Cooking inspiration from vegan recipes all over the world

October 1, 2021 by  
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Nearly every healthy diet on the planet points towards a heavy emphasis on plant-based whole foods. Whether that means adopting a vegetarian lifestyle, making one meatless meal each week, or taking away all animal products in favor of vegan eating, every step is a step towards a healthier body and planet.  If you’ve decided to explore the world of vegan eating, looking globally gives you a vast array of flavors to explore above and beyond those you may have been exposed to in your regional area. While some ingredients may be difficult to source, others are readily available if you know where to look. Check out the international section of your supermarket, stop into the specialty food store, or look online for spices and other foods you may not already have in the pantry.  Related: Easy and unexpected radish recipes Italy When you think of Italy, you likely think of pasta, but it’s a country full of culinary surprises where you’ll find plenty of tomatoes along with onions, garlic and peppers. Italians love to flavor with fresh or dried herbs, and of course, don’t forget the olive oil. Bean and lentils are another large part of the equation. Try all these flavors in this  Quick Italian White Bean Soup  from the Blue Zones Meal Planner.   Okinawa, Japan The Okinawan diet benefits from its location as a trading post for hundreds of years. The influences run deep from around the world. In addition, the archipelago is part of Japan and has picked up much of the culture since its annexation in 1879, yet remains an ‘island’ of unique tropical fruits and vegetables rare to other places. It’s worth noting that Okinawans maintain one of the longest lifespans of anywhere on the planet, so they must be doing something right.  To experience Okinawan cuisine, one must start with the base of most meals, dashi. Dashi is a seaweed broth used as a flavor boost and nutritious additive. Explore the umami flavor of kelp in this  Authentic Miso Soup  from Allrecipes, or get creative with these  Simmered Vegetables  from Recipe Tin Japan. Greece The colors and vibrant culture of Greece come to life in the food. Although much of the country incorporates seafood from the nearby ocean, plant-based eating is well established, wholesome and delicious. Consider this  Greek Bruschetta  from The New York Times or dig into  this version  from The Speckled Palate. Another cornerstone of Greek cooking comes in the form of chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans. The beans create a basis for a variety of dishes from simply roasting them with some seasoning, to soups,  a salad topping  (substitute the goat cheese in this recipe), and of course, the ubiquitous  hummus .  Try this family favorite from our home: Roasted Garbanzo Beans 1 can garbanzo beans (chickpeas) 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 teaspoon agave 2 teaspoons lemon juice 3 garlic cloves 1 teaspoon paprika A dusting of garlic powder and a dash of cayenne Simply mix all the ingredients together. Spread the beans out in a pan and roast at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for about 30 minutes, stirring once or twice to coat. Yum! Africa If you’re really looking to break out of the “What’s for Dinner?” rut, look into African cuisine. You can start with this compilation of recipes from  Eluxe Magazine . Africa is another region with a rich history that has influenced food. The sheer size of the region, with varying climates, growing conditions and cultures, adds to the complexity of ingredients. These ingredients include greens, okra, rice , plantains, beans and flavor-boosting spices like turmeric and cardamom. Perhaps the most quintessential African dish is peanut stew. Try  this version  from AfroVitalityEats. Mexico Mexico offers a plethora of spices and flavor combinations unmatched in other areas of the planet. Beans , rice, peppers, corn, lime, avocado and root vegetables are mainstream components of the recipe profile so it’s pretty easy to dish up a vegan meal. Take, for example, ceviche, an adaptive dish for many parts of the world. Where some countries include fish or shrimp, others give it a local flair. Try this  Mexican Ceviche  for a vegan option with all the flavors of Mexico. Many other Mexican dishes can easily be tweaked for vegans, such as these  tamales ,  Chiles En Nogadas , and  Pozole . India Curry comes to mind, and it should since it is a linchpin of Indian cuisine. But you’ll also find a host of spices like turmeric, cardamom, cumin, mustard seed, tamarind and fennel, to name a few. India might have the deepest relationship with spices of anywhere in the world, which makes it a great place to find culinary inspiration.  Even with all those spicy options, the place to start might be with naan. After all, you need something to balance out the flavors. Here’s one  naan  option from Rainbow Plant Life. You might also want to try this  dosa  recipe. Pair these breads with some  Vegan Chickpea Curry  or the more subtle  Pea Pulao with Lemon . Wherever in the world your vegan culinary exploits take you, remember to be adventurous in your travels, even if you don’t leave the kitchen.  Images via Pexels and Pixabay 

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Cooking inspiration from vegan recipes all over the world

Hawaii’s Klauea Volcano erupts, creates lake of lava

October 1, 2021 by  
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On Wednesday, one of the most active volcanoes on Earth erupted. The U.S. Geological Survey has confirmed that the K?lauea volcano in Hawaii has formed a sizeable lake of lava. The lava has been captured on video flowing into the former Halema’uma’u Crater. The U.S. National Park Service and U.S. Geological Survey have captured striking images and videos of the occurrence. The good news is that the eruption did not take place in an inhabited area. Related: Critically endangered bird found alive in Hawaii Since Wednesday, the U.S. Geological Survey has been sending out alerts, warning several entities of the possible danger caused by the eruption. The aviation code also changed to red, and officials warned of increased earthquake possibilities. Ground swelling had been detected at the time, prompting more warnings. The recent eruption is not a new phenomenon for K?lauea. The volcano had a major eruption in 2018, leading to the destruction of more than 700 homes. In the eruptions, thousands of people were evicted. Even before 2018, the volcano was slowly erupting over the decades. Since 1983, the volcano has occasionally erupted and caused streams of lava to cover rural farms. The 2018 eruption saw the lava spill cover an area half the size of Manhattan and up to 80 feet tall. The area that erupted on Wednesday also erupted in December. The December eruption saw lava flow continue until May this year. Although the flow ended in May, experts had predicted that the volcano would erupt again. Officials at the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park are monitoring the situation while providing feedback to the public for safety reasons. They continually update the status of the eruption through official communication channels. Park spokesperson Jessica Ferracane told the Associated Press that her colleagues were monitoring the situation. At the time of reporting, she had not arrived at the park though. “He saw that from Volcano House, which is at least two miles away from the eruption site, so I suspect … we’ll be able to see a pretty glow, and who knows what else,” Ferracane said. Via Gizmodo and The Guardian Lead image via USGS

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Renzo Piano-inspired Skyhouse nestles into Hollywood Hills

September 16, 2021 by  
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Inspired by Renzo Piano’s Fondation Beyeler museum in Switzerland, Skyhouse by XTEN Architecture is a multi-award-winning home in the Hollywood Hills. The 12,000-square-foot house consists of five bedrooms and seven bathrooms with amenities including an infinity pool, home gym, theater and eight-car garage. Located on a cul-de-sac in the Bird Streets of Los Angeles , the site has a 15-foot difference in elevation. The house is nestled into the hillside, maximizing the thermal qualities of the earth. The property also incorporates endemic drought-resistant plants, which are irrigated via stormwater collection tanks. Related : Luxury timber home mimics a rocky outcropping for minimal site impact The project’s walls juxtapose with the seemingly weightless grid of truncated skylights that float above. This concept stems from the Beyeler Museum, which adopts a full ceiling of skylights to filter sunlight into the galleries. Skyhouse’s ceiling grid is inspired by the urban fabric of L.A. and produces a soft, diffused quality of light that floods the interiors. The skylights are tinted and contain a diffuse PVC membrane to reduce solar intake, keeping the temperatures comfortable while minimizing artificial daylighting. Four solid volumes form the private bedroom suites, while the area between them creates the shared living spaces, including the kitchen, dining and family area. This living area extends from the center of the house and opens fully to a terrace and infinity pool overlooking the landscape. Passive cooling and cross ventilation are optimized through the floor-to-ceiling glass pocket doors that slide away. These create a blur between the interiors and exteriors, which is reinforced through the white terrazzo that spans from the indoors to the terrace. Due to the combination of an elegant minimalist aesthetic and passive design, XTEN has been awarded several awards for this luxurious project. These awards include the Residential Awards’ “Large Single Family Merit Winner,” an American Architecture Award (AAA) by Chicago Athenaeum, and the “Design Awards Residential Merit,” by the American Institute of Architects’ L.A. chapter. + XTEN Architecture Photography by Steve King

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Renzo Piano-inspired Skyhouse nestles into Hollywood Hills

Explore Minetta Lane, a green townhouse with a climbing wall

September 16, 2021 by  
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Kushner Studios has completed a major renovation of a century-old townhouse in Minetta Lane, Greenwich Village. Glorious expansive living spaces look out onto New York’s skyline through a woven steel and foliage facade. The towering home even has its own  climbing wall! With over 4,800 square feet of interior space and 1,200 square feet of outdoor and roof space, this extensive home at Minetta Lane in Manhattan offers five bedrooms, multiple living spaces, four bathrooms, a jacuzzi, and a gym. Its 83-foot tall rock climbing wall is the tallest east of Reno, Nevada. Related: Extraordinary treehouse is a climber’s dream with its own indoor climbing wall Kushner Studios took on the $2.7 million renovation intending to leave the historical shell intact and create a new interior and vertical extension. The original streetscape was preserved. “The crossing tree limbs forming Gothic archways fronting the Minetta Street, inspired the defining narrative structure played out in the building’s newly inserted facade. The playful steel facade is covered in Ivy adding a green wall terminus to the street as an homage to the past and a vision of public good will,” a project statement explains. Interior designer Robert Isabell previously owned the townhouse and created as much streetside greenery as possible, lending the building its name as the Salad House. Evoking rural landscapes, the huge stacked chord woodpile in the triple-height living room has been harvested by hand from the owner’s property upstate and can keep the inhabitants warm via a total of nine woodburning fireplaces. This alternative heat source is in addition to the incorporation of solar panels.  Natural finishes and materials are abundant throughout the five-story home, from the floorings in wood and rope to the rustic stairs and built-in storage in naturally varied timbers . The home’s smaller service areas work to serve the adjacent larger served spaces. The bedrooms, for example, have secondary work or office spaces alongside them. A mid-level convertible open space demarcates the original home from the additional floors added.  The roof features cooking and entertaining space plus thrilling views of the city. The rock climbing wall is situated in the rear courtyard and provides a surreal urban sports experience.  Construction took a total of seven years, from May 2012 to January 2020. + Kushner Studios Images via Kushner Studios

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Copper-clad Bondi House highlights compact, multi-level living

August 24, 2021 by  
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Armed with a thoughtful combination of natural light, garden outlooks and angled design, this copper-clad townhouse in Australia manages to achieve compact, multi-level living with a deep sense of  privacy  — despite its location on an exposed corner site. The Bondi House, named for the beachy suburb where it’s located in eastern Sydney, comes from Fox Johnston Architects and has already been shortlisted for the 2021 Australian Interior Design Awards, Houses Awards and the AIA NSW Architecture Awards. The home itself spans an impressive 212 square meters on a 153 square meter site, while still leaving room for  landscape  spaces for the owners to cultivate. The small space doesn’t infringe upon the neighbors either, instead using its setback and deep balcony to offer up additional space along the public walkway and light to the homes on the northwest side. Related: A sustainable, zinc-clad family home on a budget in Australia The living room uses concrete floors paired with exposed timber beams, as well as windows and doors crafted from western red cedar. The architects also chose local Sydney sandstone for the office plinth and dark stone for the kitchen benchtops. Natural light and organic tones cover the entire interior, culminating in a central  courtyard  that separates the kitchen from the living room, accented with curved windows. The office sits where the car space once stood, though the area could easily be refitted into a parking space if the owners ever choose to sell the property.  “The central courtyard was an early idea we developed to gather light and segment the living level into zones, which we think is more interesting in a small space, rather than that feeling of just being in one long room,” said Conrad Johnston, Director at Fox Johnston. “The copper wall is big gesture for the setting and the street. Next to a traditional semi we’ve attached this bold, curved copper wall on a tiny block. This sculptural element crowns and connects the entire site. It’s a bit full on but in a gentle way.” Copper lasts long and doesn’t easily degrade or corrode, making it immune to most environmental elements or hazards. Plus, it is completely  recyclable  at the end of its life.  Other sustainable features to the home include locally sourced construction materials, low VOC diminishes, 4 Green Start fittings and fixtures, native landscaping to reduce water usage and a 3,000-liter  rainwater  tank for irrigation. + Fox Johnston Via ArchDaily Images courtesy of Brett Boardman

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Copper-clad Bondi House highlights compact, multi-level living

Explore the Saltbox Passive House’s sweet sustainable design

August 20, 2021 by  
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The Saltbox Passive House is located in Bromont, Quebec , and is a residence for a family of four. The 3100-square-foot home sits in a meadow at the edge of a 2.5-acre wooded plot. Its design combines elements of the local context with energy-efficient strategies to enhance sustainability while maintaining a modern aesthetic. Through the efforts of the architects from Atelier l’Abri, the contractor Construction Rocket and consultants from the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS), the building has obtained LEED Platinum and PHIUS 2018+ certifications, making it the third certified passive house in Quebec. The architects employed an L-shaped plan with two different roof slopes that mirror the topography of the landscape. The name of the house stems from the architectural language of saltbox buildings, a form of vernacular architecture from New England . The primary characteristic of saltbox houses is a gable roof over the main section of the building with a single-pitch roof over the lower section, making them easy to identify at first glance. Related: Passive House-certified residence frames ski resort views in Utah The Saltbox Passive House comprises three levels, of which the bottom two are tucked into the mountain along the rear retaining wall. The basement level serves as a workshop and houses a garage. The ground level includes shared spaces for the family. This includes living and dining spaces, which are organized around a double-height volume encompassing the kitchen, pantry, mudroom and powder room. This volume extends to the top level and is adjacent to the passageway that leads to the private spaces, including the three bedrooms and a home office. Throughout the design process, the architects collaborated with consultants to ensure that the project met Passivhaus Institut standards. Established in the early 1980s in Germany, the institute promotes buildings that consider occupant comfort while maintaining high levels of energy efficiency. This is often achieved through the use of well-insulated interiors, extensive heat recovery from mechanical ventilation systems and conscious design of openings for thermal comfort. Several design choices were made to ensure high performance without compromising comfort and aesthetics. The house incorporates south-facing, triple-glazed UPVC openings to capture sunlight and frame views of the lush landscape while serving as a means of passive solar heating. Close attention to materiality has further reduced the building’s carbon footprint. Cellulose insulation, excavated stone for the retaining wall and cedar cladding are all readily available in the region and aid in keeping the house thermally insulated. Though the building is connected to public electricity systems and utilities, its enhanced environmentally friendly measures reduce dependence on these facilities. + L’Abri Photography by Raphaël Thibodeau

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Explore the Saltbox Passive House’s sweet sustainable design

400-year-old baroque restaurant Three Roses receives a sensitive facelift

July 19, 2021 by  
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This monastery-turned- restaurant has given architectural planners 400 years of layers to reveal — and celebrate. The gradual unveiling is being handled by ADR architectural studio with a mission to respect the original architecture in the process. Known as the Broumov Monastery, the building originated in the era of baroque architecture. Rather than demolishing the masterpiece in favor of modernization, the design team is painstakingly refurbishing one section at a time. This is in conjunction with a variety of other projects the studio has tackled in the complex, including the Café Dietzenhofer, revitalization of the R?žový dv?r (The Rose Yard), a new visitor center and the U T?í r?ží (Three Roses) restaurant in the south wing. Related: Eco-friendly spiritual living at Holy Wisdom Monastery Over the centuries, the monastery has seen many uses and suffered a period of neglect and disrepair. The current investor asked the team to renovate the space while staying true to the original footprint, which didn’t exactly match modern needs. The resulting Three Roses Restaurant is a nod to the original pub that served food and drink in the location for the first few hundred years before the decay began, so history was on their side. Still, designers had to reverse inadequate previous attempts at improvements and overcome other obstacles. Working with preservationists, the studio worked meticulously to salvage items with historical relevance and replicate the authentic appeal of the baroque era. Separate yet connected vaults, a kitchen, an event room and indoor and outdoor dining areas are discovered through corridors accented by distinctive archways and terrazzo tile floors made from a local producer. Along the way, every surface that could be salvaged or resurfaced has remained inside the building, including old flooring that became a bar top and layers of paint that were left as-is to reveal the history of the space.  Inside the kitchen, the original tile stove, stone moldings and a number of tiny little windows and doors found in unexpected positions have benefitted from refurbishing, too. Original casement windows and paneled doors were preserved in the spirit of authenticity as well as inspiration for modern conversation. All salvageable, historically relevant items have been refurbished or replicated, and the restaurant is filled with rustic wood tables and wall paneling for a traditional pub vibe. + ADR Studio Photography by BoysPlayNice via ADR Studio

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400-year-old baroque restaurant Three Roses receives a sensitive facelift

An energy-efficient renovation transforms this retro apartment

July 6, 2021 by  
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They say everything old can be new again. This renovation project, dubbed the Campo Alegre Apartment, completely captures that very sentiment. When you see this modern apartment’s beautiful views, lovely flooring and open layout, you won’t believe it’s part of a housing building constructed in the early 1970s. Rather than building brand-new places, many architects are finding creative ways to reuse and repurpose existing structures. This approach is not only practical but sustainable, too. For example, this project reused existing materials to give this apartment in Portugal an energy-efficient makeover. Related: Residential building from the ’60s gets an energy-efficient remodel The renovation also changed the apartment’s entire floor plan, turning five bedrooms into three. This created enough space for a master suite with a big closet and added room to the kitchen. The result is an open and airy design that looks and feels modern while retaining some of the original layout’s retro flair. It’s a true blending of the past, present and future. The apartment is oriented to the east, south and west, providing plenty of natural light and a beautiful view of the river. Several big windows and sliding glass doors help bring the outside world in and make the unit feel spacious. Meanwhile, the wood floor features an eye-catching design. Paired with built-in shelving cubbyholes, this apartment offers a unique look that honors the 1970s while incorporating modern elements and plenty of storage spaces. Tall custom cabinets in the kitchen, a fully tiled bathroom and sleek design elements throughout contribute to the unit’s amazing contemporary look. Created by Costa Lima Arquitectos, this apartment is a beautiful example of how old buildings can become new again, even when they’ve got a design that honors the past. This sustainable renovation project lives up to Costa Lima Arquitectos’s value for designing and building from a place of collective conscience with a focus on economic sustainability and environmental awareness. + Costa Lima Arquitectos Via ArchDaily Photography © Ivo Tavares Studio

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An energy-efficient renovation transforms this retro apartment

An energy-efficient renovation transforms this retro apartment

July 6, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

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They say everything old can be new again. This renovation project, dubbed the Campo Alegre Apartment, completely captures that very sentiment. When you see this modern apartment’s beautiful views, lovely flooring and open layout, you won’t believe it’s part of a housing building constructed in the early 1970s. Rather than building brand-new places, many architects are finding creative ways to reuse and repurpose existing structures. This approach is not only practical but sustainable, too. For example, this project reused existing materials to give this apartment in Portugal an energy-efficient makeover. Related: Residential building from the ’60s gets an energy-efficient remodel The renovation also changed the apartment’s entire floor plan, turning five bedrooms into three. This created enough space for a master suite with a big closet and added room to the kitchen. The result is an open and airy design that looks and feels modern while retaining some of the original layout’s retro flair. It’s a true blending of the past, present and future. The apartment is oriented to the east, south and west, providing plenty of natural light and a beautiful view of the river. Several big windows and sliding glass doors help bring the outside world in and make the unit feel spacious. Meanwhile, the wood floor features an eye-catching design. Paired with built-in shelving cubbyholes, this apartment offers a unique look that honors the 1970s while incorporating modern elements and plenty of storage spaces. Tall custom cabinets in the kitchen, a fully tiled bathroom and sleek design elements throughout contribute to the unit’s amazing contemporary look. Created by Costa Lima Arquitectos, this apartment is a beautiful example of how old buildings can become new again, even when they’ve got a design that honors the past. This sustainable renovation project lives up to Costa Lima Arquitectos’s value for designing and building from a place of collective conscience with a focus on economic sustainability and environmental awareness. + Costa Lima Arquitectos Via ArchDaily Photography © Ivo Tavares Studio

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An energy-efficient renovation transforms this retro apartment

California couple fined $18,000 for destroying Joshua trees

July 6, 2021 by  
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A California-based couple, Jeffrey Walter and Jonetta Nordberg-Walter, face a fine of $18,000 after uprooting 36 Joshua trees to build a new house. The couple was fined after an anonymous neighbor sent a tip to the California Fish and Wildlife Department. The neighbor is said to have witnessed the trees being bulldozed and buried during the construction of the new home. According to California Fish and Wildlife Department officials, the neighbor had warned the Morongo Basin couple about the consequences of bulldozing the trees , but the couple ignored the warning. Joshua trees are protected in California, and anyone found cutting them is likely to be sued.  Related: California votes to protect Joshua trees Nathaniel Arnold, deputy chief of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife law enforcement division, said that protecting the endangered Joshua trees depends on locals who are passionate about the species. “Most California citizens who reside in Joshua Tree habitat revere these iconic desert species, more so now than ever because of its degraded population status,” Arnold said. Arnold commended the work done by the resident who out the tip about the destruction of Joshua trees . He says that such a move could serve as a deterrent to those who wish to destroy the trees. “We’re pleased to see the citizen tip led to a successful disposition and we hope it serves as a deterrent to others who may think it is acceptable to unlawfully remove Joshua trees to make way for development,” Arnold added. California wildlife officials are now considering having Joshua trees protected under the Endangered Species Act. Global warming has made it almost impossible for Joshua trees to thrive. In 2020, California’s Dome wildfire consumed over 43,000 acres of Joshua tree woodland . Based on the  National Park Service  data, this single event led to the destruction of about 1.3 million Joshua trees. There are also many documented incidences where fires or individuals have led to the destruction of Joshua trees. In 2019, Joshua Tree National Park was closed temporarily following increased instances of Joshua tree destruction. Following the latest ruling, Walter and Nordberg-Walter were required by the court to each pay $9,000 for the destroyed trees. However, they can earn credit toward the fine if they volunteer at Joshua Tree National Park or the Mojave Desert Land Trust. Via Washington Post Images via San Bernardino County District Attorney

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