Giant, abstract trees hold up the roof of an experimental Korean home

November 21, 2019 by  
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When designing the House of Three Trees, Seoul-based architecture practice Jae Kim Architects & Researchers (JK-AR) started with a question: What would Korean architecture look like if timber remained the dominant construction material from ancient times until today? To answer this alternate-reality proposition, the architects conceived a project representative of “the rebirth of East Asian timber architecture of the 21st century” that blends digital design and fabrication with traditional Korean architecture. Built with sculptural, tree-like structures that employ the iconic wooden bracket systems of ancient times, the experimental home also relates to the local vernacular with low-cost materials commonly used in rural Korean buildings. During the late Joseon Dynasty of Korea in the 17th and 19th centuries, timber resources were mostly exhausted until globalization led to the import of cheaper wooden materials from around the world. Due to the popularization of reinforced concrete structures and the high cost of timber construction, development of timber architecture slowed. Using algorithmic tools, JK-AR envisions how timber architecture could have evolved had timber resources continued to be readily available with The House of Three Trees. The experimental home features tree-like supporting structures solely composed of wooden joinery — using more than 4,000 timber elements — constructed with traditional techniques and zero additive fasteners. Related: Moon Hoon’s funky new home captures sunlight on Jeju Island “The house criticizes today’s application of traditional buildings that is superficial, merely imitating traditional expressions in architecture, or too abstract,” the architects explained. “Rather, the house redefines the virtue of East Asian timber buildings in its tectonic aspect which is a combination of structure and ornamentation. Moreover, the house serves as an example of how contemporary technology, such as design computation and digital fabrication, can reinterpret traditional architecture. Technology can give East Asian timber construction the potential to evolve in a new direction.” The home takes on a hexagonal shape, influenced by the irregular building plot, with an interior defined by three tree-like columns that support the roof. Covered in asphalt shingles, the butterfly roof is raised to provide a glimpse of the trees inside. Polycarbonate corrugated panels wrap around the home in a nod to rural Korean construction; these panels also create a double-skin around the plywood facade to improve the building’s insulation performance and water resistance. + Jae Kim Architects & Researchers Photography by Roh Kyung via Jae Kim Architects & Researchers

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Giant, abstract trees hold up the roof of an experimental Korean home

South Korean production facility makes medicine out of dandelions

September 30, 2016 by  
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The Korean Dandelion Farm is located on the edge of a forest in Chungcheongbuk-do province in South Korea . It comprises a quiet retreat and a production facility for making remedies using dandelions, which have been used in traditional South Korean medicine for a long time. This wildflower, which can treat liver failure, kidney disease, fever and stomach ache, is grown in a designated area behind the building. Related: Korea’s platform_monsant cafe reflects its stunning volcanic surroundings The property is dominated by concrete and wood. Enclosed areas are made of concrete, while the open spaces are framed by wooden fences. Some parts of the building feature concrete elements cast against wooden boards. The contrast between dark and light areas is accentuated by the different treatment of closed and open spaces. A large pivoting wooden door leads to the cafe area through an open courtyard . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-PNDby5D6s Related: OBBA built this affordable 538-square-feet daylit house in Seoul for a newlywed couple and their cats “Experience of dark and light triggers your emotional experiences in this space,” said the architects. “When you enter the front courtyard, you can see the forest valley through the wide open farm cafe,” they added. + Archihood WXY Via Dezeen Photos and video by Woohyun Kang

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South Korean production facility makes medicine out of dandelions

Korean researchers develop most efficient solar cell to date

January 13, 2015 by  
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A Korean research team has achieved record level efficiency in solar cells, using a new formula for mixing perovskite structures. Perovskite is an inexpensive, abundant mineral, and the researchers have found ways to make it even more efficient for solar power applications. The new solar cells are measured at 17.9 percent efficiency, which could mean very big things for this clean alternative energy source. Read the rest of Korean researchers develop most efficient solar cell to date Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , advancements , alternative energy , Alternative Fuel , best , cheap energy , cheap solar , clean , cleanest , efficiency , korea , Korean , minerals , perovskite , power , records , renewable energy , research , science , scientific , solar , Solar cells , Solar Power , solar technology

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Korean researchers develop most efficient solar cell to date

Horned Rock it Suda Theme Park Hotel Revitalizes an Old Mining Town in South Korea

April 15, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Horned Rock it Suda Theme Park Hotel Revitalizes an Old Mining Town in South Korea Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: absurd , Design , fantasy , horned hotel , Korean pension , living architecture , mining town , Moon Hoon , pension , regenerative design , Rock it Suda , south korea , sustainable design , theater , themed hotel        

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Horned Rock it Suda Theme Park Hotel Revitalizes an Old Mining Town in South Korea

“Small Leak” at Fukushima Daiichi Raises Yet More Safety Concerns

April 15, 2013 by  
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Efforts to repair damage to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear plant in Japan suffered another setback on Sunday when workers found a small leak in pipes from the facility’s cooling pools. Last month the cooling systems failed at the plant, after it was believed that a rat had chewed through electric cables housed in a temporary facility. On April 5, work to set in place anti-rodent measures knocked the cooling systems back offline before a 32,000 gallon leak was discovered in a cooling pool just a day later . This latest leak has further delayed repair work. Read the rest of “Small Leak” at Fukushima Daiichi Raises Yet More Safety Concerns Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Fukushima , Fukushima Accident , fukushima cooling , fukushima daiichi , fukushima leak , fukushima rat , japan earthquake , japan energy , nuclear accident , nuclear power , radioactive , TEPCO , tokyo electric power company        

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“Small Leak” at Fukushima Daiichi Raises Yet More Safety Concerns

Lee Jae-Hyo Turns Ordinary Pieces of Wood Into Giant Sculptural Spheres

November 13, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Lee Jae-Hyo Turns Ordinary Pieces of Wood Into Giant Sculptural Spheres Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “natural materials” , Art , eco design , eco-art , giant wooden balls , green materials , Korean artist , Lee Jae-Hyo , sculptural wooden spheres , timber , Wood

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Lee Jae-Hyo Turns Ordinary Pieces of Wood Into Giant Sculptural Spheres

La Grange de Mon Père is a Delightful Extension to a Tiny Farm House in France

November 13, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of La Grange de Mon Père is a Delightful Extension to a Tiny Farm House in France Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agriculture , eco design , farm house , france , green design , green renovation , La Grange de Mon Père , marseille , MJ Architectes , sustainable design , timber , tiny house

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La Grange de Mon Père is a Delightful Extension to a Tiny Farm House in France

Seung-Yong Song’s Striking Dami Collection Takes Inspiration from Traditional Design

June 12, 2012 by  
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Inspired by traditional basket-woven forms, the Dami Collection , designed by Korea’s  Seung-Yong Song , uses a CNC processing technique to create its striking shapes. The ‘Dami’ takes its name after the Korean verb meaning ‘to put in’, and the cool designs use a new,  eco-friendly material called  Valchromat to keep production sustainable. Read the rest of Seung-Yong Song’s Striking Dami Collection Takes Inspiration from Traditional Design Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Basket Furniture , CNC Technique , Dami Collection , eco-friendly material , Korean Design , Korean Grill , Seung Yong Song , Valchromat

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Seung-Yong Song’s Striking Dami Collection Takes Inspiration from Traditional Design

Folding Stealth Desklamp Illuminates Your Computer Keyboard with a Row of LEDs

June 12, 2012 by  
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With the shift from paper to digital media, our desks don’t need as much light as they did once before. With this in mind, Belgian designer Tim Baute, from Interror.be, created a flatpack lamp with a row of  LED lights that gently illuminate your keyboard and the surrounding space. Energy-efficient, compact, easy to transport, and elegant, the Stealth Desklamp was carefully designed to respect resources and materials. Read the rest of Folding Stealth Desklamp Illuminates Your Computer Keyboard with a Row of LEDs Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , computer light , DMY Berlin 2012 , Flatpack , green lighting , green products , Interror.be , LED , powdercoated steel , Sculptural light , Stealth Desklamp

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Folding Stealth Desklamp Illuminates Your Computer Keyboard with a Row of LEDs

Hyundai Draws Up Plans for New $150M Green Headquarters in US

January 6, 2012 by  
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The Korean automaker's US operations are working with the Gensler architectural firm on a design for a new headquarters complex that's to be built to LEED-Gold standards in Southern California.

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Hyundai Draws Up Plans for New $150M Green Headquarters in US

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