How to properly and safely dispose of these 10 items in your home

February 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on How to properly and safely dispose of these 10 items in your home

Toxic chemicals, e-waste, light bulbs and batteries are just a few common household items that exit our homes and can end up in the landfill , where they may or may not break down or leach into the soil and water. Equally concerning is the potential for broken glass and chemicals to cause problems to sanitation workers, the water system and wildlife. Even when you make the best purchasing decisions upfront, you will eventually find yourself with toxic household waste. Before tossing items in the trash, check out these disposal options for items like batteries and paint that are safer for the planet. Tires Because most automotive, tractor and machine tires are a mixture of rubber and steel, they can’t be recycled without separating those components. As a result, you will likely have to pay to drop them somewhere. The landfill is one option, but you can commonly return them to a local tire center. Regardless of where you take it, the fee typically ranges from $2-10 per tire, so consider upcycling those old radials into a property border or flower bed divider. Related: EWG warns ‘forever chemicals’ are contaminating US drinking water at levels far worse than expected Light bulbs Your local recycling center probably accepts spent CFL light bulbs. Because CFL bulbs contain a small amount of mercury, it’s important that they are properly disposed of. Most large home improvement stores also provide a return option for CFLs and basic fluorescent bulbs. Depending on your local recycling center, LED or incandescent bulbs may be recyclable with your glass items. You can also visit Pinterest for ideas on ways to repurpose bulbs. Batteries The best option when it comes to batteries is to make the investment in rechargeable batteries. When they wear out, look for drop boxes at your local home improvement and office supply stores. For single-use household batteries, you can return them during city household waste collection events, or your recycling center may have a drop spot. Some home improvement stores also provide a drop location. Car, tractor and motorcycle batteries are easily recyclable at any retailer that sells them. You will likely even get a core refund for returning them. Check with automotive repair locations, car part stores or your local Battery Exchange. Electronics When the stereo, computer, TV or cell phone bites the dust, skip the landfill and head to the recycling center. You may need to separate the cords and/or batteries from the laptop or TV remote, but most components are accepted at these locations. Also check with the manufacturing company or service provider. For example, Apple and many cell phone companies will accept old devices for recycling, and some even offer a credit for it. Medications Expired and unneeded medications are absorbed into the soil and waterways if flushed down the toilet. They are also a danger to children and pets, so proper disposal is important. Most local police stations accept medications, and they can be returned at city waste collection events. The U.S. DEA also provides an annual National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day in conjunction with local law enforcement agencies. Stains and paints The good news is that modern paints and stains are formulated to last, so you can finish up the can while doing touch ups or other projects, even years down the road. If you’re moving and have to come up with a quick yet responsible disposal method, visit your local Habitat for Humanity reStore, where it will reformulate the paint for resale. Another option is to allow the paint to dry in the can, either naturally or with the aid of a commercial paint-dry product. Once dry, it can be thrown out with the rest of your garbage without a risk of contamination, although we do recommend using it entirely or donating it for resell before turning to the landfill. Related: 6 of the best places to donate your things Cleaning products Between glass cleaner and furniture polish, household cleaners have a way of accumulating. So when you pull out the last of the carpet and no longer need carpet spot cleaner or you make the switch to natural cleaners and need to do away with your old bottles, keep an eye out for that city waste collection event. For cleaners you can still use, try to use them up and recycle the container when you can. Also consider giving away any cleaners you no longer want, but note that most donation centers will not accept them, so offer them to friends, family and co-workers. Lawn and garden products Insecticides and pesticides should not be added to the garbage, where they can leak into water systems and soil. The same goes for the old oil and gasoline from your lawn mower and other equipment. This type of pollution will impact plants, animals and humans. Hold onto any lawn and garden chemicals for the next household waste round-up to return them responsibly. Personal care products If you find your bathroom cabinets and shelves full of old skincare , fragrances or nail polish you don’t want anymore, it is important to dispose of them properly, especially if they are from your pre-green beauty days. Unused, unexpired products may be suitable for donation. Otherwise, do not dump products in the sink or toilet. Check with your local hazardous household waste facility to see if it can accept your items. If you must, put all of the contents of the containers into one jar and place it in the garbage. Eyeglasses Whether you’ve undergone laser eye surgery or upgraded your style, eyewear is another common household item that may no longer be serving its purpose. Fortunately, there are many ways to donate old eyeglasses where they can provide the gift of sight and keep them out of the landfills. Lyons Clubs International, New Eyes (a division of United Way), OnSight and Eyes of Hope are all options. You can also drop eyeglass lenses and frames at most optical centers or local drop boxes, or donate them to a thrift store. Via Earth 911 and EPA.gov Images via Shutterstock

More here: 
How to properly and safely dispose of these 10 items in your home

Light-filled home makes the most of affordable, sustainable materials

February 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Light-filled home makes the most of affordable, sustainable materials

Proving that building on a budget doesn’t have to mean compromising on aesthetics, Uruguayan architecture practice Bercetche Estudio has completed the WS House, a single-family home on the outskirts of Montevideo. Built primarily with unpainted natural timber inside and out, the home takes on a minimalist design that highlights its simple palette of natural materials. A strong connection with the outdoors and access to natural light is also emphasized throughout the home. Located in the La Tahona neighborhood about a half-hour drive east from the capital, the WS House stands out from its suburban neighbors with its contemporary form comprising boxy, flat-roofed volumes of varying heights. Spanning an area of nearly 2,750 square feet, the home is shaped like a horseshoe that wraps around the main entrance. Oversized square pavers that lead from the road to the front door emphasize the geometry of the home, while the timber cladding is applied in both horizontal and vertical orientations for visual interest. Related: Danish home champions wood over concrete for lower carbon emissions The main entrance leads directly to the open-plan living area, dining room and kitchen, which seamlessly connect to the outdoor terrace with a sunken circular pool through sliding glass doors. Flanking the main living areas are two bedroom wings: the master bedroom with an en suite bathroom is located on one side, and a secondary bedroom wing contains three flex rooms and two baths. Large windows let in ample natural light and views of the outdoors. “It is an easy-to-read house, built with sustainable and economical materials, which prove that with well-manipulated basic components, an expressive and energy-efficient house can be made,” the architects explained. “[The house] shows great respect for the environment and, through a nice space distribution, takes advantage of it. Two opaque volumes separated from each other generates a permeable ‘in between’ that gives rise to all the common activities of the house.” + Bercetche Estudio Photography by Sebastian Aguilar via Bercetche Estudio

Here is the original: 
Light-filled home makes the most of affordable, sustainable materials

How your salon visit contributes to your carbon footprint

September 24, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on How your salon visit contributes to your carbon footprint

As the services available at salons evolve, waste, pollution and exposure to toxins have increasingly become part of the experience. When one considers that the beauty industry creates 420,000 pounds of waste every day in America alone, it’s not difficult to see why we should be aware of the carbon footprint your hair services actually create. One salon is hoping to change that to help clients feel their best without increasing their carbon footprints. Benjamin Novak Hudgins of Novak Hair Studios in the Dallas-Fort Worth area took a stand against this waste, and now runs a massive, 10,000 square-foot, zero-waste salon that employs more than 70 stylists and provides hair care for over 5,000 clients each month. Novak Hair Studios has successfully taken steps to remedy the many wasteful practices and is setting an example for other salons around the world. Related: Find Bliss in this natural, cruelty-free and affordable skincare Water  Reports have estimated that stylists use anywhere between 16 and 75 gallons of water per hour from rinsing out color, washing hair and cleaning supplies. Most of this is flushed directly down the drain. Multiply that by 6 to 12 clients each day per hairdresser, and you can begin to see the issue. To handle water consumption, the salon installed fixtures designed to cut water usage by 65 percent. All hair color is collected so that it doesn’t head into the sewer system, and even hair trimmings are put to good use. “We even found a way to repurpose human hair for cleaning up oil spills in rivers, lakes and oceans,” Hudgens said. Hair dye Ammonia and other chemicals included in hair dyes are rinsed into the drainage system. Although treated, commercial filters do not remove all of these chemicals, some of which have been linked to cancer, before they are reintroduced into the supply of potable water. In addition, the chemical offsetting during application puts the stylist and client at risk for inhaling the toxins. According to Hudgens, all hair color at Novak Hair Studios is diverted from being filtered back into the community’s drinking water, and the salon uses a plant-based hair product line, Eufora. Waste At most salons, trash cans overflow with plastic, foil, tubes, gloves and other waste that totals about 150,000,000 pounds of trash annually for the beauty industry. The average hair color treatment requires around 25 feet of aluminum foil. While foil can be recycled , it is only accepted if it is clean and dry, a step rarely taken in salons. In the trash heap, foil can take 200 to 400 years to break down. The salon boasts an impressive 95 percent rate of waste being diverted from landfills through its dedication to sustainable actions. In addition to sorting out hair clippings and dyes, all foil is cleaned and recycled; paper products, plastics and hair color gloves are also recycled. “The most effective solution we have found is partnering with Green Circle Salons, who helps manage all of the recycling solutions,” Hudgens said. “When you pair Green Circle’s resources up with creating accessible recycling stations throughout the salon, it makes sustainability a breeze.” To reduce electricity waste, the entire salon uses motion-sensored LED lights in addition to an abundance of windows that provide natural light. Air quality As part of Hudgens’ Clean Air Initiative, the salon revamped its air system and incorporated air-filtering plants into the space, providing consistent fresh air to the dozens of stylists and clients at all times. “My first fight was to confront cancer-causing and allergy-inducing products that are so commonly used in salons,” Hudgens said. “The final step to that initiative was the architectural design of our space. By leaving each individual studio’s ceiling exposed, we were able to create an open path for chemicals to directly enter the air filtration system and allow clean air flow into every space.” A salon changing the industry standard The biggest piece of the puzzle is awareness. There is a need for change that can only come about when the industry and clients realize the impact hair services have on the planet and make a conscious decision to do something about it. Consumers appreciate a conscientious business, meaning that sustainably minded salons will likely see an increase in business, which is a win for the company and the environment. Plus, it makes you and me feel better about that visit to the salon. “I quickly learned Fort Worth cares more than I could have ever imagined,” Hudgens said. “In just a year and a half of being open, we see more than 5,000 people a month. Not a single day goes by without our team being thanked for making a difference in our global impact and giving our clients the opportunity to choose a sustainable future in beauty.” + Novak Hair Studios Images via Novak Hair Studios, Social Butterfly MMG , Maria Geller , Arturs Budkevics and Adam Winger

Continued here: 
How your salon visit contributes to your carbon footprint

Biodegradable tableware made from wheat bran debuts at Toronto’s Green Living Show

March 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Biodegradable tableware made from wheat bran debuts at Toronto’s Green Living Show

This week, Toronto citizens learned that wheat bran is good for more than enhancing digestive regularity. An innovative Polish company displayed its disposable, biodegradable tableware made from unprocessed wheat bran at Toronto’s Green Living Show. While an ordinary disposable plastic plate could take 500 years to break down, Biotrem’s tableware biodegrades through composting within a single month. They’re made from compressed wheat bran, a by-product of the cereal milling process. Biotrem can make up to 10,000 biodegradable plates and bowls from one ton of wheat bran. Related: Shellworks upcycles leftover lobster shells into biodegradable bioplastics The wheat bran tableware can handle hot or cold food, liquid or solids and is microwave-safe. From picnic spots to barrooms, the new biodegradable cups and plates could decrease landfill -bound garbage. Wheat farmer and miller Jerzy Wysocki devised the process of turning wheat bran into plates. Every time he milled wheat, Wysocki found himself with excess wheat bran. Through trial and error, he discovered that mixing the bran with water, then heating and pressurizing it resulted in a sturdy material. He started what would grow into Biotrem with a single machine that he built on his farm . Biotrem’s production plant in Zambrow can currently produce about 15 million biodegradable bowls and plates per year. They also make disposable cutlery, which combines wheat bran with fully biodegradable PLA bio-plastic. So far, Biotrem products are available in a dozen European countries, the U.S., Canada, South Korea and Lebanon. Transform Events & Consulting, based in Charlottestown, Prince Edward Island, distributes Biotrem products to the Canadian market. The event company introduced more consumers to wheat bran plates at this month’s Green Living Show at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. “As event organizers, we see just how much plastic waste is generated at events of all kinds, especially festivals,” said Mark Carr-Rollitt, owner of Transform Events & Consulting. “We are thrilled to partner with Biotrem to offer a well-designed, viable alternative to single use plastics.” Via Biotrem Images Biotrem

Here is the original: 
Biodegradable tableware made from wheat bran debuts at Toronto’s Green Living Show

Earthling Survey: Are You Sure Your Recycling Doesn’t Go Into a Landfill?

July 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Earthling Survey: Are You Sure Your Recycling Doesn’t Go Into a Landfill?

Express your opinion and help drive environmental change. Every week, … The post Earthling Survey: Are You Sure Your Recycling Doesn’t Go Into a Landfill? appeared first on Earth911.com.

See the rest here:
Earthling Survey: Are You Sure Your Recycling Doesn’t Go Into a Landfill?

Survey Results: Do You Eat Less Meat?

July 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Survey Results: Do You Eat Less Meat?

Thanks to those of you who responded to last week’s … The post Survey Results: Do You Eat Less Meat? appeared first on Earth911.com.

Here is the original post:
Survey Results: Do You Eat Less Meat?

10 Things in Your Closet You Can Reuse or Recycle

September 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on 10 Things in Your Closet You Can Reuse or Recycle

Many of us put off cleaning out our homes, which means by the time we get around doing so, we want the old stuff out as quickly as possible. Closets especially tend to accumulate extra stuff, but the landfill doesn’t have to be the end destination…

Read the rest here:
10 Things in Your Closet You Can Reuse or Recycle

IKEA plans to cut food waste in half by 2020 heres how

August 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on IKEA plans to cut food waste in half by 2020 heres how

You now have one more reason to love IKEA . By 2020, the Swedish company plans to cut food waste by 50% at its stores — including its restaurants and smaller bistros. To accomplish this, employees will use digital scales to record the type and weight of food sent to the bin. In turn, they will learn the cost of the discarded food and its carbon footprint . Over time, the data will help the company make big changes. In the US and UK, between 30 and 40 percent of all food is tossed into landfills . This conundrum persists, despite the fact that 795 million people worldwide go to bed hungry each evening. IKEA’s new initiative will not only reduce the amount of methane pumped into the atmosphere as a result of rotting produce, it will hopefully encourage other corporations to tackle food waste in their own spheres. Said Ylva Magnusson, communications manager for IKEA Food. “Our ambition is to work together to create positive change together with other organizations and companies.” The new food waste system was launched in 2015 and rolled out to stores in December of 2016. By May 2017, 20 percent of IKEA stores had it installed. As a result, there has been a reduction in nearly 80,000 pounds of food waste. IKEA is now in the process of implementing the system in all of its 400 stores, which serve 650 million customers a year. When an employee enters the type and weight of a food into the new system, they are also required to record why it was discarded. Options include overproduced, expired, spoiled or trimmings (such as the top of a tomato). The process takes seconds, but it will ultimately help the company’s restaurants become much more efficient. As a result of the recorded data, IKEA’s menu is likely to change. If a certain part of an entree is regularly documented to be untouched, IKEA will take this into account to reduce food waste . Said Peter Ho, IKEA U.S. food sales leader, “If we do see a significant amount of waste over a specific period of time–let’s say at 2:00 every day we’re wasting so many meatballs–then that says for us that we’re overproducing, and if we’re overproducing , then we can train our co-workers to minimize that waste.” For the initiative, IKEA partnered with LeanPath – the company that produces the digital scale. The company’s CEO, Andrew Shakman, said, “The moment you start measuring with technology you begin to change awareness levels and you cause people to start to think differently. Whereas in the past they could just throw something in the garbage , now they have to stop and for a moment; they have to record something about it. In that moment, you’re not just collecting data, you’re communicating your values.” Related: IKEA is now selling solar panels and home batteries in the UK “What you’re doing is really engaging your front line and enlisting them as the change makers on this hugely important global issue ,” he added. “They are uniquely positioned to resolve it.” In addition to reducing food waste in its own kitchens, the company will also encourage consumers to waste less. This is critical, as the Swedish company estimates that “plate waste” makes up about 50 percent of total food waste. At a later date, IKEA will also work with suppliers to reduce waste upstream. As Fast Company reports, both plans fit in with IKEA’s larger vision to produce more renewable energy than it uses by 2020 and to offer more vegetarian products that have a smaller environmental footprint than traditional options. + Ikea Via Fast Company Images via Wikimedia , Pixabay , IKEA

Go here to see the original: 
IKEA plans to cut food waste in half by 2020 heres how

"Mount Trashmore" of Massachusetts transformed into clean energy hub

July 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on "Mount Trashmore" of Massachusetts transformed into clean energy hub

Who says there’s no such thing as second chances? An historically off-putting landfill in Brockton, Massachusetts, which was once dubbed Mount Trashmore for its overwhelming bad odor, has been transformed from a wasted space to a generator of clean renewable energy . This week, a new solar power system opened above the previously underutilized space at Thatcher Street in Brockton. Local officials estimate the new clean energy infrastructure installed on-site will offset the carbon emissions of more than 12,000 cars annually and will generate more than $300,000 in annual revenue for the city. The Brockton project is not the first instance of Massachusetts turning previously dead space into a net positive for the community. All along the Mass Pike, also known as Interstate 90, the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, in collaboration with private contractors, has installed solar panel arrays that make use of the land between the highway shoulder and privately owned residential and commercial plots. Over the next twenty years, these highway clean power plants are estimated to generate at least $15 million of revenue for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Related: 8 incredible parks created from landfills While these renewable energy additions to landfills are a welcome improvement, landfills themselves are relatively modern innovations in the United States. Before Congress passed the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act in 1976, trash was usually just dumped in massive holes in the ground, which created significant, unceasing environmental hazards, from increased methane in the atmosphere to leaching toxic chemicals into local groundwater. After the RCRA was passed, disposal facilities were required to be properly lined and equipped with vents through which methane may be burned. However, this increased costs, which incentivized municipalities to build larger landfills. In order to bring trash from disparate locations to one mega landfill, more greenhouse gases must be burned in their transportation. To solve this problem, perhaps Congress could take a second look at the RCRA and ensure that all landfills offset their emissions, like Mount Trashmore in Brockton. Via CBS Boston Lead image via Depositphotos , others via Flickr   (1)

Read more from the original source:
"Mount Trashmore" of Massachusetts transformed into clean energy hub

Tiny Wirmboden chapel in Austria is made of stone sourced on-site

July 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Tiny Wirmboden chapel in Austria is made of stone sourced on-site

Nestled in an alpine valley in Western Austria, this tiny chapel is a serene haven for local farmers. After an avalanche destroyed the town’s original chapel, including several other huts in 2012, the community decided to rebuild, so they commissioned Innauer-Matt Architects to design a space for gatherings and celebrations using locally-sourced materials.   The Wirmboden chapel is located in at the foot of the steep north face of the valley’s Kanisfluh mountain in Austria . Local farmers organized the initiative to rebuild the original structure, destroyed by an avalanche in 2012. Built over the course of three years, the chapel complements the surrounding alpine architecture and offers a space where people can gather, celebrate and pray. Related: Modern chapel makes a powerful but minimalist statement in the Austrian countryside Locally sourced stone make up the walls of the building, with rough split shingles covering the steep truss. A roof opening brings natural light into the interior. Memorial photo cards were placed in the space between rafters to commemorate loved ones. The entrance, truss and bell space were made from German spruce conventionally used for making violins and guitars. + Innauer-Matt Architects Via Archdaily Photos by Adolf Bereuter

See more here: 
Tiny Wirmboden chapel in Austria is made of stone sourced on-site

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 13161 access attempts in the last 7 days.