The How2Recycle label needs a massive campaign. Brands should make it happen

September 22, 2020 by  
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The How2Recycle label needs a massive campaign. Brands should make it happen Suzanne Shelton Tue, 09/22/2020 – 01:00 I hope you’ve downloaded our latest free report, “Engaging Middle America in Recycling Solutions.” . We conducted that research because we were curious about whether Americans were aware of what was happening with our recycling system — that most Asian countries no longer will take our plastics off our hands, many municipal curbside programs are shutting down and many plastics we’re all putting in our recycling bins are being landfilled — and, if they were aware, what was the impact on their recycling behaviors? We also wanted to understand what could keep them engaged once they understood that they need to do things better or differently to ensure everything they chuck in the bin actually gets recycled. That led us to ask the following questions: How often do you look for an item’s recycling label before discarding it? Some companies have started including new labeling on their packaging showing which parts of the package are recyclable (see sample image). Have you noticed any new recycling labeling on the packaging of things you buy? We made a high-level, perhaps seemingly cavalier recommendation in the report (and in my GreenBiz article about it ) that most Americans haven’t noticed the How2Recycle label — a standardized labeling system that clearly communicates recycling instructions to the public — or find it too hard to read and that we need a massive campaign to teach people to look before they toss. It’s worth unpacking this because there’s a key insight for brands. First off, only 22 percent of Americans say they always look for an item’s recycling label before discarding the item — so one in five people. Of those, 66 percent have noticed the new label, the How2Recycle label pictured above. One in five Americans are diligently working to discard a brand’s packaging properly. For the folks who have noticed — the 66 percent of the 22 percent — the vast majority (86 percent) find the label helpful and feel that the label makes it easier to know which parts of a package are actually recyclable. Two-thirds of this group of “Always Recyclers” who’ve noticed the How2Recycle label say they feel frustrated that parts of the package aren’t recyclable. (If you read the free report , this makes sense — we all really want to believe in the guilt-absolving promise of recycling.) Half of this group say the label is too small to read, and 63 percent say if they weren’t already aware of the label, they wouldn’t know to look for it. Bottom line: One in five Americans are diligently working to discard a brand’s packaging properly, and the How2Recycle label makes it easier for them to do it right. Thus, they think that brands should be promoting the label, making it easier to see on packaging, AND that companies need to make more parts of their packaging actually recyclable. If you represent a consumer-packaged goods (CPG) brand, you have a vested interest in encouraging better recycling behaviors. As we note in our report, people want the recycling system to work (76 percent of us say recycling makes us feel better about our purchases). They feel like it’s a promise that’s been made to them by CPG companies: “You don’t have to feel guilty about all the buying of stuff you do … just recycle it when you’re done, and it will become something else for somebody else! It’s the circle of life! You’re doing your part!” Once that promise begins to fall apart, most Americans won’t blame themselves — they’ll blame the companies who made the promise. So, let’s make it work. Let’s create a massive campaign encouraging people to look for the How2Recycle label so that recyclable items actually get in the recycling bin and non-recyclable items go in the trash. Brands, use that label as an internal pressure point to design packaging that’s actually recyclable. It’ll be great for your brand. Who’s with me? Pull Quote One in five Americans are diligently working to discard a brand’s packaging properly. Topics Marketing & Communication Consumer Trends Recycling Collective Insight Speaking Sustainably Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) On Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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The How2Recycle label needs a massive campaign. Brands should make it happen

What you need to know about CBD products

March 4, 2020 by  
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As 2020 gets underway, the deluge of CBD products continues. Suddenly, CBD oil is everywhere: from CBD skincare to lattes to CBD-laced treats for Fido and Fluffy’s aging joints. But is the craze legitimate or is it all hype? We’ve delved into recent studies to get the facts on the current state of CBD products. What is CBD? Cannabis plants produce over 100 different chemicals called cannabinoids. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), responsible for the high people get when smoking marijuana, is the most abundant and the most famous. Cannabidiol, or CBD, is the second most abundant chemical in cannabis plants. Unlike THC, it doesn’t cause psychoactive intoxication. Most people won’t feel altered after ingesting CBD, but about 5% of people could be exceptions to this. Human bodies naturally produce cannabinoids that are involved in pain sensation, mood,  sleep , appetite and other bodily functions. CBD may interact with — and amplify — the effects of these cannabinoids already in the body. People ingest CBD products by smoking, vaping, eating gummies, taking pills, applying patches and creams, and placing tinctures under their tongues. Facts about CBD In 2018, Congress passed a law legalizing hemp in all 50 states and removing CBD from the controlled substance list. The idea was to allow manufacturers to use  hemp  to make textiles, concrete, paper and other products. The CBD boom was a side effect. But do CBD products work? While users provide anecdotal evidence, researchers aren’t so sure. “The main problem is that not enough medical studies have been done to offer any kind of clear guidance,” Dr. Jordan Tishler, instructor of medicine at  Harvard Medical School and president of the Association of Cannabis Specialists, said on the Harvard Medical School website. He attributes some CBD success stories to a placebo effect. Along with the efficacy question, lack of oversight in CBD products is a problem. “Right now, there is no way to know for certain whether a product contains any CBD at all, or is safe from contamination ,” says Tishler. “Worse, we’ve found that some companies have even added other medications to CBD products, like opioids and benzodiazepines.” The Food and Drug Administration ( FDA ) is still figuring out how to regulate CBD products. While CBD supplements can’t legally be marketed with specific therapeutic or medical claims, tricky manufacturers are using vague terms like “joint health” or “calm” or “relax” to suggest unproven product benefits. “Until the FDA finalizes how it will regulate CBD, it’s not cracking down on many false claims or overseeing how products are made,” says Tishler. “This means companies can put out all kinds of CBD products with zero accountability.” Some doctors are hopeful about proving the benefits of CBD products. As  Health   reports, “CBD might be worth trying to manage symptoms of anxiety.” Dr. Junella Chin, an osteopathic physician and a medical cannabis expert for cannabisMD, added, “[CBD] tells your body to calm down and reminds you that you’re safe. It mellows out the nervous system so you’re not in a heightened ‘fight or flight’ response.” However, Chin emphasized that CBD isn’t a cure-all. So far, the FDA has only approved one CBD product, a prescription drug to treat certain types of epilepsy. The FDA warns consumers about the potential of harming themselves with CBD products, citing liver injury and  drug  interactions as top concerns. Consumers might not connect subtler side effects with CBD use, such as drowsiness, irritability and gastrointestinal distress. The FDA also emphasizes that the long-term effects of CBD products are unknown, as are the effects on developing teen brains, fetuses, breastfed infants and male reproduction. Most popular CBD products Some of the most popular CBD products include topical creams, CBD bath bombs, CBD skincare and CBD pet products, such as tinctures and calming chews. But how do you assess the onslaught of items made with CBD oil? None of these have so far been subject to FDA evaluation. And, despite what promises they make on their labels, CBD products are not a substitute for  medical  diagnosis and care. When you look at a CBD product, note the label. All dietary supplements should have back panels including an FDA disclaimer and a warning section. “Ideally, it would be preferable to have access to their third-party lab testing results too,” Brandon Beatty, an executive vice president of the U.S. Hemp Roundtable, said in an interview with  Health.  Third-party testing confirms that the label is accurate. For example, a 2017 study by the  Journal of the American Medical Association  found that 26% of the 84 CBD products tested contained lower doses than the label stated. You can check the brand’s website if you don’t see that info on the label. You’ll also want to read the label carefully for dosing instructions and to determine whether the CBD is isolate or full-spectrum. The latter means the  product may contain additional cannabinoids, which are sometimes more effective — and consequently may require a smaller dose. Responsible manufacturers of CBD products should also include a batch number on the  packaging . “This is a huge indicator as to whether they are following good manufacturing practices,” said Beatty. “There should be a way to identify this product in case it was improperly made so the company can carry out a recall.” + Harvard Medical School Via FDA and Health Images via Shutterstock and Pixabay

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What you need to know about CBD products

Climate Neutral Certification labels products with minimized carbon footprints

December 13, 2019 by  
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The idea of the Climate Neutral Certification is a simple one — give businesses the opportunity to identify their carbon emissions and then reduce them and pay for programs that offset them. Climate Neutral, an independent, nonprofit organization, monitors the entire process and provides a unique certification for companies that meet all four criteria. The certification can then be displayed on products and/or their packages, making it simple for consumers to support brands that practice corporate responsibility for the planet. The proposed Climate Neutral Certification consists of four elements that businesses need to meet in order to earn the esteemed Climate Neutral label. Measure Measuring a total carbon footprint involves evaluating every step in the manufacturing process, including material production, power and water requirements, packaging, shipping and more. Climate Neutral helps businesses measure their carbon footprint to meet a uniform standard. Related: PaperTale app shows the ethics and sustainability of clothing with a simple scan Reduce With a carbon footprint number in hand, businesses are then challenged to reduce it. That process might include reducing packaging, using more earth-friendly materials, finding less impactful shipping methods or powering manufacturing processes with solar energy . Offset At this stage, the emissions that cannot be reduced or eliminated must be offset. That means these companies pay other companies to remove carbon from the air or keep it from getting there in the first place (like by planting trees or investing in wind turbines .) Carbon Neutral monitors the payment of these offsets and ensures they are invested in verifiable carbon offset projects. Label Once a company completes the first three steps, it earns the Climate Neutral Certification and can display the label proudly on its products. Benefits of the certification This entire process has advantages for everyone involved. First of all, it empowers businesses to be transparent about their manufacturing processes, material sourcing and consumption. Plus, a company’s investment to reduce carbon emissions is also an investment in a loyal customer base. The certification also a powerful tool for consumers who want to be more conscientious about their purchases but don’t always have the information they need to make good purchasing decisions. Simply look for the label. Thirdly, and perhaps the most obvious, is that the Climate Neutral Certification is good for the environment, because it supports organizations working directly toward carbon reductions and makes it more accessible for consumers to choose eco-friendly products. At least 50 brands have already signed up and earned the certification, and Climate Neutral would like to expand that number into the thousands as soon as possible. To support the effort, it has launched a now fully funded Kickstarter campaign (ends December 12, 2019). + Climate Neutral Images via Climate Neutral

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Climate Neutral Certification labels products with minimized carbon footprints

Recycling Mystery: Label Backing Sheets

May 18, 2018 by  
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You might know that stickers don’t belong in the recycling … The post Recycling Mystery: Label Backing Sheets appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Recycling Mystery: Label Backing Sheets

Why B Corporations are at a crossroads

April 19, 2017 by  
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If the movement is to achieve its bold vision — “that one day all companies compete not only to be the best in the world, but the best for the world” — then more publicly- traded, mainstream companies must commit to the label.

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Why B Corporations are at a crossroads

New Food Label Expires Along With Food, Could Save Tons of Food Waste

November 4, 2014 by  
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If you follow the expiry dates on your food, you could be throwing out almost 40 percent of what you buy each month – the average person throws out a shocking total of 20 pounds of expired food each month. However according to Grist , food date labels that say things like ‘best-before,’ or ‘enjoy by’ are just guidelines from the growers or manufacturers that say when their food will remain at its best – it’s often fine for eating days or weeks past the date marked on the label. Bump Mark is a new food label that could change all that. Read the rest of New Food Label Expires Along With Food, Could Save Tons of Food Waste Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: award , bump , bump mark , dyson , dyson awards , food , food waste , label , labeling food , mark , packaging , Waste

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New Food Label Expires Along With Food, Could Save Tons of Food Waste

INFOGRAPHIC: Demystifying “Natural” and “Organic” Labels on Personal Care Products

June 23, 2014 by  
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When you go grocery shopping, chances are that you notice that most (if not all) produce items have labels on them to signify whether they’re organic or not. Well, just like food, personal care products have a variety of different labels that get slapped onto them as well. These labels are meant to inform customers about the fabulousness within said products, but certain terms are often used to obfuscate, rather than clarify. A blanket term such as “ botanical ” may just mean that a tiny percentage of the ingredients are plant-based, while “natural” can imply that one of the additives came from nature once upon a time… regardless of how much it was altered before being used in that face scrub you’re holding. This label cheat sheet should help you to navigate your way through the local health food store’s beauty product aisle so you can find just what it is you’re looking for, and feel good about using it. Via You Beauty The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: beauty , beauty products , Botanical , bunny free , bunny label , cheat sheet , cruelty free , label , label cheat sheet , labeling , labels , natural , natural label , Organic , organic body care , organic label , personal care , personal care products , shampoo , vegan

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INFOGRAPHIC: Demystifying “Natural” and “Organic” Labels on Personal Care Products

Michael Jantzen Designs Solar-Powered Global Climate Change Pavilion

June 23, 2014 by  
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Prolific designer Michael Jantzen completed a conceptual proposal that uses engaging design to spur greater global climate change debate and education. Titled the Global Climate Change Pavilion, this large public structure houses research and interactive exhibits that explore the relationship between the earth and its rapidly warming climate. Wave-shaped canopies topped by solar panels surround the globular pavilion and provide shade and shelter. The solar-powered exhibition dome is made of self-cleaning photocatalytic concrete and is also designed with rainwater collection and reuse systems. + Michael Jantzen The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Climate Change , climate change pavilion , global climate change pavilion , michael jantzen , photocatalytic concrete , rainwater collection , rainwater reuse , reader submitted content , solar panel canopy , solar panels , Solar Power

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Michael Jantzen Designs Solar-Powered Global Climate Change Pavilion

World’s First Glow-in-the-Dark Road Promises a Brighter, More Energy-Efficient Future

June 23, 2014 by  
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<A HREF=”http://ad.doubleclick.net/jump/N3643.145749.INHABITAT/B8123027.108787687;sz=1×1;ord=[timestamp]?”><br /> <IMG SRC=”http://ad.doubleclick.net/ad/N3643.145749.INHABITAT/B8123027.108787687;sz=1×1;ord=[timestamp]?” BORDER=0 WIDTH=1 HEIGHT=1 ALT=”Advertisement”></A><br /> Read the rest of World’s First Glow-in-the-Dark Road Promises a Brighter, More Energy-Efficient Future Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Alexander Krichevsky , alternative lighting sources , avatar plant , bioglow , biomimicry , Daan Roosegaarde , glow , glow in the dark lighting , glow in the dark paint , glow in the dark plants , Glow in the dark street marking , Glow-in-the-dark , glow-in-the-dark road , glowing , glowing lines , glowing lines 2.0 , glowing road , heijmans , luminescent , smart highway , world’s first glow in the dark road

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World’s First Glow-in-the-Dark Road Promises a Brighter, More Energy-Efficient Future

Green Label Guide: The How2Recycle Label

January 3, 2014 by  
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To help clear up confusion about recycling, the Sustainable Packaging Coalition developed its How2Recycle Label, a straightforward label that gives consumers detailed information about the packaging materials and their proper disposal.

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Green Label Guide: The How2Recycle Label

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