Christophe Caranchini proposes resilient floating houses for Kiribati

October 5, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Christophe Caranchini proposes resilient floating houses for Kiribati

The Republic of Kiribati, a small nation of islands and atolls in the central Pacific Ocean, is a tropical paradise that’s also believed to be at extreme risk of disappearing due to climate change. In response to a global design competition seeking climate-resilient solutions to housing for Kiribati citizens, French architect Christophe Caranchini has proposed prefabricated floating communities that promote off-grid, communal living. In addition to drawing energy from renewable sources, each modular unit would be optimized for energy efficiency and home gardening. Launched in October 2019, the Kiribati Floating Houses competition was hosted by the Young Architects Competition to generate ideas for a resilient Kiribati. Participants were challenged to create a new housing model that would not only adapt to rising ocean levels but would also honor the native culture and way of life.  Related: Guallart Architects unveil winning bid for a self-sufficient community in China Christophe Caranchini’s submission, titled Kiribati 2.0, proposes a series of floating, prefabricated homes that would be arranged in a circle to promote a sense of community and to weather the forces of tropical storms. Inspired by the typology of existing houses in Kiribati, the modular units would be prefabricated from wood in a workshop and then transported by boat to Kiribati. The units would come in a variety of types for flexibility, from floating bases that accommodate either a deck, agriculture or housing to units that allow for public docking (with or without a ladder), private gardens and terraces or private beach access with a terrace.  The floating homes would span two floors, with the first level dedicated to daytime living and workspaces and the upper level reserved for the bedrooms. The roof would be used as a productive space for growing vegetables and collecting renewable energy via wind turbines and solar panels. Rainwater would also be collected from the roof. A filtering garden would treat wastewater onsite before it’s discharged into the sea. The Kiribati Floating Houses competition ended in January 2020 with the first prize awarded to Polish architect Marcin Kitala’s submission. + Christophe Caranchini Images via Christophe Caranchini

Here is the original: 
Christophe Caranchini proposes resilient floating houses for Kiribati

Biggest environmental news stories of the decade

December 31, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Biggest environmental news stories of the decade

As we begin a new decade, we’re taking a look over the biggest environmental news stories since 2010. There’s a little good news, and a lot of not-so-good news. Still, we can look back and learn from what is happening in the hopes of taking action and restoring a brighter future for our planet. Climate change moves into the mainstream, and more kids get involved While a few climate deniers still fill high-ranking political posts, climate change is much more widely accepted as fact — rather than something to “believe in” — than it was in 2010. According to the TED blog, only four TED Talks specifically on climate change were posted in 2010 and 2011, although speakers mentioned the phenomenon. By 2015, TED said, people had shifted to seeing climate change as happening now, rather than in the far-off future, thanks to debates about whether or not places like the island nation of Kiribati were already sinking. Related: 12 good things that happened for the environment in 2019 By the end of the decade, climate change is on the forefront of many people’s minds, especially young people. Worldwide movements like Extinction Rebellion use massive, nonviolent protests to urge politicians to slow the warming. Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg rose to international prominence, taking politicians to task about ignoring climate change and even being named Time Magazine’s person of the year in 2019. Deepwater Horizon The decade started with a tragic oil spill on April 20, 2010, one of the worst in history. The explosion on British Petroleum’s Deepwater Horizon, an oil rig operating in the Gulf of Mexico, killed 11 people. It leaked oil into the gulf for 87 days, for a total of 3.19 million barrels of crude oil polluting the coasts of Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida. Images of people trying to wipe oil off pelican wings filled the news. Cleanup costs reached at least $65 billion . In addition to economic blows, especially to Louisiana’s shrimp and oyster industries, the animal death toll was high. According to the Center for Biological Diversity, about 82,000 birds, 6,165 sea turtles, 25,900 marine mammals and uncountable numbers of fish perished in the spill. Researchers are still gauging the long-term effects. Extreme weather events become more frequent As the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration warned, global warming escalates weather disasters. The last decade saw 111 climate-related natural disasters that each cost more than $1 billion in damage. These include tornadoes, hurricanes, wildfires, floods, drought, heatwaves and winter storms. In 2017, Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, killing 2,981 people and costing an estimated $93.6 billion in damages. Notable U.S. disasters included Hurricane Sandy in 2012 and the Missouri tornadoes of 2011. Animal extinctions Humans continued to edge out other animals in the struggle for habitat and resources. According to the World Wildlife Fund , species loss currently stands at between 1,000 and 10,000 times higher than the natural extinction rate, which is the rate Earth would lose species if humans didn’t exist. In 2012, Lonesome George, the last Pinta tortoise , died at over 100 years old. Formosan clouded leopards no longer slink across Taiwan. The Christmas Island pipistrelle, a microbat, has ceased its ultrasonic squeaking. No more baiji dolphins cavort in the Yangtze River. In this last decade, the planet also lost Caribbean monk seals, West African black rhinos, Madagascar hippopotami and Liverpool pigeons. Rainforest deforestation The decade’s final year witnessed much of the Amazonian rainforest go up in smoke. Brazil and Bolivia were particularly hit hard. Many attributed this tragedy at least in part to Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s push for development over preservation. Horrifying photos from the National Institute for Space Research revealed enormous bald swaths where trees once stood. During its peak in August 2019, more than 70,000 individual fires were burning. The rainforest plays a critical role in regulating the entire world’s climate, so concerns stretched far beyond Brazil. Related: Amazon rainforest might reach irreversible tipping point as early as 2021 Increase in ocean plastic During the last decade, plastic continued to fill the oceans. But awareness of ocean plastic also grew. A 2018 United Nations study reported that people dump approximately 13 million tons of plastic into the world’s oceans annually, and the researchers expected this number to grow. At the same time, many concerned citizens in cities around the world worked to decrease plastic waste by banning straws and plastic bags. Some hotel chains vowed to no longer stock beverages packaged in single-use plastic bottles. Many companies started developing products made from recycled plastic. Reusable water bottles became an important fashion accessory. China stopped buying American recycling Americans became more adept at recycling , but they weren’t necessarily aware where their recycled goods went. In 2018, China enacted a policy called National Sword. Suddenly, Americans realized their old plastic had largely been going to China , but China didn’t want it anymore. Now at the end of the decade, American cities are scrambling to save unprofitable recycling programs. Ironically, some cities have canceled these programs just when they’ve convinced people to recycle. Right now, it’s cheaper for American companies to produce new plastic than to recycle old. This is one of the many environmental problems that must be addressed in the coming decade. Images via Shutterstock

See the rest here:
Biggest environmental news stories of the decade

New Zealand considering special visas for climate refugees

October 31, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New Zealand considering special visas for climate refugees

Impacts of climate change , like rising sea levels , will likely soon force people to abandon their land . Now the new government of New Zealand is considering action. They’re thinking about creating an experimental visa category for people prompted to leave their homes because of climate change. People living on some Pacific islands could be displaced because of sea level rise, and New Zealand might help out. Climate change minister James Shaw recently told Radio New Zealand there could be an “experimental humanitarian visa category” for people from the Pacific, saying, “It is a piece of work that we intend to do in partnership with the Pacific islands.” Related: Five Pacific Ocean islands have already disappeared because of climate change Some people have already applied to be refugees in New Zealand because of climate change – and have been turned away. Radio New Zealand reported , just days before Shaw’s announcement, the cases of two families from the island nation of Tuvalu who had applied to be New Zealand’s first climate refugees , only to be rejected. The tribunal said they didn’t risk persecution due to race, nationality, religion, or membership in a religious or political group under the 1951 refugee convention, according to The Guardian . Alberto Costi, international environmental law expert at Victoria University of Wellington , told The Guardian, “The conditions are pretty strict and really apply to persecution. These people who arrive here hoping to seek asylum on environmental grounds are bound to be sent back to their home countries.” And the Tuvalu families aren’t the only people who have been turned away. Ioane Teitiota of Kiribati applied to be the world’s first climate change refugee in 2014. New Zealand’s supreme court dismissed Teitiota’s case, and he was deported. Costi expressed interest in Shaw’s idea but told The Guardian there would need to be clear guidelines – one issue would be how to legally determine whether or not a climate change refugee was able to still reside in their home country. Via The Guardian Images via Depositphotos and Wikimedia Commons

Original post: 
New Zealand considering special visas for climate refugees

Cyclone Pam tears through South Pacific; Vanuatu reports catastrophic damage, Kiribati flooded

March 16, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Cyclone Pam tears through South Pacific; Vanuatu reports catastrophic damage, Kiribati flooded

Photo © Humans of Vanuatu Cyclone Pam, a 168mph storm which hit the South Pacific Friday and Saturday (March 13-14th), has been described as a ‘worst case scenario’ for the archipelago of Vanuatu. The storm lingered over the region for some 24 hours with the force of a category 5 storm. Vanuatu’s President Baldwin Lonsdale told media that the storm has “wiped out” all recent development and that “everything” will have to be rebuilt, while humanitarian aid is desperately and urgently needed. The low-lying island nation of Kiribati , which has already experienced devastating flooding in recent weeks is also reported to have sustained significant damage. Read the rest of Cyclone Pam tears through South Pacific; Vanuatu reports catastrophic damage, Kiribati flooded Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: aid work , australia , category 5 , cyclone pam , Disaster Relief , flooding , hospitals , housing , humanitarian , New Zealand , port-vila , schools , south pacific , storm , vanuatu

Read more: 
Cyclone Pam tears through South Pacific; Vanuatu reports catastrophic damage, Kiribati flooded

Dubai reveals plans for a high-tech ‘Museum of the Future’

March 16, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Dubai reveals plans for a high-tech ‘Museum of the Future’

Read the rest of Dubai reveals plans for a high-tech ‘Museum of the Future’ Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: dubai , Dubai Architecture , Dubai innovation , Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum , Museum of the Future , Museum of the Future Dubai , Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum , united arab emirates

View post: 
Dubai reveals plans for a high-tech ‘Museum of the Future’

Jochen Specht transformed an old Austrian house into a minimalist modern residence

March 16, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Jochen Specht transformed an old Austrian house into a minimalist modern residence

Read the rest of Jochen Specht transformed an old Austrian house into a minimalist modern residence Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Austria , floor heating , geothermal energy , green facade , green renovation , Jochen Specht , minimalist home , mountain home , renovated house , timber architecture , timber frame

Go here to see the original:
Jochen Specht transformed an old Austrian house into a minimalist modern residence

Kiribati Considered Moving Entire Population to a $2 Billion Man-Made Island

October 19, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Kiribati Considered Moving Entire Population to a $2 Billion Man-Made Island

The small island nation of Kiribati’s highest point is no more than two meters above sea level, which makes it one of the most vulnerable places on Earth to rising water levels. The country is one of the most vocal global advocates for action on climate change, but with the problem of a rising sea lapping at their doorstep, they have considered some pretty drastic measures in recent years, including relocating the entire population of around 100,000. Read the rest of Kiribati Considered Moving Entire Population to a $2 Billion Man-Made Island Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Climate Change , climate change dangers , global warming , global warming dangers , ice melting , is the ocean level rising , island nation , kiribati , kiribati climate change , kiribati global warming , kiribati islands , kiribati rising waters , melting ice caps , republic of kiribati , rising ocean levels , rising water levels , sea level , sea level rising

View post: 
Kiribati Considered Moving Entire Population to a $2 Billion Man-Made Island

INHABITAT INTERVIEW: Water Architect Koen Olthuis on How to Embrace Rising Sea Levels

July 23, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on INHABITAT INTERVIEW: Water Architect Koen Olthuis on How to Embrace Rising Sea Levels

Sea levels are rising , floods are prevalent, and cities are at greater risk than ever due to climate change . Now that we’ve accepted these facts, it’s time to design and build more resilient structures. Koen Olthuis , one of the most forward-thinking and innovative architects out there, has a solution for rising sea levels. His solution: Embrace the water by incorporating it into our cities; creating resilient buildings and infrastructure that can handle extreme flooding, heavy rains, and higher water. Olthuis and his team at Waterstudio.nl have been showing coastal communities the benefits of building on the water. With countries like the Maldives and Kiribati having to build oceanside or move in order to escape rising sea levels, New York learning to battle storm surges, and Jakarta dealing with massive flooding, embracing water may be our only option for survival. We chatted with Olthuis about how coastal cities can become more resilient in the face of change—read on for our interview! Read the rest of INHABITAT INTERVIEW: Water Architect Koen Olthuis on How to Embrace Rising Sea Levels Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , calcutta , city apps , Climate Change , coastal cities , design for disaster , dikes , eco design , extreme flooding , floating architecture , floating buildings , floating cities , floating countries , flood-proof design , flooding , global warming , green architecture , Green Building , green design , holland , inhabitat interview , jakarta , kiribati , Koen Olthius , koen olthuis , koen olthuis interview , Maldives , Miami , New York. , rising sea levels , sea level rise , storm surge , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , Urban design , water issues , Waterstudio , Waterstudio.nl

Read more: 
INHABITAT INTERVIEW: Water Architect Koen Olthuis on How to Embrace Rising Sea Levels

IPCC Report Warns Climate Change is Happening Now and Nobody Will be Spared

March 31, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on IPCC Report Warns Climate Change is Happening Now and Nobody Will be Spared

The United Nations’  Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a landmark report Monday on the impact of climate change at their gathering in Yokohama, Japan.  Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability  uses strong language to emphasise its conclusion that global warming is happening right now and will get worse unless the world acts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions . Read the rest of IPCC Report Warns Climate Change is Happening Now and Nobody Will be Spared Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: adaptation , Climate Change , Climate Change 2014: Impacts , global warming , Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change , IPCC , Japan , report , risks , UN , vulnerability        

Continued here: 
IPCC Report Warns Climate Change is Happening Now and Nobody Will be Spared

Is New York Turning on Tesla Too?

March 31, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Is New York Turning on Tesla Too?

The battle between Tesla Motors and Auto Dealers Associations across the United States keeps raging on. It turns out that New Jersey isn’t the only state that could pass legislation against Tesla’s direct-to-consumer sales approach this month – apparently legislators in New York are trying to advance a similar bill. Read the rest of Is New York Turning on Tesla Too? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: electric car , green car , green transportation , new jersey , New York League of Conservation of Voters , New York. , tesla , tesla model e , Tesla Model X , tesla model-s        

Original post: 
Is New York Turning on Tesla Too?

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2508 access attempts in the last 7 days.