Stunning Lake Michigan home is built from dying ash reclaimed onsite

October 2, 2017 by  
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This stunning timber home by the lake sensitively embraces its Midwestern landscape with its design and use of local, reclaimed materials. Designed by Desai Chia Architects in collaboration with Environment Architects (AOR) , the Michigan Lake House boasts stunning lake views and a striking folded roof. The site-sensitive home features a native plant palette and stormwater management in addition to locally sourced and salvaged materials. Located on a woodland bluff, the 4,800-square-foot Michigan Lake House comprises three offset structures: one for the communal areas, including the living room, kitchen, and covered terrace; and the two others that separately house the master bedroom suite and three children’s bedrooms. A dining area breezeway connects the three structures. The undulating roof takes inspiration from the natural rolling terrain as well as the vernacular architecture of nearby fishing villages. The roof also cantilevers over the south end of the home to provide shade for the lakeside-viewing terrace. Related: Exquisite Shore House is a modernist triumph that embraces nature Shou Sugi Ban timber—charred to protect the wood from rot and pests—clads the exterior to blend the home into the landscape. The use of dark timber continues inside the home but is offset by light-colored ash, which was inhabitat.com/tag/reclaimed-materials reclaimed onsite and milled into custom furnishings, flooring, ceiling panels, and trim work. “The interiors of the house embody the indigenous landscape that once thrived with old growth ash,” wrote the architects. Locally sourced stone was used for the outdoor seating areas, pathways, and steps. + Desai Chia Architects + Environment Architects Images via Desai Chia Architects

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Stunning Lake Michigan home is built from dying ash reclaimed onsite

OMAs MPavilion 2017 with a floating roof opens today in Melbourne

October 2, 2017 by  
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Melbourne is heating up for the summer with a new OMA-designed amphitheater. OMA founder Rem Koolhaas and colleague Daniel Gianotten just completed MPavilion 2017, a temporary pavilion that opened today in Melbourne’s Queen Victoria Gardens. Commissioned by the Naomi Milgrom Foundation, MPavilion 2017 is the fourth annual architect-designed summer pavilion for the city and is OMA’s first Australian commission. The multifunctional amphitheater will host hundreds of free events throughout the four-month season. OMA designed MPavilion 2017 as a 19-by-19-meter aluminum-clad steel structure that transforms to accommodate a variety of unexpected programming. Surrounded by an artificial hill landscaped with native plants , the adaptable amphitheater comprises one fixed tiered grandstand and one moveable grandstand that rotates to open up to the park. The floating translucent roof is built with a two-meter-deep gridded, machine-like canopy with embedded advanced lighting technology. Related: Studio Mumbai unveils handmade pavilion crafted from seven kilometers of bamboo “Our design for MPavilion 2017 is intended to provoke all kinds of activities through its configurable nature and a materiality that relates to its direct surroundings,” said Rem Koolhaas and David Gianotten of OMA. “We are happy that MPavilion can perform as a theater of debate around the city and its development, and contribute to the ongoing civic discourse of Melbourne.” MPavilion will be open everyday from 9AM to 4PM until February 4, 2018. At the end of the four-month season MPavilion will be moved to a permanent new home within Melbourne’s Central Business District. + OMA + MPavilion 2017 Images by Timothy Burgess and John Gollings

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OMAs MPavilion 2017 with a floating roof opens today in Melbourne

Dreamy holiday home by the lake makes the most of a small footprint

May 30, 2016 by  
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Commissioned by a family of five who sought a simple country getaway from Bratislava , the holiday home is sited on an island in the Danube River overlooking beautiful lakeside views. With only 65 square meters to work with, the architects organized the home around a large open-plan central living room and exposes a tall vaulted ceiling to create a sense of spaciousness. Natural light pours into the building through large glazed folding doors that open up to the adjacent lake and extend the footprint of the home to the outdoors. Whereas the building facade is mostly painted white, the timber-lined interior features a playful and eye-catching pop of color in the wall and shelving partition painted vibrant green. The partition opposite the green-painted wall is made from masonry blocks that absorb thermal energy from the fireplace and gradually release the heat over time. Both partition walls hide the sleeping areas and bathrooms, which include a master bedroom on one end and two sets of bunk beds on the other. Loft space beneath the rafters on both ends of the home can be used to accommodate extra guests or as play area for children. Related: JRKVC’s IST House Uses Traditional Slovakian Building Techniques to Reduce its Footprint “Outside the cabin is almost monochrome, just natural wood and white painted cladding,” says architect Peter Jurkovi?. “No details. All attention is paid to the essential part of the house, which is inside. There we find the beauty, colors and textures.” + JRKVC Via Dezeen Images via Peter Jurkovi?

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Statue of Liberty, Venice among world heritage sites at risk from climate change

May 30, 2016 by  
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The Statue of Liberty, Venice, Stonehenge, Galápagos islands and Easter Island are among the 31 natural and cultural world heritage sites in 29 countries that are threatened by climate change , according to a new report . Titled “World Heritage and Tourism in a Changing Climate,” the study was launched by UNESCO, the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) at the the UN Environmental Assembly in Nairobi, Kenya. “Globally, we need to better understand, monitor and address climate change threats to World Heritage sites,” said Mechtild Rössler, director of UNESCO’s World Heritage Center. “As the report’s findings underscore, achieving the Paris Agreement’s goal of limiting global temperature rise to a level well below 2°C is vitally important to protecting our World Heritage for current and future generations.” Related: Five Pacific Ocean islands have already disappeared because of climate change The report finds that the iconic tourism sites are vulnerable to increasing temperatures, melting glaciers, rising seas, intensifying weather events, worsening droughts and longer wildfire seasons. Scientists involved in the study stressed the importance of global warming mitigation, stating that reducing greenhouse gases and restoring ecosystems in line with the Paris Agreement is “vital for the future of World Heritage.” According to the study, climate resilience will be important to protecting the sites. Venice is taking action on climate change adaptation with the building of the Mose flood barrier project . Related: Venice’s $7 Billion Moses Flood-Protection System Passes its First Test The report is not without controversy. It was revealed that the government of Australia pressured UNESCO to remove any mention of Australia in relation to the country’s wold heritage sites, including the Great Barrier Reef. The scrubbing of any references to Australia comes at a time when 93 percent of the Great Barrier Reef has been hit by coral bleaching. While Australia claimed it would impact tourism, Will Steffen, a scientific reviewer of the report, called the tactics reminiscent of “the old Soviet Union.” + Report: World Heritage and Tourism in a Changing Climate Via The Guardian Images via Flickr and Wikipedia

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Low-energy Lake House is a chic summer getaway in Austria

September 14, 2015 by  
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Superkul’s Shift Cottage is a Passive Lakeside Oasis That Connects With Nature

October 14, 2011 by  
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Read the rest of Superkul’s Shift Cottage is a Passive Lakeside Oasis That Connects With Nature Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: canada , eco design , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green home , green lake house , lake house , lake huron , passive house , shift cottage , superkul , superkul architects , Sustainable Building , sustainable design

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Superkul’s Shift Cottage is a Passive Lakeside Oasis That Connects With Nature

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