A striking timber home with a green roof disappears into a Mexican forest

August 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Barcelona- and Mexico City-based firm  Cadaval Sola-Morales has just unveiled Casa de la Roca, a beautiful, dark timber home topped with a green roof  and located in a remote forest in Mexico. The single-story structure features a jet-black facade crafted from felled trees and finished with a living roof to help camouflage the home into the peaceful, secluded forestscape. When designing Casa de la Roca, the architects were focused on one objective: to create a home that would easily blend into the landscape for years to come. Acting accordingly, the architects chose materials based on durability. The structure, which sits on a low-maintenance concrete foundation, is clad in reclaimed timber from local felled or dead trees. Related: Living trees grow through the ceiling of Cadaval & Sola-Morales’ Tepoztlan Lounge in Mexico The exterior walls were then coated in black paint to add longevity to the structure. “We used paint (and not dye), to add another layer of material protection; dye tends to lose its qualities over the years,” the architects explained. “It is black, responding to the desire to blend in with the landscape, seeking a certain anonymity in front of the vegetation and exuberant views.” The dark exterior essentially allows the home to hide deep within the forest , but that wasn’t enough for the architects. Once the dwelling was constructed, the team finished the entire roof with vegetation, creating an even stronger connection between the man-made and natural. According to the architects, the home’s layout of three long hallways that converge into the main living space was also inspired by the landscape. The team wanted the house to have three private lookouts at each end to provide distinct views of the forest. The three “arms” of the home come together at a central point, which is also where people can come together and socialize . The interior space is both elegant and welcoming. A minimal amount of furniture is spread out over the open-plan living room, so the main focus is always on the incredible nature that surrounds the home. Extra large floor-to-ceiling windows and doors allow optimal natural light into the home, while also creating a seamless connection to the forest. + Cadaval Sola-Morales Via Wallpaper Photography by Sandra Pereznieto

Go here to read the rest: 
A striking timber home with a green roof disappears into a Mexican forest

Striking yellow PVC-clad pavilion is a sustainable shelter designed for the end times

August 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Studio Morison has unveiled a stunning round shelter clad in a membrane of yellow PVC and aluminum mesh – and it just might help see you through the apocalypse. The artists behind the Escape Vehicle #9 shelter, Heather and Ivan Morison, explain that its design was inspired by their vision of a future world where nature has reclaimed the planet. The glowing pavilion has been installed in Holtingerveld, one of the darkest places in the Netherlands, as part of the Into Nature: Out of Darkness art festival, and it invites guest to spend the night in its metallic “existence chamber.” The sustainable shelter is a lightweight, compact structure made up of minimal materials, making it fully demountable. The circular wall consists of a membrane of yellow PVC, which is clad in a custom aluminum expanded mesh. Four Spirafix screw anchors connect the structure’s aluminum legs to the ground, ensuring that the building leaves little to no impact on the landscape. Related: Nomad Pavilion is a woven goat hair desert shelter that collects its own water As far as the design inspiration, Ivan says that he envisioned a future when nature reclaims the planet, when humans will have to “tread quickly and lightly on the land they occupy.” He further explains, “When first imagining Escape Vehicle #9 I had a vision of a flight into the future. I saw a lightness from that future within the darkness of the present, and this is where the Escape Vehicle can take us towards.” His vision of light and darkness can be seen firsthand in the shelter’s interior. Visitors enter the  shelter  through a ladder on the ground, which leads into a circular “existence chamber” with metallic flooring and a ceiling clad in a quilted foil insulation to help maintain the temperature. The chamber is compact, but spacious enough for two people. A double bed sits at the center, directly under a conical “navigational buoy” made from bent sheets of aluminum. A hatch in the metallic ceiling provides access to the rooftop deck , where visitors can enjoy beautiful, peaceful views of the surrounding nature. The yellow structure stands out in the vast greenery during the day, but it converts into a glowing beacon at night. Inside the shelter , the intensity of the yellow increases as the sun rises, creating a glowing light meant to have a calming effect on the inhabitants. The Into Nature: Out of Darkness event runs until September 16th. The shelter is part of the biennial event’s art route, which is also featuring works by Olafur Eliasson , Adrián Villar Rojas and Susan Philipsz this year. Guests can make reservations to sleep in the Escape Vehicle #9 for a unique, off-grid experience. + Studio Morrison Via Dezeen Photography via Studio Morison

Here is the original: 
Striking yellow PVC-clad pavilion is a sustainable shelter designed for the end times

This riverfront pier is revitalized after Cyclone Maria ravaged Rockhampton

August 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

When Cyclone Maria hit Rockhampton,  Queensland in 2015, the whole community quickly joined forces to repair and rebuild local homes and businesses. Now, one of the most prized assets of the community, the Rockhampton Riverside Precinct, is getting a major makeover — led by Woods Bagot — that everyone can enjoy. The massive riverfront pier site suffered from neglect even before the cyclone hit, but its potential was steadfast. Architectural firm Woods Bagot is at the forefront of the renovation of the pier and adjacent structures and is intent to restore the two-story landmark back to the community hub it once was. Not only will the pier be overhauled and upgraded, the site will be designed to offer something for everyone, from kids to adults. The plans include interactive water attractions, galleries of local artwork, lush terraced landscaping, a playground and plenty of open space for mulling around or just taking in the picturesque surroundings. Local businesses, including a new restaurant celebrating the region’s fresh produce and seafood, will round out the attractions at the Rockhampton Riverside Precinct. Related: Australia’s cyclone-resistant home The rich auburn exterior of Corten steel will include embellishments of silver, gold and copper, homage to the region’s history of ore mining. Green aspects of the project include solar roof tiles that produce electricity for the project’s power grid, plenty of charging stations for electric cars  and sites for bicycle maintenance and minor repairs to encourage green transportation . Instead of energy-hungry cooling systems, the complex largely depends on keeping the atmosphere comfortable with huge roof overhangs and fresh breezes off the water wafting through the open hallways and deck. Images of ancient ship masts come to mind as the winds whip through the structure, impatiently changing direction as nature dictates. “Rockhampton Riverside Precinct has become a destination for everyone to visit, occupy and enjoy,” said Mark Damant, principal of Woods Bagot. “The vision of restoring the energy from the gold period has been realized along with the aim to provide the people of Rockhampton with a world-class civic and recreational space.” + Woods Bagot Images via Florian Groehn

Read more: 
This riverfront pier is revitalized after Cyclone Maria ravaged Rockhampton

Prefab holiday cabins boast spectacular coastal views in Tasmania

August 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

If you’ve ever dreamed of visiting Tasmania , you’ll want to put Freycinet’s newest additions on your bucket list. Nestled inside one of the country’s oldest national parks, this unique hotel recently saw the completion of its nine Coastal Pavilions, a series of prefabricated one-bedroom cabins designed by Liminal Studio that blur the lines between inside and out. Inspired by the spectacular surroundings, the pavilions are fitted out with a natural material palette, full-height glazing and rounded, sinuous surfaces that evoke an organic feel. Located on a wind-blown pink granite outcropping on the Freycinet Peninsula in Freycinet National Park, the new Coastal Pavilions at Freycinet Lodge were prefabricated offsite for minimal site impact. Each pavilion was carefully placed to provide privacy and an immersive experience while maximizing views. As a result, not all of the pavilions have water views as some are nestled into the coastal bushland; the pavilions comprise two types, Coastal Pavilions and Coastal Pavilions – Bay View. All of the contemporary pavilions are wrapped in charred ironbark that helps recede the buildings into the landscape, as well as full-height double-glazing. Netted, hammock-like balustrades surround the timber deck complete with an outdoor soaking tub. Inside, local Tasmanian timbers are used throughout to create the highly textured walls, ceilings and floors, which flow together with sinuous lines devoid of hard corners. In addition to a large bedroom, the pavilion is equipped with a living area and walk-in shower. Related: Stellar views and a small footprint define this Tasmanian timber cabin “We have drawn inspiration from this unique setting to influence the architecture and interiors of the pavilions,” said Peta Heffernan, Design Director at Liminal Studio. “The design has taken its cue from the fluidity and layers of the coastal rock formations, the coloring of the rich orange lichen and forms of the nearby bays. The exteriors are treated in a recessive way so as not to compete with this beautiful landscape.” + Liminal Studio Images by Dianna Snape

Read the original post: 
Prefab holiday cabins boast spectacular coastal views in Tasmania

A net-zero modern farmhouse kicks off a sustainable community in Texas

July 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A net-zero modern farmhouse kicks off a sustainable community in Texas

When a pair of retired ordained ministers set their sights on creating a sustainable community for “spiritual renewal,” the couple turned to Austin-based design practice Miró Rivera Architects to bring their vision to life. Located on a 47-acre meadow property in Texas , the recently completed Hill Country House serves as the community’s first housing prototype and as a private residence for the clients. Affectionately dubbed “The Sanctuary” by its owners, the spacious farmhouse-style abode combines rural influences with a modern aesthetic on a very modest budget. Arranged in a linear layout spanning 5,100 square feet, The Hill Country House cuts a striking and sculptural silhouette in the landscape with its zigzagging standing-seam metal roof that mimics the surrounding hilly topography. The home is primarily clad in white corrugated aluminum siding interrupted by vertical planks of warm cedar siding. The tapering limestone chimney, inspired by an existing shed on site, was built of dry-stacked local stone. Natural and locally sourced materials were used to reduce environmental impact and to tie the appearance to the landscape. Inside, the home is flooded with natural light and overlooks framed outdoor views. Crisp white walls and tall ceilings lend the home its bright and airy character. The public and private areas of the home are located on opposite ends. “Particular attention was paid to creating spaces that would enable hosting large groups of friends and family, blurring the line between indoor and outdoor space,” the architects explained. “The stark white aluminum cladding is broken at various intervals by warm cypress siding that defines a series of rooms outside the house, including a temple-like screen porch that extends from the volume containing the main living spaces.” Related: Spectacular wildflower roof grows atop a dreamy Texan cabana The environmentally friendly features of the Hill Country House have earned it a 4-star rating from the Austin Energy Green Building, a precursor of the LEED certification system. An 8 kW solar array meets nearly two-thirds of the home’s annual energy usage, while a five-ton geothermal system supplies mechanical heating and cooling. The homeowners’ water needs are supplied by a 30,000-gallon rainwater collection system. According to a project statement, the owners hope their modern farmhouse will serve “as a model for future off-the-grid development.” + Miró Rivera Architects Images by Paul Finkel / Piston Design

Here is the original:
A net-zero modern farmhouse kicks off a sustainable community in Texas

This round treehouse’s undulating roof mimics the flow of water

July 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This round treehouse’s undulating roof mimics the flow of water

Nothing screams “serenity now” like an off-grid treehouse retreat that lets you wake up to the sounds of rustling leaves and a burbling brook. Thankfully, the architects at MONOARCHI have created a gorgeous round treehouse  that goes above and beyond the traditional fare, tucked away in a bamboo forest in China. Treewow O is about 26 feet off the ground, and it comes complete with an open-air deck shaded by an undulating round roof. Located in a remote village at the foot of the Siming Mountain range in Yuyao, Zhejiang Province, Treewow O was inspired by the incredible surrounding landscape. The house is approximately 26 feet high, a measurement chosen to blend the structure into the surrounding bamboo fields. Related: Microsoft unveils amazing treehouse office where employees can brainstorm in fresh air Built just a few steps away from a creek, the treehouse is divided into two levels and supported by steel beams, a design feature that was chosen to minimize the project’s impact on the landscape . The design consists of three non-concentric circles clad in wooden panels. A beautiful undulating roof covers the main structure and extends in certain places to shade the wraparound terrace. According to the architects, the constant movement of a nearby stream inspried the roof’s unique, wavy shape. To create the treehouse, the architect worked in collaboration with local craftsmen. According to the project description, the undulating form mirrors a local building practice used to protect interior spaces from harsh weather conditions. In addition to its protective qualities, the gradient movement of the design helps provide natural air circulation to the living space. The interior of the round structure houses a bathroom and living space on the first floor, with a spiral staircase leading up to the large bedroom on the second floor. The bold circular design helps to define the private and public spaces in the structure. According to the design team, “When the guest enters the terrace on the first floor, they will start to experience the circular sequence of spaces from the eave along the terrace to the connected interior: from the living room to the huge window, to the terrace of large depth and to the unwrapping roof to enjoy the view to the creek and the landscape of the mountain of bamboos; from the bedroom to the low window, to the falling roof to capture a good view.” + MONOARCHI Via Archdaily Images via MONOARCHI

See the original post here:
This round treehouse’s undulating roof mimics the flow of water

Lush green roof camouflages the Chameleon Villa into the Indonesian tropics

July 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Lush green roof camouflages the Chameleon Villa into the Indonesian tropics

True to its name, the Chameleon Villa is a residence that seamlessly blends into its forested surroundings in Bali thanks to its integration of a lush green roof. Designed by international architecture practice Word of Mouth House , the contemporary home spans nearly 11,000 square feet, yet deftly hides its bulk with landscaped roofs. The “camouflaged” roofs also help promote natural cooling and are integrated with rainwater collection and recycling systems as well as solar panels. Located in the village of Buwit in southwest Bali, the Chameleon Villa is set on an acre of densely forested land with steep and challenging terrain, including a level change of 36 feet. To blend the building into the site as much as possible, the designers at Word of Mouth House crafted the home as a cluster of volumes that step down the slope and are carefully positioned to follow the original contour lines and to optimize views of the river below and forest beyond. A natural materials palette  — with locally sourced elements like teak wood, iron wood and natural stone — further blends the dwelling into the landscape. Related: Beautiful bamboo pavilion in Bali translates the flexibility of yoga into architecture “We worked on the idea of ‘landscaped architecture’ by blurring the boundaries between natural and built environments,” explained the firm. “As a result, the buildings appear to be a part of the land itself sometimes disappearing within it, and then at other times, emerging from it. As per traditional Balinese architecture the different pavilions accommodate different functions and all communal spaces are kept open towards the elements whereas the bedrooms and other more private spaces such as office, gym and media room are close-able volumes.” The vibrant green roofs keep the lower spaces comfortable through passive cooling, and this vegetation also aids in rainwater collection. The residents can recycle the water for use in garden irrigation. The home also produces clean energy through solar panels, further adding to its sustainable features. + Word of Mouth House Images by Daniel Koh

Originally posted here: 
Lush green roof camouflages the Chameleon Villa into the Indonesian tropics

Ancient rural hamlet reinterpreted as a solar-powered modern home

July 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Ancient rural hamlet reinterpreted as a solar-powered modern home

Rimini-based GGA Gardini Gibertini Architects  has renovated a cluster of historic buildings into a modernist dwelling set in the lush Italian countryside. Named the AP House, the project comprises three structures with a more streamlined farmhouse aesthetic on the exterior and a light-filled contemporary interior. The striking renovation is located on one of the highest hills in Urbino atop ancient remains that date back to the Medieval Communes. Clad in rustic stonework, AP House consists of three floors constructed with reinforced concrete walls and red concrete floors. To lend the interiors a sense of warmth, GGA Gardini Gibertini Architects inserted custom walnut wall furnishings throughout, from the kitchen storage and dining table to the walnut-lined office and double-height statement wall that rises from the living room. Large openings let in plenty of natural light and views of the picturesque Urbino countryside. “Linked to each other on the hypogeum level, the structures rest on a red concrete platform (38 X 20 mt) dominating the surrounding landscape,” wrote GGA Gardini Gibertini Architects. “The core of the houses, which forms a single housing unit, reestablishes a central role to this site in the landscape, restoring a direct and empathic dialogue between new buildings and historical stratification.” Related: Historic stone stable in Tuscany hides a beautiful contemporary interior To prevent views of any vehicles on the first floor, the architects tucked the main entrance and parking in the basement level. The lower level also comprises a movie room, an exhibition gallery, and a gym with a spa. The ground floor houses the primary living areas including the living room, dining room, kitchen and private studio, while the upper level contains the master suite along with two en-suite bedrooms. All of the systems in the house run on electricity and are powered by a hidden photovoltaic solar system onsite. + GGA Gardini Gibertini Architects Images by Ezio Manciucca

View post:
Ancient rural hamlet reinterpreted as a solar-powered modern home

The spacious Camberwell House reconnects a large family with nature

July 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The spacious Camberwell House reconnects a large family with nature

When a family approached AM Architecture wanting to turn their mid-century modern into a more spacious home with a stronger relationship to the outdoors, the firm had a tall order to fill. The large family wanted a bigger indoor living space to accommodate their numbers and an improved layout that would allow them to reconnect with nature. The result is the 5,920 square-foot Camberwell House in Melbourne . The firm redesigned the existing home and successfully created a comfortable space for the family that embraces indoor-outdoor living. To meet the family’s expectations, the architects created a split-level design for the living areas and re-centered the home’s entry to create a pavilion , which serves as a meeting place for the family and their guests. The pavilion structure has become a focal point of the house, incorporating key elements that serve as the centerpiece of any home: the kitchen, a dining space and living areas complete with a fireplace. To help foster a stronger connection to nature, the architects included large windows throughout the home. These windows, including the floor-to-ceiling glazing, utilize a low-E coating to help block heat in the summer and keep the house cozy and warm in the winter. Large internal brick walls also assist in regulating the indoor climate. Related: Mid-century Eichler home gets a bold remodel into the 21st century Furnishings are a futuristic take on mid-century style and blend well into the wood and glass materials that make up the family home. In the kitchen, cupboards provide plenty of storage space while also concealing appliances. An abundance of shelving proudly displays the residents’ knickknacks. In the living space, bare pendant lighting and a ceramic fireplace mimic the vertical placement of the home as well as nearby trees. The full-height windows fill the common areas with natural light . Thanks to their new location on a higher level in the home, bedrooms offer privacy and serenity for both kids and adults. From their beds, the family can look out to views of the backyard and nearby park. Although the home is two stories, the glass wall seamlessly integrates the two spaces. “This split level addition creates a dramatic new focal point in the house,” the architects said, “that connects all discrete parts of the house and introduces a dramatic relationship to its beautiful, natural surrounds.” + AM Architecture Images via Dianna Snape

Read more from the original source:
The spacious Camberwell House reconnects a large family with nature

Sculptural open-air pavilion blends into a rocky Norwegian landscape

June 29, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Sculptural open-air pavilion blends into a rocky Norwegian landscape

When Oslo-based design studio MORFEUS arkitekter first laid eyes on Bukkekjerka, a rock formation framed by the rugged mountains on the east and the open sea to the west, its natural beauty stunned them. So, when they were tasked with designing an open-air pavilion on the site along the Norwegian Scenic Route Andøya, they understandably wanted to take a sensitive approach so as not to detract from the landscape. The resulting design is a contemporary structure built from folded concrete to mimic the surrounding jagged mountain peaks. Spanning an area of 2,800 square feet, the Bukkekjerka rest station comprises a series of structures spread out across the landscape. The parking and service facilities are placed in the north, while a freestanding bench in the mountains is oriented for views of the midnight sun. Picnic areas and a footbridge trace a path toward the lighthouses to the east. Consecrated land and unique geological formations can be found in the south, which MORFEUS arkitekter has designed for use as an annual open-air church for weddings and other gatherings. “Our hope is that these elements are unveiled and experienced gradually, encouraging further exploration and experience of the inherent qualities of the place,” explains Caroline Støvring and Cecilie Wille of MORFEUS arkitekter. “The built elements are adapted to the existing terrain, not the other way around. We have wanted to proceed carefully, but also with a boldness that echoes the surrounding landscape. We have desired the project to appear more like landscape and sculptural elements, less like a building.” Related: Off-grid Fossil Discovery Exhibit camouflages into the Texan desert The majority of the structures are open-air; however, even the service building with toilets manages to embrace the landscape with one-way mirrored glass cladding. The glass allows visitors inside the building to enjoy views over the sea and the mountain peaks in the north, while the mirrored side helps blend the building into the landscape. The building is also constructed from polished, acid-resistant steel with a mirror-like shine. + MORFEUS arkitekter Images ©MORFEUS Støvring Wille

See more here: 
Sculptural open-air pavilion blends into a rocky Norwegian landscape

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 959 access attempts in the last 7 days.