6 Easy Eco-Actions To Take With Your Kids

July 29, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

A greener lifestyle is easier than you think. Here are six simple actions you can explore with your family. The post 6 Easy Eco-Actions To Take With Your Kids appeared first on Earth 911.

Read the original here:
6 Easy Eco-Actions To Take With Your Kids

Climate change, deforestation lead to younger, shorter trees

June 4, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Climate change, deforestation lead to younger, shorter trees

Recently published research in  Science  magazine warns that older, taller  trees  are quickly becoming a thing of the past, consequently leaving forests in disarray. Forest dynamics being disrupted like this spells trouble for ecosystem equilibrium and  biodiversity .  While natural disturbances —  flooding , landslides, insect infestations, fungi, vine overgrowth, disease, wildfire and even wind damage — negatively impact  forests , they do not compare with the magnitude of harm humans have precipitated. Consider how over-harvesting trees for more land use has altered forest landscapes. The felling of numerous tree stands has severely dwindled the carbon sinks required to fix excess atmospheric carbon resultant from human-induced  greenhouse gas emissions .  Related:  What’s causing the decline in monarch butterfly populations? Without the necessary  carbon  storage from forest trees, global temperatures will continue to rise and intensify consequent climate change damage.  Climate change  exacerbates conditions through insect and pathogen outbreaks that further compromise tree health and development. In fact,  research  has shown that annual “carbon storage lost to insects” equals “the amount of carbon emitted by 5 million vehicles.” This illustrates how substantial tree decline due to insects can be.  Why are biologists worried about the adversely shifting forest dynamics? As the  U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)  explained, “Wood harvests alone have had a huge impact on the shift of global forests towards younger ages or towards non-forest land, reducing the amount of forests, and old-growth forests, globally. Where forests are re-established on harvested land, the trees are smaller and  biomass  is reduced.”  Conservationists  subsequently admonish that continuing with business as usual will only worsen the conditions that increase tree mortality rates and the accompanying biodiversity crisis. As  NPR  reported, “Researchers found that the world lost roughly one-third of its old growth forest between 1900 and 2015. In North America and Europe , where more data was available, they found that tree mortality has doubled in the past 40 years.” It is believed these worrying trends will persist unless changes are made and new protection policies enacted.  Research team lead, Nate McDowell of PNNL, realized there was a major problem as he studied how global temperature rise affected tree growth and the changes occurring within a forest. Satellite imagery and modeling data unveiled a comprehensive view of the state of global forests and their shifts from older, taller trees to younger, shorter ones. The overall picture is of extensive loss. “I would recommend that people try to visit places with big trees now, while they can, with their kids,” McDowell advised. “Because there’s some significant threat, that might not be possible sometime in the future.” McDowell’s research ties in closely with last summer’s study from  National Science Review , which showcased how exposure to both rising temperatures and extreme temperature ranges have decreased  vegetation  growth throughout the northern hemisphere. The finding upended previous beliefs that  global warming  would increase vegetation photosynthesis and extend the photosynthetic growing season. Instead, global warming was seen to increase the chances of  drought  and wildfire, which reduced water availability and therefore distressed forest vegetation. + Science Via NPR and PNNL

Go here to see the original:
Climate change, deforestation lead to younger, shorter trees

Earth School offers kids interesting science lessons online

June 3, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Earth School offers kids interesting science lessons online

Kids stuck at home due to coronavirus have another opportunity for quality online learning. Earth School, a collaboration between TED-Ed (TED’s youth and education initiative) and the United Nations’ Environment Programme, is releasing 30 short videos to teach children about connections between nature and many aspects of society. The videos started dropping on Earth Day , April 22. Since then, the collaborators have released one video daily. The last video will be posted on June 5, World Environment Day. The videos will remain online and can be viewed consecutively or randomly. Related: Take a virtual dive with NOAA More than 30 organizations helped create the videos. The World Wildlife Fund, National Geographic and BBC contributed high-quality video footage, articles and digital interactive resources. The 30 video lessons fall into six categories: The Nature of Our Stuff, The Nature of Society, The Nature of Nature, The Nature of Change, The Nature of Individual Action and The Nature of Collective Action. The producers designed them to appeal to science-curious kids with topics like the lifecycle of a T-shirt, whether we should eat bugs, where does water come from and tracking grizzly bears from space. A press release stated the program’s three goals: to help kids and parents sort through a myriad of options to find a solid, reliable science source; to keep kids interested in nature even while they’re stuck inside; and to ease the load of harried parents who suddenly find themselves in charge of their kids’ education 24/7. Watching these videos will help children understand their roles as future stewards of our troubled planet. The last two weeks of instruction offer concrete ways kids can improve the world individually and collectively. As the press release explains, “We aim to inspire the awe and wonder of nature in Earth School students and help them finish the program with a firm grasp of how deeply intertwined we are with the planet.” + Earth School Image via Lukas

Read more from the original source:
Earth School offers kids interesting science lessons online

Rimbin concept offers a look into the future of infection-free playgrounds

June 1, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Rimbin concept offers a look into the future of infection-free playgrounds

Berlin-based inventors Martin Binder and Claudio Rimmele believe that parents shouldn’t have to make the choice whether or not to let their children enjoy a playground in a world changed by COVID-19. In the early days of the pandemic, Binder, a designer and artist, and Rimmele, a psychologist and publicist, noticed a shift in the playgrounds of their city. Where there were once lively, laughter-filled spots in the city were now forbidden and barren because of necessary precautions in the fight against the novel coronavirus. The two understood the importance of playgrounds for developing children’s social skills and improving mental health. Six weeks later, they found their solution in Rimbin, an infection-free playground concept inspired by nature and influenced by Berlin parents. Related: Solar-powered “bubble shield” focuses on physical distancing in public The concept calls for a separate play platform for each child and a playground path leading to each area with a separate entrance. The platforms are large enough for children or siblings of the same household to stay together, far enough from unfamiliar children to ensure social distancing, yet open enough for kids to communicate and play games from a safe distance. Features in between the platforms, such as speaking tubes, horizontal ladders and seesaws, offer interaction without the need for physical contact. Surface areas, handles and tubes would be made of metal materials that are easy to sterilize, and permanent disinfectant dispensers would be installed for parents if they’d like to clean as an additional safety precaution. Inspiration for the playground and platforms came from biology and nature, according to the designers. The play areas were created to imitate the leaves of the Amazon water lily, inspired by the 1849 project conducted by biologist Joseph Baxton where he placed his young daughter in the water lily leaves to demonstrate their strength and carrying power. Rimmele and Binder hope that the concept will allow the children of the future to continue to enjoy the social interactions, creativity and imagination that playgrounds helped encourage before the pandemic . + Martin Binder Images via Martin Binder

See original here: 
Rimbin concept offers a look into the future of infection-free playgrounds

PepsiCo CSO: We can’t ‘lose sight’ of the long-term crisis

April 20, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on PepsiCo CSO: We can’t ‘lose sight’ of the long-term crisis

PepsiCo CSO: We can’t ‘lose sight’ of the long-term crisis Heather Clancy Mon, 04/20/2020 – 02:00 With less than a year under his belt as PepsiCo’s first chief sustainability officer, long-term marketing and brand management executive Simon Lowden already had plenty of to-dos on his daily agenda when the coronavirus outbreak became a pandemic. While the focal point of his weekly check-ins with PepsiCo chairman and CEO Ramon Laguarta now includes short-term, urgent action items related to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lowden says his team is more energized than ever about its mission to tackle the longer-term crisis — mitigating climate change. Its latest commitment: signing the United Nations Global Compact Business Ambition for 1.5 Degrees C pledge , based on science-based targets. “Ramon is an incredible leader, very close to this agenda. I spend two hours a week with him on sustainability right now,” Lowden told GreenBiz. “Could you imagine that? It’s a $68 billion business. His operational time is clearly under pressure, and he still spends an hour and a half or so with me a week talking about pledges we’re getting into, commitments we’re making, partnerships with our customers, with peer industries as well as ensuring and supporting as we develop our go forward strategy and imperative plans around sustainability.” We caught up with Lowden about some of those priorities in an interview last week. Below is a transcription of that discussion, edited for length and clarity. Heather Clancy: How has the COVID-19 pandemic changed the immediate focus of PepsiCo’s sustainability team?   Simon Lowden: I’m really proud of what we’re doing with supply and demand, and we’re really proud of our frontline associates. We’re making sure that shelves are stocked and people can get all they need. For PepsiCo as a business, that’s our most important thing. I think what we’ve done is — when we start thinking about sustainability, then you orient towards support, right? — you think about communities.  We’re donating through our foundation $45 million to bring food to communities, 50 million meals to at risk populations. We’re really leaning in quite hard to making sure we play a significant role in providing people with resources that they can’t get. So that’s one thing we’re doing. We’re also making sure that we do our best with our brands.  I find myself being more inspired and probably more ambitious as we try and think about how we can operationalize sustainability across PepsiCo to new levels as we come through this. I think you’d agree PepsiCo is known for entertainment and has become quite [an] expert at that over the years — it brings people together, brings community together, brings groups of friends together. That’s why our brand Pepsi partnered with Global Citizen supporting the “Together at Home” concert on April 18 …  There would be two examples where I think as a company and as a sustainability team we’re trying to make sure we’re supporting the communities within which we operate.  We’re doing that whilst we ensure we don’t let short-term — we hope short-term, probably medium-term — issues affect the longer-term ambition of our sustainability strategy. I would suggest at the moment we’re really bringing up our efforts on personal and community health, ensuring that we spend this time to understand what, how people are reacting to things, what it will mean from their point of view around broader sustainability agenda and ensuring that we don’t confuse short-term requirements with fighting our longer-term ambitions.  Clancy: What happens to the work you had planned during this period when you are focused on that short term?  Lowden : The work continues. You know very well this is such a rapid changing space that we’re actually always evaluating, reevaluating our posture, our strategies, our intent, what our key message should be. We’re doing that work right now …  How do we ensure we build a leadership posture and get results in the right place for a future? Particularly when climate, I believe, is going to be an ever more critical thing to address as we come through this virus pandemic. Just look at what’s happening. Right now, if you’re in China, you’re seeing skylines you didn’t know existed. If you’re in India, you’re enjoying smoke-free cities in Delhi and Mumbai, and seeing the Himalayas for the first time in years. If you’re in Italy, you’re seeing clean canals in Venice. We’ll start seeing more and more of these sort of improvements driven through the lack of emission activity from mankind, and that’s something that’s going to have a demonstrative effect on what impact we can have. When you step back and say you know what? Climate change has been worsening. Our food system, which is under pressure right now in every fashion than it’s been before — it needs a transformation. There’s a lot of work to be done. We at PepsiCo believe we should be taking a leadership role in this. How can we ensure that what we grow and what we make and the products we produce, how can we ensure that’s doing the best thing for the planet?  I find myself being more inspired and probably more ambitious as we try and think about how we can operationalize sustainability across PepsiCo to new levels as we come through this. Maybe one big manifestation of that is that we just signed the United Nations Global Compact Business Ambition for 1.5 Degrees C pledge, which is based on science-based targets. We’re setting our emissions reduction target across our entire value chain, so that’s inclusive of Scope 3 as well as Scope 1 and 2, to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees above the pre-industrial level. We’re developing alongside this a longer-term strategy to ensure that we can get to net zero emissions by 2050. That ambition is what we’re working against now. And you’ll hear more about how we’re going to do that over the coming months. Clancy: Why was that important for you to do? Lowden: I think what we talk about now and what we do now shouldn’t deflect from what’s critical in 10 to 15 years’ time. This is what Earth Day is all about. We want to make sure that in years to come we have a planet that’s able to be lived in and enjoyed by generations and generations to come. I think we have a big role in that. I think if you stand back and look at PepsiCo’s business, we have probably three areas where we can certainly play our part in the climate action plans. One is around our agricultural footprint. We spend significant dollars every year on crops — on corn, potatoes, wheat, oranges, etc. And the agricultural supply chain, the agricultural industry has a massive opportunity to be a positive effect on what’s happening with climate change. And we’re doing a lot of work. We work with tens of thousands of farmers around the world, many of them smallholders. We’re making sure we bring to them through what we’re calling demonstration farms, new capability, new technology, new innovation that’s going to enable them to increase yield as well as decrease the consumption of, say, water per hectare they sow. By the same token, not just doing that but ensuring that the pesticides they use and the fertilizers they use are the right amounts at the right time of the growing season. And ensuring when they leave that field fallow it’s a carbon sink. That’s a big responsibility we have. Not only is it ensuring the farmers are economically, fiscally trained the right way and healthy, but the land we leave behind and the land that’s being used is healthier than it would have been without our expertise and is able to play its role in the climate change dynamic. So that’s one great example. Another great example is our manufacturing side. We have 100-something manufacturing sites around the world. In the U.S. we said we’re going to move to 100 percent renewable electricity across the U.S. businesses. Now the U.S., I think, uses just under 50 percent of our global electricity around PepsiCo. We’ve already got similar efforts underway in Mexico and in Europe. … We have bottling partnerships. We have packaging supplies. We have customers. How can we actually act as a catalyst? I think for PepsiCo it’s not just about all operations but it’s about how we then leverage the partnerships we have. We have bottling partnerships. We have packaging supplies. We have customers. How can we actually act as a catalyst? I’m sure you’ll have heard PepsiCo’s strategy about being “faster, stronger, better”  — faster around growth, stronger about the muscles we build and better about ensuring we do those things in a way that’s going to leave the planet in a better place than we found it. That’s going to become an operational mandate for PepsiCo. Clancy: I’ve been reading distressing stories about food going to waste because of the restaurant crisis. Have you changed your production help farmers during this particular time?   Lowden: We’re doing our best by the people we source from. I would say that we are operationally moving ahead as effectively as we can across most of the geographies around the world. I would say that our relationships with our suppliers, including our farmers, are as strong as ever. Of course, we take all precautions to ensure that across the full supply chain — whether it be from farmers or out to customers — that we’re paranoid about the continuous safety of our products and making sure our manufacturing locations practice social distancing, practice deep cleaning where appropriate, adhering to all of the local and new federal guidelines. We feel pretty good about that. We are looking at the supply chain from a food security standpoint. We put in some measures to control, to ensure that we control the spread of the virus, which could of course lead to massive disruption of supplies. If that were to happen, then the holding pattern would equally be changed. I guess we’re taking pretty strong action. We’ve worked with the world leaders, a number of food security and humanitarian organizations to ensure we’re lending our voice to keep trade flowing and particularly in places like Europe where we’ve got cross-border trading challenges and multi-country trading challenges. … Clancy: But how would you say this crisis has affected your relationships with your collaborators and partners? Lowden: I’d say that from an action point of view it’s a reinforcer, maybe an accelerator. I’d also say for the longer-term initiatives — we’re working with our competitors and our peer groups and industrial partners to find alternative packaging solutions, education platforms for consumers around recycling, new material development for our products. I think what people are realizing in the face of this is whatever change we’re going to make in the food and beverage category when it comes to sustainability more than ever requires a system change, more than ever requires partnership, and we have to move together. So I’d say that actually it’s a reinforcer of the need for organizations to work together.  Clancy: COVID-19 has put a real strain on municipal recycling programs around the world. How has this affected your packaging commitments and strategy? Lowden: It hasn’t affected our medium-term ambitions. We still have our goals to reduce virgin plastic content by 35 percent across beverages. We still have goals to ensure our packaging is 100 percent recyclable, compostable, biodegradable. We’re pledging millions and millions of dollars — more than $51 million between July 2018 and July 2019 — to boost recycling rates, a big endeavor around the U.S. in recycling partnerships. In no way, shape or form are we stepping back from those ambitions. Our SodaStream business still grows healthily, and we know that if that grows well that we’ll be able to effectively replace nearly 70 billion bottles from the marketplace over the next few years. None of those targets from our point of view are affected. Will there be short-term pressures? Maybe. I’m not sure we know yet to be honest with you. It’s certainly putting a strain on some programs, but we look at those as opportunities. We’re all safe harboring at home. This gives us the chance to think about our own practices, right? They say it takes what, four weeks to develop new muscles? I have really relaunched my own recycling efforts. Right? I’ve relearned what can and can’t be. I’ve relearned what can and can’t go into certain different trashcans and making sure that I’m doing my part 100 percent as I live at home and use more food materials. I think we have a big opportunity to ensure that we use this chance to educate people as they’re sheltering in place. And so that’s what we’re going to start doing.  Clancy: How does PepsiCo plan to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day given the crisis? Has your strategy changed? How has it changed? Lowden: Well, we’re not doing it face to face. So look. It’s really important to us. It’s a really important milestone for the planet and for us as a company. Of course, this virus has impacted it, like it’s impacted any other event. However, I think the energy behind the scenes is as high as ever. Actually it’s quite motivating to see a number of people, organizations, the broader world community to be very energetic still behind Earth Day. We want to make sure that we play our role in coming together as part of a global community and making sure that we can use this platform for positive change. …  My job is to make sure we don’t lose sight of the sustainability agenda and climate change we’re facing. We’re going to have recycling rallies and ensure that people are spending time with their kids at home. I should mention I’ve got two kids [in their 20s]. They’ve never been happier with the job I’m doing now. They think it’s the best thing I’ve done at PepsiCo, quite honestly. They’re a massive push for me, and I’m sure many people at home have got their kids and their families who want to be part of a movement around doing something good for the planet.  We’re also taking this moment to be a bit more reflective and give our employees a chance to think about collective responsibility. Today we’re facing disruption — everybody’s lives, personal, business lives are disrupted. It’s not business as usual. It gives us a chance to think about our actions and what they’re going to impact tomorrow. So we’re going to take this chance to talk to and educate people again and our employees again that protecting our planet and the well-being of each of us will require all of us to do our part. Clancy: What do you feel your most important priority is as a chief sustainability officer in this time? Lowden: I think my most important thing I can do in my role is to ensure that whilst we’re in this sort of short-term operational stress, which our frontline teams and our operation units are dealing with, that I ensure I hold the torch and ensure the sustainability agenda including the climate change agenda is driven forward through PepsiCo and that we don’t let what’s happening now deflect from what must be our longer-term leadership in this space. So that’s what I think my role is. Climate change, it’s not getting any better. I have to make sure that even as we operate business in the new reality — or the short-term reality — my job is to make sure we don’t lose sight of the sustainability agenda and climate change we’re facing. Pull Quote I find myself being more inspired and probably more ambitious as we try and think about how we can operationalize sustainability across PepsiCo to new levels as we come through this. We have bottling partnerships. We have packaging supplies. We have customers. How can we actually act as a catalyst? My job is to make sure we don’t lose sight of the sustainability agenda and climate change we’re facing. Topics Food Systems Food & Agriculture Earth Day Climate Strategy Collective Insight The GreenBiz Interview Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Simon Lowden, chief sustainability officer, PepsiCo PepsiCo Close Authorship

Here is the original:
PepsiCo CSO: We can’t ‘lose sight’ of the long-term crisis

How To Home-school Your Kids During the Coronavirus

April 7, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on How To Home-school Your Kids During the Coronavirus

Do you find yourself suddenly home-schooling your children with just … The post How To Home-school Your Kids During the Coronavirus appeared first on Earth911.com.

The rest is here:
How To Home-school Your Kids During the Coronavirus

Eco-friendly Gifts for Kids

December 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Eco-friendly Gifts for Kids

Eco-friendly gifts for kids? Yes, even when shopping for kids … The post Eco-friendly Gifts for Kids appeared first on Earth911.com.

More:
Eco-friendly Gifts for Kids

Have an eco-friendly Halloween and aim for zero-waste this October

October 28, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Have an eco-friendly Halloween and aim for zero-waste this October

Holidays and celebrations can take a toll on the environment. Between waste and consumption, Halloween festivities leave behind a giant carbon footprint. But with a little purposeful planning, your holiday can be fun and eco-friendly at the same time.  Go plastic free Obviously plastic is problematic for the planet from the petroleum used in production to the lack of sustainable disposal options. With some foresight you can mostly avoid plastic in favor of alternatives. For costumes, shop local or make your own so you can see plastic parts and avoid shipping packaging. Make costumes from natural fibers such as organic cotton or hemp. Use accessories of metal or wood. Swap out plastic trick-or-treat buckets with pillow cases or reusable shopping bags. Related: Light your pumpkins the EEK-o-friendly way this Halloween Multi-purpose decor One way to cut back on the “stuff” you accumulate for the holiday is to think seasonally. Focus on decor that can serve throughout the fall season rather than just until Halloween. Hay bales, corn stocks, pumpkins, gourds and potted plants create a welcoming display at the front door that is both sustainable and inviting well past Thanksgiving. Inside the home, target the classic sights, sounds and smells of fall with pumpkin spice candles, reflective glass displays and wreaths from burlap, straw or herbs. Organic plant-based food Holidays are for celebrating with friends and Halloween is the perfect time to invite your favorite witches and demons over for a party. Since it’s always in season to be nice to the planet, plan your party around organic (no pesticides and other toxins in the water and soil), plant-based (sans the carbon footprint of meat production) food . Make taco dip with tortilla headstones, adorable pumpkin cookies, a veggie platter in the shape of a skeleton or individual spider pizzas. Save gas Reducing gas consumption avoids the need for more oil drilling and limits your contribution to air pollution. Pick up your party supplies in advance when you are already running other errands to avoid extra trips to the store. Also, stay in your neighborhood for trick or treating if possible. Zero waste Aim for zero waste during Halloween as a challenge to yourself and your family. Work together to brainstorm ways to keep trash from taking over the holiday. Using the real plates and utensils is a great start, but you can avoid the need for dinnerware altogether by creating a menu consisting only of finger foods. Drag out the cloth napkins, too. Avoid throwing out your costume at the end of the holiday by using recyclable materials such as cardboard or save the outfit for another occasion. Be sure to donate or resell when it’s time for the final goodbye. Go second hand If Halloween is really your season to shine and you enjoy widespread decorating, spend some time at the local thrift shop where holiday decor comes in year-round. While you might still end up with non eco-friendly materials like plastic , giving those items a second life keeps them out of landfills. This is also true for costumes, lawn decorations and clothing. Tricks and treats Candy has become an integral part of the holiday and you can enjoy a treat without contributing to wasteful consumption. Start by setting a reasonable limit. While it’s fun to be out with the kids on Halloween, the treats they gather shouldn’t last until Valentine’s Day. There’s not much you can do about the plastic you’ll acquire during your trip around the neighborhood, but you can do your part when it comes to making a conscience choice about what you hand out at your door. Shop from fair trade companies and look for sustainable packaging. Also consider non-candy items or offer up a trick instead. Cut the electric bill You can enjoy your party without a spike in electrical use by making a few simple changes. Skip the TV shows and music and consider cutting the electricity all together. Halloween is the perfect occasion to take the party outside to celebrate around a wood fire under the stars and the harvest moon. Drop some submersible LED lights in the bottom of the apple dunk barrel and use solar lights to create paths or designate gathering areas. If the weather in your area isn’t cooperating with a nature party, bring it inside for a blackout party instead. Grab the solar lights from the yard and further illuminate the space with beeswax candles displayed on reflective metal or glass plates. For entertainment, share spooky stories and explain the history of the holiday to the younger generations.  Halloween is a ghoulishly fun holiday, but it doesn’t have to have a gastly impact on the planet. Set an example for your kids, guests and neighbors with thoughtful decor, costumes and party ideas that just may inspire them to make Halloween a real treat for the planet, too. Images via Shutterstock

View post:
Have an eco-friendly Halloween and aim for zero-waste this October

Italys 2020 World Expo pavilion celebrates sustainable, circular design

October 28, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Italys 2020 World Expo pavilion celebrates sustainable, circular design

Exactly one year before the opening of the World Fair in Dubai, Carlo Ratti Associati has unveiled images for Italy’s Expo 2020 pavilion. Created in collaboration with Italo Rota Building Office, matteogatto&associati and F&M Ingegneria, the temporary structure embodies circular principles to minimize waste and integrate recycled materials such as coffee grounds, mycelium and ocean plastic. To reduce the building’s environmental footprint, natural climate control strategies will be used instead of air conditioning. Inspired by the seafaring populations of the Mediterranean basin, the Italy Expo 2020 pavilion will be constructed out of three boats that will delivered to the site as a symbol of the figurative journey from Italy to Dubai . Once on site, the boats will be transformed into the pavilion’s roof with an undulating shape that recalls the sea and desert waves. Sinuous lines will be repeated at the base of the pavilion, which will be built from a giant dune made with real sand. Meanwhile, an adaptable facade made from LED lights and nautical ropes will be installed to broadcast multimedia content. Related: WOHA unveils a lush, net-zero Singapore Pavilion for the 2020 World Expo “We liked the idea of a pavilion that would continuously mutate into different forms,” said Carlo Ratti, founding partner of Carlo Ratti Associati and director of the MIT Senseable City Lab. “We pursued a kind of architecture that could be reconfigured both in the long-term — because of its circularity — and in the short term — thanks to digital technologies.” The pavilion’s circular design will be rendered visible in the construction. The skywalk, for example, will be constructed with materials created from discarded orange peels and used coffee grounds. Italy’s Expo 2020 Pavilion will open its doors to the public on October 20, 2020 in Dubai and remain open until April 10, 2021. + Carlo Ratti Associati Renderings by Gary di Silvio, Pasquale Milieri, Gianluca Zimbardi / Carlo Ratti Associati

See original here:
Italys 2020 World Expo pavilion celebrates sustainable, circular design

10 healthy Halloween treats to make this October

October 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 10 healthy Halloween treats to make this October

Halloween is notorious for one thing: candy. While it is expected for everyone to indulge every once in a while, most people choose to forget about their health completely when it comes to Halloween , using the holiday as an excuse to eat too many artificial sweets. We’ve rounded up a list of 10 healthier options for Halloween party treats that are good for you while still maintaining the spooky holiday spirit. Bell pepper jack-o’-lanterns The best way to trick (and treat) your kids into eating their vegetables this Halloween has to be these quirky bell pepper jack-o’-lanterns. Carefully use a small paring knife or cookie cutter to cut the classic jack-o’-lantern shape into fresh bell peppers. Get creative with different shapes for the mouth, eyes and nose. Stuff the tops with salad or fresh veggie sticks and serve with a side of homemade hummus or balsamic dressing. Save any extra bell peppers in the fridge to use in a stir fry or soup the next day. Chicken, bison or plant-based meatball eyeballs Swapping beef for ground chicken, 100 percent grass-fed bison or veggies and beans in a meatball recipe is a leaner, healthier alternative. Pop on some sliced olives to turn your meatballs into eyeballs, or stick thinly sliced bell peppers into the sides to make them look like spiders. Place your meatballs on a bed of your favorite homemade sauce with either zucchini noodles, spaghetti squash or brown rice pasta. Vegan cupcakes Take your favorite vegan cupcake recipe (we suggest our Vegan Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cupcakes ) and spice it up with a little Halloween flair. Top the cupcakes with delicious Greek yogurt frosting and fresh strawberry or raspberry compote for a blood-colored statement, or mix in some all-natural food coloring. Turmeric makes a good substitution for orange food coloring and matcha for green if you want to go with a pumpkin theme. Apple monsters Cut up some green apples into slices and sandwich your favorite nut butter in between. Stick in sunflower seeds to look like pointy monster teeth and add a sliced strawberry tongue. Instead of candy googly eyes, make eyeballs out of blueberries or grapes, and stick them into the tops of the apples with toothpicks.  Pumpkin soup witch’s brew Swap a regular bowl for a hollowed-out pumpkin tureen , and add a Halloween-themed topping to go along with your pumpkin soup. Use a bat-shaped cookie cutter to create bats out of whole-grain toast for dipping, or make a spider web shape out of crème fraîche to get extra festive. To double up on the party snacks, roast the pumpkin seeds from the tureen with salt, and set them out for your guests. Mandarin orange pumpkins and banana ghosts These little mandarin orange “pumpkins” are packed with vitamin D, and the accompanying banana “ghosts” are full of potassium . But the best part about making them? It is so easy, the whole family can join in. Peel mandarin oranges and stick a small slice of celery into the top to create the pumpkin stems. Use nut butter as a glue to place dark chocolate chips as the eyes and mouth on halved bananas for a ghostly face. Veggie dog mummies Swap classic hot dogs for vegan or veggie dogs for this flaky, filling recipe. Buy a pre-made dough or make your own, and cut it into strips before wrapping it around your hot dogs for a mummified look. Place your mummies on a baking sheet and bake in the oven until the dogs are hot all the way through and the dough is golden brown. Homemade ketchup or honey mustard go great for dipping. Olive spiders Olives are high in antioxidants, healthy fats and vitamin B, not to mention they are low in cholesterol and high in fiber — a recipe for good gut and heart health. Connect two olives, one large and one small, together with a toothpick. Stick dried spaghetti pasta into the sides for legs (don’t forget to save the pasta to cook later so it doesn’t go to waste !). Candy or caramel apples Make your own caramel or candy apples using organic ingredients, and choose healthier toppings such as dark chocolate, chopped almonds, chopped dates, dried fruit or coconut flakes. For a party-friendly dish, arrange apple slices on a Halloween platter and drizzle with caramel sauce in a creepy, spider-web design. Mashed cauliflower ghosts Going low-carb this Halloween? Mashed cauliflower is a super healthy alternative to mashed potatoes. Spoon your mash into a piping bag to help shape it into ghost form and decorate with cut chives, black olives, peas or sesame seeds. To make sure they hold their shape, you can opt to bake or broil them in the oven for a few minutes until the mash is firm. Images via Shutterstock

View original here: 
10 healthy Halloween treats to make this October

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1153 access attempts in the last 7 days.