Seaweed pavilion encourages environmental conservation at WEF

February 4, 2020 by  
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In the landlocked Swiss town of Davos-Klosters, German designer Julia Lohmann has brought multi-sensory elements of the sea to guests of the World Economic Forum (WEF) 50th Annual Meeting. Hidaka Ohmu is a seaweed installation accompanied by a seaweed prototyping workshop. Created as part of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum exhibition, ‘Partnering with Nature,’ the installation aims to “encourage participants to play with natural elements, learn about the symbiotic relationships in nature and be inspired to imagine a more cohesive approach to working with nature.” Made from kelp and rattan, the organic pavilion immerses visitors in the scents and colors of the ocean as a reminder of the importance of environmental conservation. The Hidaka Ohmu installation is part of Julia Lohmann’s Department of Seaweed, an ongoing collection of work that explores the sustainable uses of seaweed and ways the material can be used to spark dialogue. At WEF, the installation took the shape of an organic pavilion with a rattan frame and semi-translucent kelp panels, the colors of which change depending on the light. Hidaka Ohmu takes its name from the Hidaka kelp used for the installation and the pavilion’s resemblance to Ohmu, the massive insect-like creatures from the 1984 Japanese animated film Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind , a cautionary sci-fi tale of environmental devastation. Related: 100% biodegradable, edible packaging is so much better than plastic In addition to exploring the sights and smells of Hidaka Ohmu, WEF participants were invited to create objects from seaweed themselves in Lohmann’s Department of Seaweed prototyping workshop. The workshop aims to make science and our relationship with nature more tangible as a means of encouraging environmentally responsible actions and raising awareness about climate change . The installation and workshop were presented from January 21 to January 24, 2020. “We need an empathic, more than human-centric way of engaging with nature,” Lohmann said. “Every species has an equal right to life on this planet. We can use the same human ingenuity that has led to the climate crisis we are facing now — and design has a lot to answer for in this — to protect and regenerate the ecosystem that sustains us.” + Julia Lohmann Photography by Valeriano Di Domenico, Farouk Pinjo, Claran McCrickard, and Sikarin Fon Thanachaiary via WEF

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Seaweed pavilion encourages environmental conservation at WEF

Sensational Seaweed: Julia Lohmann Creates Beautiful Lamps Out of Laser-Cut Kelp

October 25, 2012 by  
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It seems that kelp can do just about anything. From stabilizing and thickening foods to fertilizing plants, this giant algae has a million different applications. But who could have thought it would make an attractive addition to your home? Artist Julia Lohmann has used the sensational seaweed to create beautiful laser-cut lampshades. The kelp’s dried green skin produces a soft glow while the pierced geometric patterns reminiscent of Japanese textiles give the lampshade a lacy, delicate look. More fragile in appearance than her previous series of lamps,  Kelp Constructs , we can certainly imagine this seaweed gracing our homes. Read the rest of Sensational Seaweed: Julia Lohmann Creates Beautiful Lamps Out of Laser-Cut Kelp Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ‘Julia Lohmann , department of seaweed , herbert and christine weinberger , Kelp , kelp constructs , lampshade , London , moya hoke , ruminant bloom , Seaweed , v&a museum

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Sensational Seaweed: Julia Lohmann Creates Beautiful Lamps Out of Laser-Cut Kelp

Intermode’s Kilmore House is a Series of Efficient Modular Pavilions in Australia

October 25, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Intermode’s Kilmore House is a Series of Efficient Modular Pavilions in Australia Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , australia , carr , carr design , eco design , green architecture , Green Building , green design , intermode , kilmore , kilmore house , modular home , modular housing , passive solar , Prefab , prefab home , Sustainable Building , sustainable design

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Intermode’s Kilmore House is a Series of Efficient Modular Pavilions in Australia

DIY Builder James Higginson Uses Recycled Scaffolding Boards to Make a Beautiful Timber Wall

October 25, 2012 by  
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In an effort to build beautiful, functional pieces using cheap or free materials, DIY builder James Higginson recently constructed a gorgeous wall out of recycled scaffolding boards that were past their prime. The boards he found were split in places and were no longer useful as scaffolding, but for interior use they were perfect. As he explains on his blog , Higginson cut them and sanded them down, and treated them for termites before installing them. The resulting wall looks rustic, and it adds warmth to a room for little cost. + DIY on Facebook The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: DIY reclaimed wood wall , DIY recycled scaffolding , DIY tutorial , james higginson , reclaimed wood , recycled wood , timber wall

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DIY Builder James Higginson Uses Recycled Scaffolding Boards to Make a Beautiful Timber Wall

WBK Reuses Hundreds of Computer Keys to Create Portraits of Cultural Icons

October 25, 2012 by  
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What is they key to finding success and meaning as an artist? To Australian artist workbyknight  (WBK), it is is to “contribute to history…make work that references the age in which the artist lives. An artist should hold a mirror up to the world around him or her and comment upon reflection.” Seeing a world filled with buttons and other relics of technology, WBK  utilizes computer keys as the backdrop for pixelated portraits of cultural icons. Similar to Babis Panagiotidis’ “ Hedonism(y) Trojaner ,” WBK’s use of computer keys takes a ubiquitous tool of modern communication and reclaims them as a medium for artistic expression. Read the rest of WBK Reuses Hundreds of Computer Keys to Create Portraits of Cultural Icons Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Australian , babis panagiotidis , computer keys , deviantart , hedonism(y) trojaner , keyboard , sony walkman , wbk , workbyknight

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WBK Reuses Hundreds of Computer Keys to Create Portraits of Cultural Icons

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