These tiny and adorable vintage campers are made for birds

April 20, 2018 by  
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Vintage camper vans all the rage nowadays—and now you can even help your backyard birds get in on the action too. Marcus Williams and Sj Stone of the Nashville-based design studio One Man, One Garage crafted the Vintage Camper Birdhouse that’s easy to put together and stunning to look at. Laser cut from birch wood, the Vintage Camper Birdhouse is made to order and ships flatpack . Construction is a breeze with no glue required; the birdhouse’s 40-plus parts are pre-cut and pop up out from five punch cards. The kits can be customized with paint and can also be pre-stained in a variety of vintage hues. Related: Enchanting birdhouses inspired by famous architecture The camper van was inspired by photographs of a 1974 Scotty travel trailer once owned by the designers and is built to a roughly 1:20 scale that measures nine inches in length, six inches wide, and nearly five inches tall. Though tiny, the travel trailer birdhouse comes with a lot of detail: awnings on three sides, flowers for the two window boxes, curtains, a spare tire, leveling jack, a welcome mat, two flamingoes and a classic Weber style grill. The adorable birdhouses are available on Etsy starting at $25. + One Man, One Garage Via Colossal Images via One Man, One Garage

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These tiny and adorable vintage campers are made for birds

This ultra-thin aluminum pavilion evokes a supernatural pine tree

March 12, 2018 by  
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Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY’s works are both otherworldly and instantly recognizable—and Pine Sanctuary at the entrance to the Riverwood Conservancy in Mississauga is no exception. Like the NYC-based art and architecture firm’s other projects, this vaulted structure combines organic forms with striking coloration in an ultra-thin aluminum composition. The large-scale sculpture was brought to life with computation design and digital fabrication and was funded in part by the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program in celebration of Canada’s 150th anniversary. From a distance, Pine Sanctuary’s conical and green appearance evokes the image of an unusual tree. Up close, however, the self-supporting pavilion reveals itself as a porous shelter providing shade and an unforgettable photo backdrop. The curvilinear installation was built from laser-cut pieces of ultra-thin aluminum that were painted in four shades of green, blue, black, and white. The linear aluminum stripes and arching components were installed from the ground up. Related: This incredible building is made from material as thin as a coin “A system of branches rotates around a center point,” wrote the architects. “There’s no trunk holding up this arboreal structure. Instead, it opens up into a shady space. “Branches” touch the ground lightly around a covered grove, like a redwood hollowed out. Its feet, splay in all directions, along the way creating a labyrinth through which one can slip in, out and around. Circling the structure, no facade ever repeats itself. The new, unique angle upon every step forward prolongs the sense of discovery.” Pine Sanctuary is the studio’s second public pavilion in Canada. + Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY Images via Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY

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This ultra-thin aluminum pavilion evokes a supernatural pine tree

Rainwater-harvesting pavilions mimic a lush rainforest at the Indianapolis Zoo

October 23, 2017 by  
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Artful rainwater design has taken root at the Indianapolis Zoo. RATIO Architects recently completed the Bicentennial Pavilion, an open-air events space modeled after a lush rainforest with 11 steel-framed “tree canopies.” Built primarily from natural materials, the pavilion is a beautiful example of multifunctional and sustainable design that provides 40,000 square feet of weather-protected events space while collecting and filtering 100% of its stormwater runoff. The Indianapolis Zoo Bicentennial Pavilion and Promenade was made possible by a $10 million grant provided by the Lilly Endowment in 2015. The money came with the requirement that the zoo “implement a game-changing initiative that benefits the community institution’s long-term sustainability.” To satisfy the zoo’s needs to expand visitor infrastructure and the Lilly Endowment’s condition, RATIO Architects designed an open-air multifunctional facility that could be used year-round and replace the zoo’s former 400-person events tent tucked into the back-of-house areas. The sustainability angle came from the use of natural materials —each tree-like column is built of 63 individual timber beams, while a hearth of rough-back quarry block limestone rests beneath the canopy—and stormwater management . The pavilion canopy funnels rainwater down the tree-like column’s laser-cut weathered steel rain screens and into planting beds, where it then percolates through a water quality unit and is held in a 14-foot deep water detention bed designed to accommodate 100-year flood events. The angled pavilion canopy is built of translucent roofing materials to let filtered light shine through, just as in a real rainforest canopy. Related: Stunning solar Butterfly House masters resource conservation in California The Bicentennial Pavilion is split up into two main event areas, each of which accommodate up to 400 guests. The pavilion can also be converted into one large event space for up to 800 guests. The pavilion’s north side is designed for the new bird exhibition, Magnificent Macaws, with a custom-designed stage and perch to showcase the birds on their twice-daily flight through the Pavilion. + RATIO Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Susan Fleck

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Rainwater-harvesting pavilions mimic a lush rainforest at the Indianapolis Zoo

Interactive Kaleidome activates a public park in Hong Kong

May 6, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Interactive Kaleidome activates a public park in Hong Kong Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: art in Hong Kong , art installation , digital fabrication , Hong Kong , Kaleidome , LAAB , Laboratory for art and architecture , laser cut , makers movement , polyhedral cells , Voronoi tessellation

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Interactive Kaleidome activates a public park in Hong Kong

Morrissey to Live Earth: go vegan because ‘meat consumption is killing the planet’

May 6, 2015 by  
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What do you do when you’re unhappy with decisions a politician is making? You write a letter, of course. Morrissey penned a sharp-tongued missive to former vice president Al Gore and producer Kevin Wall who, together, are the founders of the climate change awareness event Live Earth , scheduled for June 18. The former Smiths frontman  calls on the organizers to serve an all-vegan menu at the event, in which 100 artists will perform across seven continents. The “Meat is Murder” singer has a long history of demanding venues go vegan for his appearances, but he has a special message for the Live Earth crew: Ditch meat because it’s bad for the planet. Read the rest of Morrissey to Live Earth: go vegan because ‘meat consumption is killing the planet’ Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Al Gore , Climate Change , climate change awareness , going vegan , kevin wall , live earth , meat is murder , morrissey , morrissey all-vegan , morrissey urges going vegan , morrissey writes letter to al gore , morrissey’s letter to al gore , morrissey’s letter to live earth , moz , vegan , vegan concerts

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Morrissey to Live Earth: go vegan because ‘meat consumption is killing the planet’

This flat-pack, laser-cut furniture assembles without glue or bolts

December 12, 2014 by  
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Freedom furniture is revolutionizing the way we make furniture. The company starts with computerized modeling to create shapes that work seamlessly with the human body. The flat-pack furniture  is made by laser cutting sheets of plywood which are then assembled like a 3D puzzle that fits so precisely there is no need to glue or bolt the joints. The result is a piece of furniture that is extraordinarily comfortable and gorgeous to look at. + Freeform Furniture The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to  see  your  story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following  this link . Remember to follow our  instructions  carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!   Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green furniture” , 3D puzzle furniture , bolt-less furniture , flat pack furniture , Freeform , Freeform Buildings , Freeform furniture , glue-less furniture , laser cut furniture , plywood furniture , reader submission

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This flat-pack, laser-cut furniture assembles without glue or bolts

Tokyo’s Fab Café Serves Up Coffee and Laser-Cut Designs While You Wait

January 25, 2013 by  
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There is a wonderful little place in Tokyo’s bustling Shibuya where you can have a cup of coffee and laser-cut your own design. Called Fab Café — which stands for both fabulous and fabrication — the fine dining and designing destination was created by Naruse-Inokuma Architects in a minimal yet cozy Japanese style. Digital media production company  Loftwork  also operates inside so if there’s a problem with the machinery, or if you’re craving a muffin with your latte, they will surely be able to help. Read the rest of Tokyo’s Fab Café Serves Up Coffee and Laser-Cut Designs While You Wait Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , cafe , coffee , DIY , fab cafe , laser cut , Loftwork , Naruse-Inokuma Architects , Shibuya , tokyo cafe , Tokyo design , tokyo tourist

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Tokyo’s Fab Café Serves Up Coffee and Laser-Cut Designs While You Wait

Eric Standley’s Mind-Blowing Paper Sculptures Look Like Gothic Cathedral Windows

January 23, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Eric Standley’s Mind-Blowing Paper Sculptures Look Like Gothic Cathedral Windows Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , Biodegradable , Eric Standley , green materials , laser cut , paper cut , paper sculptures , recycling / compost

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Eric Standley’s Mind-Blowing Paper Sculptures Look Like Gothic Cathedral Windows

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