Clean energy-producing Light Up wins the 2018 LAGI competition in Melbourne

October 18, 2018 by  
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New York-based NH Architecture and Seattle architectural practice Olson Kundig placed first and second respectively in the 2018 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition in Melbourne, Australia. Sponsored by the State of Victoria’s Renewable Energy Action Plan with clean energy targets of 25 percent by 2020, the international competition sought large-scale works of public art that generate renewable energy in visible ways for St. Kilda Triangle in the City of Port Phillip. NH Architecture’s winning proposal, named ‘Light Up,’ harnesses solar, wind and microbial fuel cell technologies to produce 2,200 MWh of energy annually — enough to power nearly 500 homes. NH Architecture’s winning Light Up proposal consists of a lightweight tensile shade structure topped with 8,600 efficient, flexible solar photovoltaic panels envisioned over Jacka Boulevard. Designed with the aim of “maximizing the public realm” without compromising views, the design makes use of tested components available on the market. The clean energy power plant was also designed to harness wind energy and uses microbial fuel cells to tap into energy from plant roots. Olson Kundig’s second-place submission ‘Night & Day’ also taps into the power of solar with 5,400 square meters of solar panels. The solar system is combined with two Pelton turbines and a hydro battery to operate 24 hours a day and produce 1,000 MWh annually. As an ideas competition, LAGI 2018 has no plans of realizing the winning submissions. The Light Up team will receive $16,000 in prize money while the runners-up will receive $5,000. Related: Olson Kundig solar sail proposal could power up to 200 Melbourne homes with clean energy “LAGI 2018 is a window into a world that has moved beyond fossil fuels — a world that celebrates living in harmony with nature by creating engaging public places that integrate renewable energy and energy storage artfully within the urban landscape,” said LAGI co-founders Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry. “Light Up and Night & Day are power plants where you can take your family for a picnic. They both show how beauty and clean energy can come together to create the sustainable and resilient infrastructure of the future city. These artworks are cultural landmarks for the great energy transition that will be visited by generations in the future to remember this important time in human history.” + LAGI Images via LAGI

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Clean energy-producing Light Up wins the 2018 LAGI competition in Melbourne

Olson Kundig solar sail proposal could power up to 200 Melbourne homes with clean energy

October 10, 2018 by  
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Acclaimed architecture practice Olson Kundig is best known for its spectacular residential works in the Pacific Northwest, yet the Seattle-based firm has embarked on somewhat new ground in its recent submission to the 2018 Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) competition . Held this year in Melbourne, the international contest has invited designers to create a large-scale and site-specific public artwork that could generate clean energy for the city. In response, Olson Kundig developed Night and Day, a massive solar sail concept designed to produce 1,000 MWh of clean energy through a combination of solar energy and a hydro battery. Launched as part of Victoria State’s Renewable Energy Action Plan and Melbourne’s 2020 net-zero energy goals, the 2018 Land Art Generator Initiative competition promotes a “clean energy landscape for a post-carbon world.” Olson Kundig’s Night and Day submission taps into that vision with a sculptural hydro-solar generator that uses eye-catching design to bring clean energy to the forefront of the public’s eye. Proposed for St. Kilda Triangle on Port Phillip Bay, the renewable energy power plant could power up to 200 homes with emissions-free energy, 24 hours a day. During the day, the curved solar sail — topped with 5,400 square meters of photovoltaic panels — collects energy and powers a pump that directs water into a suspended hydro battery vessel. At night, that water would be discharged through two Pelton turbines and transformed by a generator into electricity — a design solution that addresses the common problem of energy storage. Modular and scalable, the Night and Day proposal could also be installed at various sites. Related: This massive Sun Ray could sustainably power 220 homes in Melbourne “This was different because it wasn’t just about creating architecture, something for the pleasure of its inhabitants,” said principal and owner Kevin Kudo-King of the submission, which also doubles as a pedestrian bridge. “It also needed to function as a machine, and it needed to generate power.” The winners of the 2018 LAGI Melbourne competition will be announced at an awards ceremony on October 11, 2018 at Fed Square, Melbourne . + Olson Kundig Images via LAGI

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Olson Kundig solar sail proposal could power up to 200 Melbourne homes with clean energy

Martian tiny home prototype champions zero waste and self sufficiency

October 10, 2018 by  
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International practice OPEN Architecture has teamed up with Chinese electronics giant Xiaomi to design MARS Case, a futuristic proposal for Martian living that takes inspiration from Henry David Thoreau’s Walden . Designed for easy transportation, the lightweight and compact housing prototype was unveiled to the public for the first time outside the Bird’s Nest Stadium in Beijing as part of China House Vision, a multidisciplinary and experimental platform for ideas about the future of housing. The tiny home combines the principles of zero waste and self-sufficiency in a rejection of modern consumer excess. When asked to explore new possibilities for the future of housing, OPEN Architecture decided to push the envelope and begin its project with a dystopian premise that envisions humanity forced to settle on Mars . To design a home fit for human habitation on the planet, the architects designed a tiny home that is built on the idea of recycling. “There, we have no choice but to reduce the excessive consumption of four former lifestyles and carry only minimal essentials,” the firm said. “ Recycling will be the only way we survive. As we find new appreciation in every drop of water, every bite of food and every breath of air, will we at last discover the freedom of truly simple living? Is this what we should define as the idea house of the future?” Related: This off-grid, lunar lander-inspired tiny home is out of this world Measuring 2.4 meters by 2.4 meters by 2 meters, this “ideal” MARS Case house relies heavily on green technology, namely with the integration of domestic appliances in Xiaomi’s current product lines that can be controlled remotely via smartphone. The heat and condensation generated by the electronic devices would be harnessed, filtered and recycled to create an “integrated ecosystem.” + OPEN Architecture Via ArchDaily Images by WU Qingshan and Xiaomi

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Martian tiny home prototype champions zero waste and self sufficiency

This massive Sun Ray could sustainably power 220 homes in Melbourne

July 17, 2018 by  
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What if renewable energy infrastructure could be both functional and beautiful? Exploring that notion is Italian architectural practice Antonio Maccà, who designed ‘Sun Ray,’ a massive solar collector that could generate enough energy to power 220 Melbourne homes — with approximately 1,100 MWh of electricity produced annually. Shortlisted for this year’s Land Art Generator Initiative Melbourne design competition, the conceptual design was conceived as a symbol for the future of sustainable energy that also doubles as public artwork. Envisioned for the City of Port Phillip in Melbourne , Sun Ray consists of a series of flat mirrors — each with a single-axis tracking system — laid out in a round shape with a diameter of 279 feet and elevated atop slender steel columns. To capture the sun’s energy, Antonio Maccà tapped into linear Fresnel reflector technology, in which mirrors are used to focus sunlight onto a solar receiver. A power block tucked underground transforms the solar energy into electricity before feeding it into the city power grid. “Sun Ray is a new symbol of renewable energy, lighting the way to the State of Victoria’s zero- greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions target,” explained Antonio Maccà in his project statement. “It is also a cultural attractor for Melbourne, an investigation of light as a physical and symbolic source of illumination for life. It is a place for reflection, relaxation, learning and play — and it is a linear Fresnel reflector solar power plant that provides heat and electricity for hundreds of homes in St Kilda.” Related: This gigantic solar hourglass could power 1,000 Danish homes Residents and visitors can interact with the Sun Ray by using it as a shade canopy. The 50 primary mirror lines cast shade over the public park space, while the mirrors create a constantly changing play of light and shadow as they turn to track the sun. The winning design of the 2018 Land Art Generator Initiative Melbourne will be announced on October 11. + Land Art Generator Initiative Renderings by Antonio Maccà

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This massive Sun Ray could sustainably power 220 homes in Melbourne

Land Art Generator Initiative Santa Monica winners address California’s energy needs and drought

October 5, 2016 by  
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John Eric Chung, Pablo La Roche, Danxi Zou, Jingyan Zhang, and Tianyi Deng (CallisonRTKL), a submission to the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition for Santa Monica Teams from all around the world competed in the competition, and the first place winners are based in Tokyo, Japan. Christopher Sjoberg and Ryo Saito designed the Regatta H2O, ethereal sailboat-like installations that capture energy through “aerostatic flutter wind harvesting” and capture water through fog harvesting. Operating via the energy it collects, the regatta would generate 112 million liters, or nearly 30 million gallons, of drinking water yearly. Related: Solar-powered Pipe desalinizes 1.5 billion gallons of drinking water for California Keegan Oneal, Sean Link, Caitlin Vanhauer, and Colin Poranski, a submission to the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition for Santa Monica The second place winner is Cetacea, created by a team from Eugene, Oregon. Keegan Oneal, Sean Link, Caitlin Vanhauer, and Colin Poranski from the University of Oregon designed the installation inspired by blue whales’ ability to power themselves by tiny krill. Cetacea draws on three types of energy – wind, solar, and wave – and collects 650 million liters of drinking water yearly via “high efficiency reverse osmosis” ( HERO by Aquatech ). 80 percent of the 4,300 megawatt hours of energy generated by Cetacea would be used to “offset the energy demand” of the HERO system and Santa Monica’s SMURRF facility . Christopher Makrinos, Stephen Makrinos, and Alexander Bishop, a submission to the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition for Santa Monica Third place goes to Christopher Makrinos, Stephen Makrinos, and Alexander Bishop of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They designed Paper Boats, boat-shaped installations whose sails function as “concentrated photovoltaic collectors.” Paper Boats would utilize Holographic Planar Concentrator technology from Prism Solar Technologies to generate 2,400 megawatt hours of power each year. Matt Kuser, a submission to the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition for Santa Monica LAGI founding directors Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry said in a statement, “The winners of LAGI 2016 all responded to the design brief with elegant site-specific gestures for the cherished coastal landscape of the Santa Monica Bay. These innovative and artistic solutions that employ the latest wave, tidal, wind, solar, and water-harvesting technologies have resonance for coastal cities around the world.” Aitor Almaraz and Sonia Vázquez-Díaz, a submission to the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition for Santa Monica There are 21 other finalists, from a desalinizing pipe to a solar-powered rotating farm and desalination plant to a freshwater-creating orb comprised of transparent solar concentrators . + Land Art Generator Initiative Images courtesy of the Land Art Generator Initiative

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Land Art Generator Initiative Santa Monica winners address California’s energy needs and drought

Solar-powered Ring Garden marries desalination and agriculture for drought-stricken California

August 25, 2016 by  
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With roughly 80 percent of California’s already-scarce water supply going to agriculture, it’s crucial for the state to embrace new technologies that shrink the amount of water required to grow food. Alexandru Predonu has designed an elegant solution that uses solar energy to power a rotating desalination plant and farm that not only produces clean drinking water for the city of Santa Monica, but also food crops – including algae. A finalist of this year’s Land Art Generator Initiative competition , a site-specific biennial design competition that has inspired world-renowned designs like The Pipe and Energy Duck , Ring Garden is capable of churning out 16 million gallons of clean water, 40,000 pounds of aeroponic crops, and 11,000 pounds of spirulina biomass for livestock feed. A desalination plant , rotating aeroponics farm, and algae bioreactor in one, Ring Garden is designed to “harvest seawater, CO2, and the sun’s energy to create food, biomass, and fresh water,” according to Predonu’s design brief. The plant is powered by photovoltaic panels that produce 440 MWh each year. 100 percent of that energy is used to power the desalination process and rotate the garden. “Seawater enters the desalination plant through special screens that protect fish and local wildlife,” he said. “Solar panels power a high-pressure pump to pressurize seawater above the osmotic pressure and through a semi permeable membrane.” Clean water resulting from this process is then divvied up – 60 percent irrigates the rotating plants, 30 percent is sent to the city grid, while the remaining brine water, which would be potentially toxic to marine life, is fed through the bioreactor to cultivate spirulina for biomass . Related: Solar-powered Pipe desalinizes 1.5 billion gallons of drinking water for California “The aeroponics system uses 98% less water than conventional farming and yields on average 30% more crops without the need for pesticides or fertilizers,” says Predonu. “Ring Garden demonstrates that the main elements a plant needs in order to grow—water, sun, nutrients, and CO2— are on site and don’t need to be transported. On a footprint of about 1,000 m2 (10,764 square feet) the farm can produce vegetables that would otherwise take 26,000 m2 (279,862 square feet) of land and 340 million gallons of fresh water per year.” If built, Ring Garden would consume just nine million gallons of water annually, according to Predonu, and redirect 331 million gallons that would otherwise evaporate to 2,300 California households. Every good LAGI design is expected to have a compelling public art and educational component, and Ring Garden delivers. Not only is the design slightly tilted so that the sun will shine right through the middle of the wheel on Earth Day (April 22), but visitors are welcome to visit the facility by boat, and pick vegetables and plant new ones at an outdoor aeroponics garden. There would also be a Eco Awareness Center designed to inform the public about the benefits and necessity of sustainable innovations that promise a more hopeful future. The winners of LAGI 2016: Santa Monica will be announced at Greenbuild in October . + LAGI 2016: Santa Monica + Alexandru Predonu

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Solar-powered Ring Garden marries desalination and agriculture for drought-stricken California

6 Brilliant Solar-Powered Art Projects to Brighten Your Day

March 13, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of 6 Brilliant Solar-Powered Art Projects to Brighten Your Day Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 6 solar-powered artworks , Alexandre Dang , Art , Dang’cing Flowers , environmental art , environmental design , green art , green design , Harris & Heder , Israel , Jerusalem , LAGI , land art generator initiative , LOOP.PH , Nacho Zamora , Night Garden , North Design Office , O*GE , PV stained glass , Sarah Hall , Solar Power , solar powered art , sonumbra , Sunflower , The Verdant Walk

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6 Brilliant Solar-Powered Art Projects to Brighten Your Day

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