and energy use efficiency and use of quality materials and resources. Related: LEED Gold eco hotel in the Wine Country was built using reclaimed wood The hotel has implemented several measures to reduce energy consumption. These include thermal enclosures and installations, a lighting and energy system with motion detectors to save energy when the lights aren’t in use, daylight sensors to measure and adjust electric lighting and window sensors that open and close window shades depending on the daylight. In terms of water efficiency, the hotel has selected plants for its outdoor landscaping that require less irrigation. Systems throughout the property monitor water consumption and bathrooms while using high-efficiency fixtures and fittings, such as dual-flush toilets and low-flow showers. These environmental initiatives have reduced water consumption by nearly 33 percent. The building monitors outdoor air ventilation levels, and intelligent controls are utilized for lighting and thermal systems. To further support high air quality inside the hotel, the design team used low-VOC paints. Additionally, the hotel sourced building materials locally, including the furniture and artwork, with wood sourced from responsibly managed forests . This focus on materials supports local economic growth while minimizing the environmental footprint. The general manager of VP Plaza España Design, Francisco Garcia de Oro, has high hopes that the hotel can become an example for sustainability throughout Spain . “For us, being environmentally responsible is not an option but an obligation. We hope to continue to raise the bar in sustainable tourism and will continue to seek ways to improve our operation every day.” + VP Plaza España Design Images via VP Plaza España Design

View original post here:
This is one of the only LEED Gold-certified hotels in Spain

BIGs LEED Gold-seeking school in Arlington features a cascade of green terraces

November 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on BIGs LEED Gold-seeking school in Arlington features a cascade of green terraces

After five years in the making, BIG has completed The Heights, a new public school building in Arlington, Virginia that not only offers a unique and energy-efficient take on school architecture, but also helps maximize density and open space. Located along the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor, The Heights combines two existing secondary schools into a new 180,000-square-foot building that opens like a fan with a cascade of green-roofed terraces to provide an indoor-outdoor learning landscape. An emphasis on natural daylighting, green space, material reuse and energy efficiency has put the building on track to achieve LEED Gold certification . Completed on a $100 million budget, the dynamic new school building houses two programs: the H-B Woodlawn Program that offers visual and performing arts-focused curricula for grades 6 through 12, and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Program that serves students aged 11 to 22 with special needs. The school can accommodate an expected enrollment of up to 775 students. Related: Rammed earth Kopila Valley School is the “greenest school in Nepal” To make the most of a compact urban site bounded by roads on three sides, BIG organized the school as a stack of five rectangular floorplates rotated around a fixed pivot point to create a series of outdoor green-roofed terraces connected with a rotating central staircase. The spacious first terrace can be used for special events while the upper terraces are more suitable as classroom and study areas. The classroom “bars” have also informed the interior layout, which is anchored by a central vertical core containing the elevators, stairs and bathrooms as well as a triple-height lobby with stepped seating on the ground floor. For easy accessibility and to encourage public interaction throughout the school, the lobby is directly adjacent to many of the school’s common spaces, such as the 400-seat auditorium , main gymnasium, library, reception and cafeteria. Intuitive wayfinding is also extended to the classroom spaces in that each classroom “bar” is defined by its own color used to paint the walls and lockers. In contrast to its colorful interior, The Heights’ exterior is clad in white glazed brick to unify its fanned-out massing and to respect the surroundings, including the historic architecture of Old Town Alexandria. Select materials from the former Wilson School, which The Heights was built to replace, have been salvaged and reused in the new build. + BIG Photography by Laurian Ghinitoiu via BIG

View original post here:
BIGs LEED Gold-seeking school in Arlington features a cascade of green terraces

Controversial climate change-inspired skyscraper could become Czech Republics tallest building

October 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Controversial climate change-inspired skyscraper could become Czech Republics tallest building

Inspired by the apocalyptic imagery from climate change projections, sculptor David ?erný and architect Tomáš Císa? from the studio Black n´ Arch have proposed a visually striking skyscraper that’s sparked controversy with its inclusion of an enormous shipwreck-like structure. Dubbed the TOP TOWER , the project proposed for Prague rises to a height of 450 feet, which means that if built, the tower would be the tallest building in the Czech Republic. The project is led by developer Trigema who aims to create a multifunctional, LEED Gold high-rise that includes rental apartments, a public observation area and commercial uses on the lower floors. TOP TOWER has been proposed to be located near the metro station Nové Butovice on the new nearly one-kilometer-long pedestrian zone in Prague. This location is outside of the protected urban conservation zone and would be far enough away from the city center that it would not disrupt the historic city skyline. Taking advantage of its height, the building would offer a public observation area at the highest point of the building where visitors can enjoy a 360-degree panoramic view of Prague .  Rental housing will make up the majority of the mixed-use TOP TOWER, while offices, retail and a multifunctional cultural center will be located on the lower levels. Parking will be tucked underground. The rusty shipwreck-like sculpture integrated into the building will offer opportunities for outdoor spaces and additional landscaping. Related: Computer modeling informed the whimsical design of this experimental home “We have been preparing the TOP TOWER project for more than two years and the final version was preceded by eight other alternative solutions. During this time, we have collected and are still collecting suggestions from experts, state and local authorities, and of course the local public, whose representatives have already been and will continue to hold a number of participatory meetings,” says Marcel Soural, Chairman of the Board of Trigema a.s. Trigema estimates that the construction for TOP TOWER will begin in 2021 and take less than three years complete.  + TOP TOWER Images via Trigema

See the original post: 
Controversial climate change-inspired skyscraper could become Czech Republics tallest building

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1202 access attempts in the last 7 days.