The 1970s brick Upside-Down House gets an eco-friendly refresh

July 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The 1970s brick Upside-Down House gets an eco-friendly refresh

Melbourne-based Inbetween Architecture has breathed new life into a dark and tired 1970s double brick home in Kew, Australia. Nicknamed the Upside-Down House, the gut-renovation includes a dramatically transformed interior with a focus on natural daylight and energy efficiency . In addition to increased daylighting with skylights and adherence to passive solar principles, the remodeled home was fitted with energy-saving LED lighting, hydronic heating, improved insulation and solar-powered ventilators. When Inbetween Architecture was tapped for the project, the team debated between renovating and knocking the structure down to start anew. After weighing the environmental and cost benefits, however, the architects decided to retain the existing house, which was structurally sound but extremely dated and depressingly dark. As a result, they focused on bringing natural light into the home. Since the ground floor receives less access to daylight , the team decided to flip the ground floor and the first floor programming by placing the bedrooms on the ground floor and the communal living areas in the light-filled first floor — thus giving rise to the home’s nickname, the “Upside-Down House.” “The favorite part of our renovations is without question the soaring cathedral-like skylights that not only brought light in, but created space above without impacting on the roofline,” said the client, a young family of four. “Visually, our house flowed from room to room with the feature stair-case leading directly to the open tallow-wood living areas lit up by the northern sun. This flow continued to the outdoors with the clever relocation of an outdoor balcony to link to the previously isolated pool-area allowing for an expansive out-door entertaining area second to none.” Related: Smart Home targets affordability and eco-friendly design in Australia The architects replaced the home’s original seven “closet”-sized bedrooms with four spacious bedrooms. The interior design follows a minimalist aesthetic with hidden storage to avoid clutter. Created to meet a six-star energy rating, the home takes advantage of thermal mass from the existing concrete slabs on both floors and the externally insulated double brick walls. Long roof eaves and new dual shading help mitigate solar gain . + Inbetween Architecture Images by Tatjana Plitt and Nick Stephenson

Go here to see the original: 
The 1970s brick Upside-Down House gets an eco-friendly refresh

Glowing labyrinth made from plastic waste pops up in Buenos Aires

June 22, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Glowing labyrinth made from plastic waste pops up in Buenos Aires

Over 15,000 plastic bottles were temporarily given a new lease on life as a glowing labyrinth in Vatican Square, one of Buenos Aires’ most celebrated public spaces. Designed by environmental art collective Luzinterruptus , the Plastic Waste Labyrinth calls attention to the staggering amount of waste generated everyday in a thought-provoking installation. Commissioned by the Department of Environmental and Public Areas of Buenos Aires City Government, Ciudad Verde, the immersive artwork was installed for one week and open 24 hours a day as part of Global Recycling Day. Previously installed in Madrid and Katowice, the Plastic Waste Labyrinth is a site-specific piece constructed from waste collected from the surrounding area. To show which beverage brands generate the highest amount of waste in Buenos Aires, the architects left the bottle labels on. More than 15,000 plastic bottles were collected from the city with the help of several urban recycling cooperatives. After the plastic bottles were cleaned and sorted into clear plastic bags , Luzinterruptus built a labyrinth that stretches over 650 feet in length and covers an area of 1,550 square feet. “We created an immersive labyrinthine piece where visitors would feel disoriented and anxiously look for an exit,” explained the arts collective. “This experience intended to beget a thought, a conversation, or perhaps an intention to improve our way to use or get rid of plastic. We want to take the opportunity here to bring attention to the uncontrolled use of bottled liquids which is causing great problems in poor countries while reservoirs are being privatized and bought by large corporations and their selfish interests, thus owning water, Earth’s most important resource and a fundamental right of all its inhabitants.” Related: Giant glowing bottle walls light up Singapore for “plastic binge” awareness The labyrinth is illuminated with cool white LEDs that turn the labyrinth into a glowing space at night. At the end of the event, the Plastic Waste Labyrinth was dismantled and all the plastic was recycled. The bottles, cleaned and sorted by color, were sent back to the city’s recycling cooperatives, while the bags were returned to the manufacturing plant, where they would be melted. + Luzinterruptus Images via Luzinterruptus

Continued here:
Glowing labyrinth made from plastic waste pops up in Buenos Aires

These stunning student housing apartments are inspired by tiny homes

June 4, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on These stunning student housing apartments are inspired by tiny homes

Student housing has come a long way since the days of crowding two roommates into a confined space with a couple of beds and a single desk. Case in point: this impressive student housing complex designed by Amsterdam-based firm Standard Studio  that uses the principles of tiny home living . Located in Rotterdam, the Hermes City Plaza apartments offer 218 beautiful 200-square-feet units incorporated with various multi-functional and ultra-efficient features. The purpose of the project was to create housing for first year Erasmus students who are new to the city. Looking to go beyond the usual cramped and cold student housing , the architects decided to create a series of independently functioning units, which are all less than 200 square feet. Inspired by the  tiny home movement , these apartments feature space efficiency, natural light and smart storage. Related: Why these floating dorms made from shipping containers are the future of cheap student housing Each unit comes with a fully equipped living space, meaning there is a full kitchen and bathroom. No more flip-flopping it to the typical shared community bathrooms! The apartments have an open layout that connects the living room to a small kitchenette and dining area. Space efficiency was essential at every step and forced the designers to get creative. There wasn’t enough room to put a full sink in the kitchen, so the team installed one large sink that straddles the kitchen and the bathroom. A half-partition that separates the two spaces pulls double duty as a mirror for the bathroom and a chalkboard for the kitchen. All the cabinetry was custom-built out of renewable bamboo , and LED strips light up the space when natural light isn’t available. The design takes advantage of vertical space with high ceilings and a sleeping loft . The loft is reached by stairs and has built-in closets and shelving. In fact, most of the apartments’ furnishings provide dual functionalities. The living room, for example, has one large multipurpose unit that incorporates a sofa, a desk and storage. The space offers students a feel of independent living, but there are some shared amenities meant to foster a strong sense of community. Residents can enjoy a rooftop terrace , music room, TV rooms, a laundry area and a communal study area. + Standard Studio Via Treehugger Images via Standard Studio

Originally posted here: 
These stunning student housing apartments are inspired by tiny homes

A 1940s home gets an energy-efficient renovation for $250K

June 4, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A 1940s home gets an energy-efficient renovation for $250K

When the homeowners of a small, Cape Cod-style home in Arlington Heights, Illinois wanted extra room for their growing family, they turned to DII Architecture for help. The design/build firm not only added a second floor, but also oversaw a complete revamp of the ground floor. Conceived with a modern farmhouse aesthetic, the Wilke House is now flooded with natural light and features an airy, spacious interior that’s more energy-efficient than before thanks to a new suite of low-energy additions. Located on a large three-quarter-acre lot, the 2,150-square-foot home was refreshed with new white siding and a roof clad in Owens Corning shingles . The original Cape Cod attic was demolished and replaced with a new second floor with room for a double-height dining and meeting area that can be seen from above thanks to a new catwalk, which has Feeney DesignRail railings. Although the budget didn’t allow for a standing seam metal roof, the Wilke House makes its modern farmhouse influences evident through the material palette of warm woods matched with crisp white paint, extruded window elements, and indoor daylighting. “This project has quite a few sustainable elements,” says DII Architecture. “During the demo phase, we preserved as much of the first floor as possible, included old nominal 2×4 studs and white oak flooring. Low VOC paints were used throughout the home as well as LED bulbs. Energy Star appliances were also implemented. Lastly, Low-E windows [with] argon were used for the whole house.” Related: Crusty old Swiss barn transformed into a modern solar-powered home The renovated home, completed for $250,000 in 2016, offers bedrooms for the family’s two kids as well as a guest bedroom for when grandparents and friends visit. The large lot was preserved to provide an outdoor play area for the family’s children and dog. All second-floor rooms feature vaulted ceilings to help create the illusion of more space. + DII Architecture Images by Black Olive Photographic

View original post here: 
A 1940s home gets an energy-efficient renovation for $250K

LED lighting company aims to bring a little ‘friluftsliv’ into our hectic lives

May 31, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on LED lighting company aims to bring a little ‘friluftsliv’ into our hectic lives

No matter what stresses you deal with on a daily basis, the practice of reconnecting with nature is always beneficial. Scandinavians call this connection ‘friluftsliv’ (pronounced free-loofts-liv). Literally translated to “open-air living,” the term refers to the value of spending time in remote natural locations in order to rejuvenate ourselves, mentally and physically. Of course the problem is that our daily schedules are not always conducive to taking a nature-based break. As a solution, a forward-thinking lighting company, Festive Lights , has unveiled a line of LED-based lights geared toward bringing  friluftsliv into your home. With little effort, you can incorporate Festive Lights’ products into your day-to-day atmosphere, so even when you can’t get outside and connect with nature on a deeper level, you can still convert a little outdoor deck or garden into a peaceful oasis. Related:These dazzling zodiac lamps let you bring the heavens indoors The lights are specifically made to provide discreet lighting around greenery and create a warm, pleasant environment. The line includes various lights that use LED bulbs or solar energy. The Solar Bluebell Flower is a beautiful lantern with an integrated solar panel that brings a touch of romance to any garden, without wasting energy. String Dragonfly Fairy Lights, which have various settings, can light up any indoor or outdoor space. Even if you have little to no outdoor space, there are plenty of ways to bring nature indoors. Festive Lights offers a series of Rose Gold Metal Lantern Fairy Lights that use LED bulbs to emit a soothing light. The Nordic Rectangle Frame made from twig and filled with warm white LEDs is a unique accessory that welcomes nature into any room. With just unique lighting and a few plants here and there, you can easily begin to embrace  friluftsliv , even in your hectic everyday life. + Festive Lights Images via Festive Lights

View original here: 
LED lighting company aims to bring a little ‘friluftsliv’ into our hectic lives

Glowing glass lantern turns this energy-efficient office into a beacon

March 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Glowing glass lantern turns this energy-efficient office into a beacon

Abscis Architecten completed Notary Office, a new office building that exudes simplicity and tranquility with a environmentally conscious footprint. Located along Ghent’s Kortrijksesteenweg in Sint-Denijs-Westrem, the well-insulated brick building harnesses renewable energy and makes careful use of resources, including rainwater that’s partly absorbed by green roofs and partly recovered for toilets and irrigation. While these sustainable features are modestly tucked away from view, there is one feature that catches the eye: a large glazed wall at the top of the building that glows like a glass “lantern” and beacon at night. Minimalism, transparency, and a minimal environmental impact were key drivers in the design of Notary Office. In contrast to the dark facade, the interiors are dominated by white and awash in natural light that streams in through full-height glazing. The ground floor is centered on a glass-enclosed atrium that’s exposed to the outdoors and landscaped with ground cover and stepping-stones. The connection to the outdoors is further emphasized in the rear of the building where sliding glass doors open up to a landscaped garden with old trees that were carefully preserved during the construction process. Related: Green-roofed office is the first large-scale CLT structure in southeast Europe Natural light is also let in at the top of the stairs through a large glass window dubbed the glass “lantern” that the architects say “forms a minimalist light beacon along the busy road.” To mitigate unwanted solar gain, the architects installed electronically controlled aluminum solar shades . An air-water heat pump heats and cools the building. Warm LEDs and sustainable insulation is used throughout the office. + Abscis Architecten Via ArchDaily Images © Jeroen Verrecht

Read the original post:
Glowing glass lantern turns this energy-efficient office into a beacon

How this New York mall stays merry and bright, while saving energy

December 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How this New York mall stays merry and bright, while saving energy

Ridge Hill’s extensive LED lighting and controls update has actually allowed it to add more holiday displays.

More:
How this New York mall stays merry and bright, while saving energy

Vertical farming climbs in Cleveland, Chicago, New York

November 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Vertical farming climbs in Cleveland, Chicago, New York

LED-powered vertical farms will generate $6 billion by 2023 — and change the way Americans eat for the first time since WWII.

Here is the original post:
Vertical farming climbs in Cleveland, Chicago, New York

These Christmas lights are made of trash left on Canary Island beaches

October 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on These Christmas lights are made of trash left on Canary Island beaches

While some associate Christmas with crass consumerism, Spanish architect Fernando Menis from the Canary Islands believes it’s a great opportunity to reuse discarded objects. To prove the idea, Menis designed Christmas lights out of recycled summer waste for the coastal town of La Oliva on the island of Fuerteventura. Colorful floats, surfboards, buckets, beach toys and even plastic bottles abandoned on local beaches will have a second life as very unusual Christmas decorations on the exotic island. Instead of classic “White Christmas” snowflakes and snowmen, the architect proposed more appropriate marine decor that fits into the local context. La Oliva is traditionally linked to the sea and fishing, so Menis dreamt up giant squids, hibiscus flowers, palm trees, boats and jellyfish garlands – all lit with energy-efficient and environmentally friendly LED technology. Some of the lights are even powered by small solar panels. Menis also wants to bring his oceanic Christmas theme to the sea by supplying fishing boats navigating near the coast with recycled garlands that light up at night. Related: How to Green Your Holidays With Eco-Friendly Christmas Decor The project will be realized with the citizen participation – In fact, its assembly will involve the inhabitants and especially the local kids. What a great way to have fun and celebrate Christmas while creating real value with objects that tourists discard upon leaving the island. + Fernando Menis Images courtesy of Fernando Menis Architects

More here: 
These Christmas lights are made of trash left on Canary Island beaches

Magical Frost Light burns on the power of melting ice

September 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Magical Frost Light burns on the power of melting ice

Watching ice melt has never been cooler. Dutch architecture firm Edhv Studio transforms melting ice into electricity in Frost Light, a beautiful and brilliant lamp that harnesses the power of natural energy. The renewable light source taps into the magic of thermodynamics and shows how energy can be harvested from unexpected places. Frost Light is made up of four main components: an LED with hidden wires inside a metal plate, a block of ice, a base of solid aluminum, and a long metal funnel that extends to an upturned ice block mold. When the ice block is set on the metal plate, the melting process and resulting temperature difference generates enough electricity to power an LED for approximately three hours. The water drips down the funnel into a bucket that serves as a mold for new ice blocks. Related: Incredible ICEHOTEL shows off stunning fantasy-like rooms carved from ice and snow Frost Light was created as part of design collective Dutch Invertuals’ Power Play, an exhibition that addresses how natural energy can be transformed into valuable products or objects. The eye-catching melting ice lamp also made a recent appearance as part of Dutch Invertuals’ Harvest exhibition for futuristic designs at the London Design Fair earlier this month. + Edhv Studio

View original here: 
Magical Frost Light burns on the power of melting ice

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 7320 access attempts in the last 7 days.