Clean your plants and reap the reward of clean air

November 4, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Clean your plants and reap the reward of clean air

Although cleaning house plants probably ranks somewhere between wiping down the blades on the ceiling fan and cleaning out the gutters on your to-do list, it’s a chore that’s critical to the plant and, one could argue, to humanity. Let’s go back to science class for a minute in order to understand why a clean plant is a productive plant. Remember that little thing called photosynthesis? Leaves are a central organ in the process. Technically, the stomata, which are small openings all over the surface of the leaves, absorbs carbon dioxide. At the same time, the chlorophyll in the leaves absorb sunlight. The process of photosynthesis then converts the water and CO2 into sugar plants need to grow and oxygen we need to breathe. That’s a long way of saying that dusty, dirty, grimy leaves on your house plants can result in dusty, dirty, grimy air in your home. So bump that chore up your list a bit. Here are a few ideas of how to accomplish the task with spending endless hours wiping down every individual leaf.  Take a shower Your morning shower is likely a rejuvenating ritual and your plants share your affinity. After all, it’s natural for plants to storm the rain, absorb the water and experience a cleansing. Take that concept inside by moving your plants to the shower. You can join them or place plants into the bathtub and use a detachable shower head to do the job. Give each plant a thorough soaking with cool to lukewarm water, allowing the water to both wash the leaves and provide moisture to the soil. Do not use hot or cold water that can be too shocking for the plant. Once saturated, give each plant a gentle shake to remove standing water on the leaves. Allow plants to drain into the empty tub and wipe off any excess water from the pot before placing it back on furniture. If you do not have drain holes in your planter, strain off excess water from the soil to avoid root rot. Related: This self-sustaining planter doesn’t require sunlight for plants to thrive Grab a feather duster Like every other surface in your home, the leaves on your plants will collect dust. It’s best to provide regular dustings rather than trying to deal with a thick layer of dust down the road. When feather dusting, lightly move over the surfaces of the plant , weaving between branches to touch the top and bottom of leaves. Use caution so you don’t disrupt blooms or knock healthy leaves off the plant.  Take them outside Another mess-free way to clean your plants is to take the task outside. Put your plants in a shady spot in the lawn, on your deck or patio. Use a shower setting on your garden hose to wash the plants, give them a gentle shake, and allow them to dry before bringing them back indoors. Often the water pressure from any of these showering techniques causes some of the soil to slop out. By completing the chore outdoors, clean up is a breeze. Just bring your plants indoors and hose the area down.  Use the sink The kitchen sink may or may not be an easier option than the shower, but the concept is the same. Use your faucet nozzle set to spray for a shower effect on each plant. You will likely have to wash plants in a rotation if you have more than two or three. Allow plants to drain and dry off pots before removing them from the sink and then start on a new batch until they are all cleaned.  Use a mister Not all plants can easily be moved to the bathroom or outdoors due to size and other factors. The deep soak isn’t necessary on a regular basis either, so in between showers, give your plants a spit bath with a mister. Any spray bottle set to a mist can provide the moisture, humidity and cleaning your plants need. Keep a spray bottle filled for this purpose. Some plants won’t respond well to showers, like those with spiky or furry leaves. For these plants, use a mixture of dish soap and water on a regular basis to keep the leaves dust free. Cleaning is more than removing dust Once you’ve set aside the time to give your plants the TLC they deserve, make sure to check in on their general health and not just their personal hygiene. Remove any dead leaves from the plant and the soil below it. Dead leaves can contain bacteria and contaminate otherwise healthy soil. Also check the leaves of your houseplants for bugs and insects. Similarly, watch for bugs being flushed away while you wash your plants. If you see insects on your houseplants it might be time to treat them. Sometimes you can only see evidence of very small pests or disease so look for symptoms like black spots, webbing and sticky or curling leaves. Healthy plants provide healthy air, so make the commitment to care for your plants with regular dusting and a cleansing shower every now and then. Breathe in the victory of your efforts.  Via Apartment Therapy Images via Adobe Stock

Excerpt from: 
Clean your plants and reap the reward of clean air

What To Do With Autumn Leaves

September 21, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on What To Do With Autumn Leaves

Ah, fall. Back to school, sweater weather, and warm drinks. … The post What To Do With Autumn Leaves appeared first on Earth911.com.

The rest is here:
What To Do With Autumn Leaves

Groundbreaking new material for longer-lasting batteries inspired by leaf veins

April 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Groundbreaking new material for longer-lasting batteries inspired by leaf veins

Biology may hold the clues to better batteries . An international team of scientists designed a porous material inspired by the vascular structure of leaves that could make energy transfers more efficient. Similar to the way leaf veins efficiently transport nutrients, this material could help rechargeable batteries perform better and last longer. A team of researchers led by Xianfeng Zheng of China’s Wuhan University of Technology and Australia’s University of Queensland scrutinized the way leaf veins optimize the flow of nutrients, with minimum energy consumption, “by branching out to smaller scales” according to the University of Cambridge , and then applied that to their groundbreaking porous material. The nature-inspired material could help relieve stresses in battery electrodes that currently limit their lifespan. The material could also enhance the charge and discharge process. Related: American fern inspires groundbreaking new solar storage solution The team calls their product Murray material after Murray’s Law. Cambridge said according to the rule the whole network of pores in biological systems is connected in a manner “to facilitate the transfer of liquids and minimize resistance throughout the network.” Scientist Bao-Lian Su of Cambridge, Wuhan University of Technology, and University of Namur in Belgium said they applied that biological law to chemistry , saying, “The introduction of the concept of Murray’s Law to industrial processes could revolutionize the design of reactors with highly enhanced efficiency, minimum energy, time, and raw material consumption for a sustainable future.” The scientists applied Murray material to gas sensing and photocatalysis as well. Su is a co-author on a paper published online by Nature Communications late last week. There are seven other co-authors on the paper from institutions in China, Australia, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Another co-author, Tawfique Hasan of Cambridge University, said it could be possible to manufacture the porous material on a large scale. Via the University of Cambridge Images via Christoph Rupprecht on Flickr and Pixabay

Original post: 
Groundbreaking new material for longer-lasting batteries inspired by leaf veins

Pope opens free laundromat for Rome’s poor

April 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Pope opens free laundromat for Rome’s poor

Homeless people in Rome will now have a place to wash their clothes and blankets, thanks to Pope Francis . The pope recently opened a free laundromat, the Lavanderia di Papa Francesco, or Pope Francis Laundry, with the goal of restoring “dignity to many people who are our brothers and sisters.” The Pope Francis Laundry, in a former hospital near the Vatican in Rome’s city center, is stocked with six donated washing machines and dryers from the Whirlpool Corporation . Poor and homeless people have access to detergent, fabric softener, and irons provided there as well. The Community of Sant’Egidio , a Christian organization fighting poverty , will operate the free laundromat. Showers, medical facilities, and a barbershop are also planned for the site. Related: Pope Francis urges Americans to fight climate change in his first address to the country According to the Vatican, the free laundromat is for “the poorest people, particularly the homeless, who will be able to wash, dry, and iron their clothes and blankets.” This isn’t the first time Pope Francis has stepped out to help the poor. Outcasts or those on the edges of society have been a large focus of his papacy so far. He opened a shower and barber facility near St. Peter’s Basilica two years ago. That same year to mark his 78th birthday he passed out hundreds of sleeping bags to Rome’s homeless. Last September at the canonization celebration for Mother Teresa, he invited 1,500 homeless people to travel to Rome and occupy seats of honor, and eat a free pizza lunch. He’s also housed refugee families in the Vatican. Last week three Syrian families moved in, replacing some families who have recently moved out to live on their own. Last year on Maundy Thursday, following Christian tradition, Pope Francis washed people’s feet, and the people whose feet he chose to wash were those of refugees and Muslims. This year for Maundy Thursday this week he will wash the feet of inmates at a prison south of Rome. Via The Guardian Images via Office Of Papal Charities/EPA , Community of Sant’Egidio Facebook , and Wikimedia Commons

More here: 
Pope opens free laundromat for Rome’s poor

Edag’s Light Cocoon is a 3D-printed car inspired by leaves

December 18, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Edag’s Light Cocoon is a 3D-printed car inspired by leaves

Last spring, EDAG unveiled a 3D-printed car that was inspired by a turtle – and the German engineering firm just unveiled its latest car inspired by nature. The EDAG Light Cocoon has a skeletal, organic structure that’s covered in a fabric membrane featuring a pattern inspired by fall leaves. Read the rest of Edag’s Light Cocoon is a 3D-printed car inspired by leaves Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed car , 3d printer , EDAG , EDAG Engineering , EDAG Genesis concept , EDAG Light Cocoon , green car , green transportation , jack wolfskin , leaf , leaves , Light Cocoon

See more here:
Edag’s Light Cocoon is a 3D-printed car inspired by leaves

Toxic 1.3 Billion Gallon Tailing Spill Leaves 300 Canadians Without Water

August 8, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Toxic 1.3 Billion Gallon Tailing Spill Leaves 300 Canadians Without Water

About 300 people in rural British Columbia, Canada are without drinking water right now after the tailings pond at a nearby mine breached , spilling more than a billion gallons of toxic waste into the environment. When the tailings pond at the open-pit Mount Polley copper and gold mine near Quesnel, B.C. breached earlier this week, it sent the equivalent of 1.3 billion gallons (the equivalent of 2,000 Olympic pools) of slurry containing mining byproducts and chemicals including arsenic, mercury and sulphur down through the mountains and into local water systems – forcing a water ban for 300 people living nearby. That number could rise as further-reaching implications of the spill are uncovered. Read the rest of Toxic 1.3 Billion Gallon Tailing Spill Leaves 300 Canadians Without Water Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: breach , canada , canadians , chemicals , imperial , metals , mine , mining , mount , polley , Pollution , Pond , quesnel , tailings , toxic

See the original post here:
Toxic 1.3 Billion Gallon Tailing Spill Leaves 300 Canadians Without Water

Álvaro Siza Completes Floating Green-Roofed Chemical Plant on an Artificial Lake in China

August 8, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Álvaro Siza Completes Floating Green-Roofed Chemical Plant on an Artificial Lake in China

Read the rest of Álvaro Siza Completes Floating Green-Roofed Chemical Plant on an Artificial Lake in China Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alvaro siza , architecture China , Álvaro Siza China , buildings on the water , industrial buildings , island architecture , Portuguese architects , Shihlien Chemical Industrial Jiangsu Co

Read the rest here: 
Álvaro Siza Completes Floating Green-Roofed Chemical Plant on an Artificial Lake in China

The Unsung Heroes of Urban Design: How Bike Bollards Protect Pedestrians & Property While Providing Bike Parking

August 8, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Unsung Heroes of Urban Design: How Bike Bollards Protect Pedestrians & Property While Providing Bike Parking

Sometimes the most well-designed and useful objects are the ones you hardly notice at all. Case in point:  bike bollards . You’ve probably encountered a bollard at one time or another (they look like heavy, squat posts), but bike bollards are an elevated version of these common structures that perform double duty by protecting buildings and pedestrians from cars while also providing a place for secure bicycle parking. Read on to learn more about these unsung heroes of urban design, and how they better streetscapes in their own quiet but effective way. Read the rest of The Unsung Heroes of Urban Design: How Bike Bollards Protect Pedestrians & Property While Providing Bike Parking Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bike bollard , bike bollards , bike parking , bollards , eco design , green design , Reliance Foundry , sustainable design , Urban design , what is a bike bollard , what is a bollard

Here is the original post: 
The Unsung Heroes of Urban Design: How Bike Bollards Protect Pedestrians & Property While Providing Bike Parking

Organic Japanese Shell Residence Wraps Around a Centenarian Fir Tree

August 8, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Organic Japanese Shell Residence Wraps Around a Centenarian Fir Tree

Read the rest of Organic Japanese Shell Residence Wraps Around a Centenarian Fir Tree Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , Architecture , fir tree , green interiors , green lighting , green materials , green resources , Japan , japanese forest , locally sourced wood , long-lasting concrete

The rest is here:
Organic Japanese Shell Residence Wraps Around a Centenarian Fir Tree

Self-Healing Solar Cells Mimic Plant Leaves to Repair Themselves

August 15, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Self-Healing Solar Cells Mimic Plant Leaves to Repair Themselves

Photo via Shutterstock Plant leaves are the ideal model for a lot of solar technology, so it only makes sense that developers of manmade solar panels would look to Mother Nature to improve the efficiency of their designs. Over time, solar cells wear down — just like leaves — due to degradation caused by ultraviolet light. A team of researchers from North Carolina State University revealed this week that they have created a new type of solar cell that can repair and reinvigorate itself by mimicking the functioning of organic vascular systems found in nature. Read the rest of Self-Healing Solar Cells Mimic Plant Leaves to Repair Themselves Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , biomimicry , clean tech , green tech , green technology , leaves , natural solar cells , North Carolina State , organic solar cells , Solar Cell , solar panels , Solar Power , solar technology        

Original post:
Self-Healing Solar Cells Mimic Plant Leaves to Repair Themselves

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1599 access attempts in the last 7 days.