Five DIY Baby Skin Care Recipes You Won’t Be Able To Live Without

September 8, 2020 by  
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There’s nothing more immaculate than baby skin, and for new … The post Five DIY Baby Skin Care Recipes You Won’t Be Able To Live Without appeared first on Earth 911.

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Five DIY Baby Skin Care Recipes You Won’t Be Able To Live Without

Unleash Kids’ Creativity With These Natural Craft Ideas

September 2, 2020 by  
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One of the most universal truths in the world is … The post Unleash Kids’ Creativity With These Natural Craft Ideas appeared first on Earth 911.

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5 cozy getaway cabins that are perfect for fall

September 1, 2020 by  
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Get away from it all and enjoy the beauty of fall in an Airbnb cabin. You can surround yourself in nature while you stay in a tiny cabin, or book a luxurious solar-powered cabin with all the bells and whistles. Airbnb is is a treasure trove full of eco-friendly getaway cabins that let you get off the grid and escape from it all. Eco-cottage in New York This beautiful, modern cottage is surrounded by tall trees and greenery. It has two bedrooms and one bathroom. Both bedrooms have queen-sized beds, and this cottage is full of great amenities. Not only is there Wi-Fi on the property, but there’s also a laptop workstation that is comfy and quiet. This is a single-level home with no stairs, and private parking is available. The spacious kitchen has all the extras: coffee maker, dishwasher and microwave. There’s a beautiful outdoor area with a grill, too. Related: Top fall camping destinations throughout the US This is an owner-built structure in a location that is perfect for getting out and enjoying nature. The cottage is surrounded by trails and breathtaking scenery that honors the beauty of the natural world. Rock Rest eco-cabin in Colorado This cabin in Colorado has a truly unique look because of the stone supports and the multicolored wood planks used to assemble it. The structure has a distinctly modern appearance that is also rustic inside and out. The owners wanted to create a retreat that paid homage to the environment, and they succeeded. The elevated cabin was built with the goal to leave the surrounding nature as undisturbed as possible . Inside, you’ll find stainless steel appliances, open shelving, concrete counters, a tankless water heater and a state-of-the-art wastewater treatment system that provides water for the trees. Other creature comforts include a smart TV, a washer and dryer and a large kitchen decked out with appliances for cooking delicious meals. The eco-cabin has one bathroom and one bedroom. The bedroom features a twin bed elevated above a queen-sized bed. The living room includes a day bed, and the porch also features a twin-sized bed swing, perfect for napping. Solar-powered cabin in Maine Enjoy a private getaway tucked among towering trees and surrounded by the sounds of wilderness in this solar-powered cabin in Maine . This is an off-grid retreat nestled among mountains and lakes. Tuck the kids into a handcrafted bunk bed while you rest on the double bed and enjoy views of the 33 acres of wooded hills that surround this space. There is a separate composting toilet and plenty more eco-friendly perks onsite. Treat yourself to locally roasted, organic coffee beans while you cook in the wood stove. The water is pure mountain water from the onsite well, and all of the electricity is provided by solar energy. The shower room is just a three-minute walk away. Get outdoors to take advantage of the soaking pools, dipping pools, fire circle and hammock — not to mention all those acres of natural beauty. Off-grid luxury cabin in Colorado Step outside and take in views of the incredible Colorado mountains in this off-grid, two-bedroom cabin . The cabin also has two bathrooms and luxury features everywhere you look. There is a separate suite, a laptop workspace, a cozy fireplace and of course Wi-Fi if you aren’t ready to completely unplug. There is a great selection of children’s books and toys, making it ideal for the whole family, plus on-premises parking. Related: A socially distanced vacation in eastern Oregon The Colorado wilderness itself is one of the main features of this eco-cabin. There are breathtaking vistas in all directions and a natural hot spring nearby. Fern Valley eco-cabin in New York This modern tiny cabin was inspired by Swedish architecture in a classic, lean-to style. The cabin may be small, but one whole wall is made up of windows so you are always surrounded by the glory of nature, even when you are indoors. This rugged cabin does not have modern features like running water (from November to April), electricity or Wi-Fi. Here, you can connect deeply with nature and truly live off of the grid. You can enjoy all 12 acres of the private property, including a pond, during your stay. Although it lacks water and electricity, the cabin does have some off-grid amenities, including a coffee maker and an outdoor grill. A queen-sized bed greets you at the end of a long day filled with adventure. Escape this fall With extra care and planning, you can enjoy some rest and relaxation this fall in an eco-cabin surrounded by autumnal beauty. Be sure to check out the advice on travel precautions from the CDC and WHO before taking off for your next socially distant getaway. Images courtesy of Airbnb

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6 Easy Eco-Actions To Take With Your Kids

July 29, 2020 by  
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A greener lifestyle is easier than you think. Here are six simple actions you can explore with your family. The post 6 Easy Eco-Actions To Take With Your Kids appeared first on Earth 911.

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Climate change, deforestation lead to younger, shorter trees

June 4, 2020 by  
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Recently published research in  Science  magazine warns that older, taller  trees  are quickly becoming a thing of the past, consequently leaving forests in disarray. Forest dynamics being disrupted like this spells trouble for ecosystem equilibrium and  biodiversity .  While natural disturbances —  flooding , landslides, insect infestations, fungi, vine overgrowth, disease, wildfire and even wind damage — negatively impact  forests , they do not compare with the magnitude of harm humans have precipitated. Consider how over-harvesting trees for more land use has altered forest landscapes. The felling of numerous tree stands has severely dwindled the carbon sinks required to fix excess atmospheric carbon resultant from human-induced  greenhouse gas emissions .  Related:  What’s causing the decline in monarch butterfly populations? Without the necessary  carbon  storage from forest trees, global temperatures will continue to rise and intensify consequent climate change damage.  Climate change  exacerbates conditions through insect and pathogen outbreaks that further compromise tree health and development. In fact,  research  has shown that annual “carbon storage lost to insects” equals “the amount of carbon emitted by 5 million vehicles.” This illustrates how substantial tree decline due to insects can be.  Why are biologists worried about the adversely shifting forest dynamics? As the  U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)  explained, “Wood harvests alone have had a huge impact on the shift of global forests towards younger ages or towards non-forest land, reducing the amount of forests, and old-growth forests, globally. Where forests are re-established on harvested land, the trees are smaller and  biomass  is reduced.”  Conservationists  subsequently admonish that continuing with business as usual will only worsen the conditions that increase tree mortality rates and the accompanying biodiversity crisis. As  NPR  reported, “Researchers found that the world lost roughly one-third of its old growth forest between 1900 and 2015. In North America and Europe , where more data was available, they found that tree mortality has doubled in the past 40 years.” It is believed these worrying trends will persist unless changes are made and new protection policies enacted.  Research team lead, Nate McDowell of PNNL, realized there was a major problem as he studied how global temperature rise affected tree growth and the changes occurring within a forest. Satellite imagery and modeling data unveiled a comprehensive view of the state of global forests and their shifts from older, taller trees to younger, shorter ones. The overall picture is of extensive loss. “I would recommend that people try to visit places with big trees now, while they can, with their kids,” McDowell advised. “Because there’s some significant threat, that might not be possible sometime in the future.” McDowell’s research ties in closely with last summer’s study from  National Science Review , which showcased how exposure to both rising temperatures and extreme temperature ranges have decreased  vegetation  growth throughout the northern hemisphere. The finding upended previous beliefs that  global warming  would increase vegetation photosynthesis and extend the photosynthetic growing season. Instead, global warming was seen to increase the chances of  drought  and wildfire, which reduced water availability and therefore distressed forest vegetation. + Science Via NPR and PNNL

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Earth School offers kids interesting science lessons online

June 3, 2020 by  
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Kids stuck at home due to coronavirus have another opportunity for quality online learning. Earth School, a collaboration between TED-Ed (TED’s youth and education initiative) and the United Nations’ Environment Programme, is releasing 30 short videos to teach children about connections between nature and many aspects of society. The videos started dropping on Earth Day , April 22. Since then, the collaborators have released one video daily. The last video will be posted on June 5, World Environment Day. The videos will remain online and can be viewed consecutively or randomly. Related: Take a virtual dive with NOAA More than 30 organizations helped create the videos. The World Wildlife Fund, National Geographic and BBC contributed high-quality video footage, articles and digital interactive resources. The 30 video lessons fall into six categories: The Nature of Our Stuff, The Nature of Society, The Nature of Nature, The Nature of Change, The Nature of Individual Action and The Nature of Collective Action. The producers designed them to appeal to science-curious kids with topics like the lifecycle of a T-shirt, whether we should eat bugs, where does water come from and tracking grizzly bears from space. A press release stated the program’s three goals: to help kids and parents sort through a myriad of options to find a solid, reliable science source; to keep kids interested in nature even while they’re stuck inside; and to ease the load of harried parents who suddenly find themselves in charge of their kids’ education 24/7. Watching these videos will help children understand their roles as future stewards of our troubled planet. The last two weeks of instruction offer concrete ways kids can improve the world individually and collectively. As the press release explains, “We aim to inspire the awe and wonder of nature in Earth School students and help them finish the program with a firm grasp of how deeply intertwined we are with the planet.” + Earth School Image via Lukas

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Rimbin concept offers a look into the future of infection-free playgrounds

June 1, 2020 by  
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Berlin-based inventors Martin Binder and Claudio Rimmele believe that parents shouldn’t have to make the choice whether or not to let their children enjoy a playground in a world changed by COVID-19. In the early days of the pandemic, Binder, a designer and artist, and Rimmele, a psychologist and publicist, noticed a shift in the playgrounds of their city. Where there were once lively, laughter-filled spots in the city were now forbidden and barren because of necessary precautions in the fight against the novel coronavirus. The two understood the importance of playgrounds for developing children’s social skills and improving mental health. Six weeks later, they found their solution in Rimbin, an infection-free playground concept inspired by nature and influenced by Berlin parents. Related: Solar-powered “bubble shield” focuses on physical distancing in public The concept calls for a separate play platform for each child and a playground path leading to each area with a separate entrance. The platforms are large enough for children or siblings of the same household to stay together, far enough from unfamiliar children to ensure social distancing, yet open enough for kids to communicate and play games from a safe distance. Features in between the platforms, such as speaking tubes, horizontal ladders and seesaws, offer interaction without the need for physical contact. Surface areas, handles and tubes would be made of metal materials that are easy to sterilize, and permanent disinfectant dispensers would be installed for parents if they’d like to clean as an additional safety precaution. Inspiration for the playground and platforms came from biology and nature, according to the designers. The play areas were created to imitate the leaves of the Amazon water lily, inspired by the 1849 project conducted by biologist Joseph Baxton where he placed his young daughter in the water lily leaves to demonstrate their strength and carrying power. Rimmele and Binder hope that the concept will allow the children of the future to continue to enjoy the social interactions, creativity and imagination that playgrounds helped encourage before the pandemic . + Martin Binder Images via Martin Binder

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PepsiCo CSO: We can’t ‘lose sight’ of the long-term crisis

April 20, 2020 by  
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PepsiCo CSO: We can’t ‘lose sight’ of the long-term crisis Heather Clancy Mon, 04/20/2020 – 02:00 With less than a year under his belt as PepsiCo’s first chief sustainability officer, long-term marketing and brand management executive Simon Lowden already had plenty of to-dos on his daily agenda when the coronavirus outbreak became a pandemic. While the focal point of his weekly check-ins with PepsiCo chairman and CEO Ramon Laguarta now includes short-term, urgent action items related to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lowden says his team is more energized than ever about its mission to tackle the longer-term crisis — mitigating climate change. Its latest commitment: signing the United Nations Global Compact Business Ambition for 1.5 Degrees C pledge , based on science-based targets. “Ramon is an incredible leader, very close to this agenda. I spend two hours a week with him on sustainability right now,” Lowden told GreenBiz. “Could you imagine that? It’s a $68 billion business. His operational time is clearly under pressure, and he still spends an hour and a half or so with me a week talking about pledges we’re getting into, commitments we’re making, partnerships with our customers, with peer industries as well as ensuring and supporting as we develop our go forward strategy and imperative plans around sustainability.” We caught up with Lowden about some of those priorities in an interview last week. Below is a transcription of that discussion, edited for length and clarity. Heather Clancy: How has the COVID-19 pandemic changed the immediate focus of PepsiCo’s sustainability team?   Simon Lowden: I’m really proud of what we’re doing with supply and demand, and we’re really proud of our frontline associates. We’re making sure that shelves are stocked and people can get all they need. For PepsiCo as a business, that’s our most important thing. I think what we’ve done is — when we start thinking about sustainability, then you orient towards support, right? — you think about communities.  We’re donating through our foundation $45 million to bring food to communities, 50 million meals to at risk populations. We’re really leaning in quite hard to making sure we play a significant role in providing people with resources that they can’t get. So that’s one thing we’re doing. We’re also making sure that we do our best with our brands.  I find myself being more inspired and probably more ambitious as we try and think about how we can operationalize sustainability across PepsiCo to new levels as we come through this. I think you’d agree PepsiCo is known for entertainment and has become quite [an] expert at that over the years — it brings people together, brings community together, brings groups of friends together. That’s why our brand Pepsi partnered with Global Citizen supporting the “Together at Home” concert on April 18 …  There would be two examples where I think as a company and as a sustainability team we’re trying to make sure we’re supporting the communities within which we operate.  We’re doing that whilst we ensure we don’t let short-term — we hope short-term, probably medium-term — issues affect the longer-term ambition of our sustainability strategy. I would suggest at the moment we’re really bringing up our efforts on personal and community health, ensuring that we spend this time to understand what, how people are reacting to things, what it will mean from their point of view around broader sustainability agenda and ensuring that we don’t confuse short-term requirements with fighting our longer-term ambitions.  Clancy: What happens to the work you had planned during this period when you are focused on that short term?  Lowden : The work continues. You know very well this is such a rapid changing space that we’re actually always evaluating, reevaluating our posture, our strategies, our intent, what our key message should be. We’re doing that work right now …  How do we ensure we build a leadership posture and get results in the right place for a future? Particularly when climate, I believe, is going to be an ever more critical thing to address as we come through this virus pandemic. Just look at what’s happening. Right now, if you’re in China, you’re seeing skylines you didn’t know existed. If you’re in India, you’re enjoying smoke-free cities in Delhi and Mumbai, and seeing the Himalayas for the first time in years. If you’re in Italy, you’re seeing clean canals in Venice. We’ll start seeing more and more of these sort of improvements driven through the lack of emission activity from mankind, and that’s something that’s going to have a demonstrative effect on what impact we can have. When you step back and say you know what? Climate change has been worsening. Our food system, which is under pressure right now in every fashion than it’s been before — it needs a transformation. There’s a lot of work to be done. We at PepsiCo believe we should be taking a leadership role in this. How can we ensure that what we grow and what we make and the products we produce, how can we ensure that’s doing the best thing for the planet?  I find myself being more inspired and probably more ambitious as we try and think about how we can operationalize sustainability across PepsiCo to new levels as we come through this. Maybe one big manifestation of that is that we just signed the United Nations Global Compact Business Ambition for 1.5 Degrees C pledge, which is based on science-based targets. We’re setting our emissions reduction target across our entire value chain, so that’s inclusive of Scope 3 as well as Scope 1 and 2, to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees above the pre-industrial level. We’re developing alongside this a longer-term strategy to ensure that we can get to net zero emissions by 2050. That ambition is what we’re working against now. And you’ll hear more about how we’re going to do that over the coming months. Clancy: Why was that important for you to do? Lowden: I think what we talk about now and what we do now shouldn’t deflect from what’s critical in 10 to 15 years’ time. This is what Earth Day is all about. We want to make sure that in years to come we have a planet that’s able to be lived in and enjoyed by generations and generations to come. I think we have a big role in that. I think if you stand back and look at PepsiCo’s business, we have probably three areas where we can certainly play our part in the climate action plans. One is around our agricultural footprint. We spend significant dollars every year on crops — on corn, potatoes, wheat, oranges, etc. And the agricultural supply chain, the agricultural industry has a massive opportunity to be a positive effect on what’s happening with climate change. And we’re doing a lot of work. We work with tens of thousands of farmers around the world, many of them smallholders. We’re making sure we bring to them through what we’re calling demonstration farms, new capability, new technology, new innovation that’s going to enable them to increase yield as well as decrease the consumption of, say, water per hectare they sow. By the same token, not just doing that but ensuring that the pesticides they use and the fertilizers they use are the right amounts at the right time of the growing season. And ensuring when they leave that field fallow it’s a carbon sink. That’s a big responsibility we have. Not only is it ensuring the farmers are economically, fiscally trained the right way and healthy, but the land we leave behind and the land that’s being used is healthier than it would have been without our expertise and is able to play its role in the climate change dynamic. So that’s one great example. Another great example is our manufacturing side. We have 100-something manufacturing sites around the world. In the U.S. we said we’re going to move to 100 percent renewable electricity across the U.S. businesses. Now the U.S., I think, uses just under 50 percent of our global electricity around PepsiCo. We’ve already got similar efforts underway in Mexico and in Europe. … We have bottling partnerships. We have packaging supplies. We have customers. How can we actually act as a catalyst? I think for PepsiCo it’s not just about all operations but it’s about how we then leverage the partnerships we have. We have bottling partnerships. We have packaging supplies. We have customers. How can we actually act as a catalyst? I’m sure you’ll have heard PepsiCo’s strategy about being “faster, stronger, better”  — faster around growth, stronger about the muscles we build and better about ensuring we do those things in a way that’s going to leave the planet in a better place than we found it. That’s going to become an operational mandate for PepsiCo. Clancy: I’ve been reading distressing stories about food going to waste because of the restaurant crisis. Have you changed your production help farmers during this particular time?   Lowden: We’re doing our best by the people we source from. I would say that we are operationally moving ahead as effectively as we can across most of the geographies around the world. I would say that our relationships with our suppliers, including our farmers, are as strong as ever. Of course, we take all precautions to ensure that across the full supply chain — whether it be from farmers or out to customers — that we’re paranoid about the continuous safety of our products and making sure our manufacturing locations practice social distancing, practice deep cleaning where appropriate, adhering to all of the local and new federal guidelines. We feel pretty good about that. We are looking at the supply chain from a food security standpoint. We put in some measures to control, to ensure that we control the spread of the virus, which could of course lead to massive disruption of supplies. If that were to happen, then the holding pattern would equally be changed. I guess we’re taking pretty strong action. We’ve worked with the world leaders, a number of food security and humanitarian organizations to ensure we’re lending our voice to keep trade flowing and particularly in places like Europe where we’ve got cross-border trading challenges and multi-country trading challenges. … Clancy: But how would you say this crisis has affected your relationships with your collaborators and partners? Lowden: I’d say that from an action point of view it’s a reinforcer, maybe an accelerator. I’d also say for the longer-term initiatives — we’re working with our competitors and our peer groups and industrial partners to find alternative packaging solutions, education platforms for consumers around recycling, new material development for our products. I think what people are realizing in the face of this is whatever change we’re going to make in the food and beverage category when it comes to sustainability more than ever requires a system change, more than ever requires partnership, and we have to move together. So I’d say that actually it’s a reinforcer of the need for organizations to work together.  Clancy: COVID-19 has put a real strain on municipal recycling programs around the world. How has this affected your packaging commitments and strategy? Lowden: It hasn’t affected our medium-term ambitions. We still have our goals to reduce virgin plastic content by 35 percent across beverages. We still have goals to ensure our packaging is 100 percent recyclable, compostable, biodegradable. We’re pledging millions and millions of dollars — more than $51 million between July 2018 and July 2019 — to boost recycling rates, a big endeavor around the U.S. in recycling partnerships. In no way, shape or form are we stepping back from those ambitions. Our SodaStream business still grows healthily, and we know that if that grows well that we’ll be able to effectively replace nearly 70 billion bottles from the marketplace over the next few years. None of those targets from our point of view are affected. Will there be short-term pressures? Maybe. I’m not sure we know yet to be honest with you. It’s certainly putting a strain on some programs, but we look at those as opportunities. We’re all safe harboring at home. This gives us the chance to think about our own practices, right? They say it takes what, four weeks to develop new muscles? I have really relaunched my own recycling efforts. Right? I’ve relearned what can and can’t be. I’ve relearned what can and can’t go into certain different trashcans and making sure that I’m doing my part 100 percent as I live at home and use more food materials. I think we have a big opportunity to ensure that we use this chance to educate people as they’re sheltering in place. And so that’s what we’re going to start doing.  Clancy: How does PepsiCo plan to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day given the crisis? Has your strategy changed? How has it changed? Lowden: Well, we’re not doing it face to face. So look. It’s really important to us. It’s a really important milestone for the planet and for us as a company. Of course, this virus has impacted it, like it’s impacted any other event. However, I think the energy behind the scenes is as high as ever. Actually it’s quite motivating to see a number of people, organizations, the broader world community to be very energetic still behind Earth Day. We want to make sure that we play our role in coming together as part of a global community and making sure that we can use this platform for positive change. …  My job is to make sure we don’t lose sight of the sustainability agenda and climate change we’re facing. We’re going to have recycling rallies and ensure that people are spending time with their kids at home. I should mention I’ve got two kids [in their 20s]. They’ve never been happier with the job I’m doing now. They think it’s the best thing I’ve done at PepsiCo, quite honestly. They’re a massive push for me, and I’m sure many people at home have got their kids and their families who want to be part of a movement around doing something good for the planet.  We’re also taking this moment to be a bit more reflective and give our employees a chance to think about collective responsibility. Today we’re facing disruption — everybody’s lives, personal, business lives are disrupted. It’s not business as usual. It gives us a chance to think about our actions and what they’re going to impact tomorrow. So we’re going to take this chance to talk to and educate people again and our employees again that protecting our planet and the well-being of each of us will require all of us to do our part. Clancy: What do you feel your most important priority is as a chief sustainability officer in this time? Lowden: I think my most important thing I can do in my role is to ensure that whilst we’re in this sort of short-term operational stress, which our frontline teams and our operation units are dealing with, that I ensure I hold the torch and ensure the sustainability agenda including the climate change agenda is driven forward through PepsiCo and that we don’t let what’s happening now deflect from what must be our longer-term leadership in this space. So that’s what I think my role is. Climate change, it’s not getting any better. I have to make sure that even as we operate business in the new reality — or the short-term reality — my job is to make sure we don’t lose sight of the sustainability agenda and climate change we’re facing. Pull Quote I find myself being more inspired and probably more ambitious as we try and think about how we can operationalize sustainability across PepsiCo to new levels as we come through this. We have bottling partnerships. We have packaging supplies. We have customers. How can we actually act as a catalyst? My job is to make sure we don’t lose sight of the sustainability agenda and climate change we’re facing. Topics Food Systems Food & Agriculture Earth Day Climate Strategy Collective Insight The GreenBiz Interview Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Simon Lowden, chief sustainability officer, PepsiCo PepsiCo Close Authorship

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How To Home-school Your Kids During the Coronavirus

April 7, 2020 by  
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Eco-friendly Gifts for Kids

December 18, 2019 by  
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Eco-friendly gifts for kids? Yes, even when shopping for kids … The post Eco-friendly Gifts for Kids appeared first on Earth911.com.

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