Plogging: Sweden’s new fitness trend combines jogging and trash pickup

February 5, 2018 by  
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Plogging is a fitness trend that will help get you and the environment in shape. The BBC reported Scandinavians dreamed up this environmentally friendly form of exercise that blends jogging and picking up trash, and it’s taking off around the world. Joggers are taking their workout to new levels as they simultaneously run and pick up litter . The BBC said not only do ploggers receive the benefits of running, but also of core-boosting squat movements to bend down and grab those bottles, cans, or other junk discarded on the ground. All you need to become a plogger is a workout outfit, a bag to collect garbage, and, ideally, a pair of gloves. Related: This startup is training crows to throw away cigarette butt litter Core77 reported environmentalist Erik Ahlström is one of the movers and shakers behind the trend. When he moved from Swedish ski resort town Åre to Stockholm , he thought the city looked like a dump. He organized jogging groups to run equipped with gloves and garbage bags in an effort to clean up the city. He called this activity plogging, according to Core77, from the Swedish words for “to jog” and “to pick.” Plogga gruppen i Sundsvall går på djupet. Bra jobbat! #sundsvall @plogga A post shared by Plogga (@plogga) on Jul 12, 2017 at 12:27pm PDT Many people tend to sigh when they see litter, but the thought of picking it up still grosses them out. The plogging movement could change that, per the website Plogga , by making it trendy to clean up trash. Plogga cites Ahlström as the creator of plogging and calls on other people to get involved. The organization will help people get started or speak to businesses or schools about the fitness trend. En strålande förmiddag på så många vis! #plogging med underbara människor (för övrigt sjukt mycket skräp på bara en kvart!!!!) och sedan fantastiska stigar kring Hellasgården och stopp för kaffe. Japp, strålande på alla sätt!! ???? #teamnordictrail #plogga #plogging @ecotrailstockholm2017 @teamnordictrail @erikahlstromsweden @mar_ado A post shared by Miranda Kvist (@mirandakvist) on Oct 30, 2016 at 5:59am PDT The craze has caught on around the world. Plogging teams and communities are popping up from Paris to the United Kingdom to Thailand . + Plogga Via the BBC and Core77 Images via Depositphotos and Curtis MacNewton on Unsplash På regnigt uppdrag med bästa PLOGGA gänget i Visby/Almedalen! #plogga #havsmiljöinstitutet #hållsverigerent #almedalen #radiogotland A post shared by Plogga (@plogga) on Jul 4, 2017 at 12:40am PDT Idag har vi ploggat (plockat skräp+joggat). Förenat nytta med nöje. Det kändes så bra att röra på sig samtidigt som vi gav naturen lite ??. Vi fick ihop två fulla påsar på bara 3km. Tänkte köra igen nästa helg. Någon som hakar på oss? @supermiljobloggen @efagervall @markusfagervall @mrultimategreen @hallsverigerent @plogga #plogging #hållsverigerent #ettskräpomdagen A post shared by IDA KJOS (@idakjos) on Sep 16, 2017 at 8:47am PDT Plogging- Environmental tidy up Swedish style ie running whilst pick up rubbish . #plogging ,#plogger ,#swedish ,#environment ,#cleanup ,#runner ,#byronbayrunners A post shared by Geoff Bensley (@geoffbensley) on Feb 3, 2018 at 11:38pm PST

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Plogging: Sweden’s new fitness trend combines jogging and trash pickup

Scientists uncover hidden Mayan city of 10M people in Guatemala

February 5, 2018 by  
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An international team of researchers have identified tens of thousands of previously unknown Mayan structures using a high-tech aerial mapping technology known as Lidar. Discovered in the jungles of Guatemala , the ancient structures include homes, pyramids, defense installations, large-scale agricultural fields, and irrigation canals, suggesting that up to 10 million people lived in the area at its peak. “That is two to three times more [inhabitants] than people were saying there were,” Marcello A Canuto, a professor of anthropology at Tulane University, told The Guardian . Those that did live there clearly altered the landscape far more dramatically than previously thought. The research team, which includes scientists from the United States , Europe, and Guatemala working in collaboration with Guatemala’s Mayan Heritage and Nature Foundation , used Lidar, which stands for light detection and ranging, to virtually cut through the thick jungle . Lidar works by bouncing pulsed laser light off of the ground to unveil contours otherwise hidden. In addition to its use in archaeology, lidar also serves to assist the control and navigation of self-driving cars. Further areas of lidar application include seismology, laser guidance, and atmospheric physics. Related: Hidden passageway discovered at ancient Mayan ruins The recent discoveries in the Peten region of Guatemala have shown that in some areas of the now-thick jungle, up to 95 percent of land was used for agriculture . “Their agriculture is much more intensive and therefore sustainable than we thought, and they were cultivating every inch of the land,” Francisco Estrada-Belli, research assistant professor at Tulane University, told The Guardian . To do so, the Mayans drained swampland that even today is considered unfit for farming. The large scale of the projects demonstrates the coordinated effort required to complete them. “There’s state involvement here, because we see large canals being dug that are re-directing natural water flows,” Thomas Garrison, assistant professor of anthropology at Ithaca College in New York, told The Guardian . Despite the discovery’s massive size, it would have likely remained unknown without Lidar technology. “I found [an ancient road],” explained Garrison, “but if I had not had the Lidar and known that that’s what it was, I would have walked right over it, because of how dense the jungle is.” Via The Guardian Images via Ithaca College and Depositphotos

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Scientists uncover hidden Mayan city of 10M people in Guatemala

Polar bears could go extinct sooner than scientists previously thought

February 5, 2018 by  
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We’ve long known climate change will cause trouble for polar bears in the wild, but a new study reveals their metabolic rates are higher than we thought, and a changing environment is making it harder for them to snare enough food to satisfy energy needs. As they struggle to find prey, The Guardian reported they could go extinct faster than scientists previously feared. A team of scientists led by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Alaska Science Center and the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) studied nine polar bears over three years during a time period in April, in the Beaufort Sea near Alaska . They discovered the bears required three juveniles or one adult ringed seal every 10 days. But five of the nine polar bears didn’t reach that goal during the study, and their body weight plummeted as a result – up to around 44 pounds, during one study period of 10 days. Related: Video of starving polar bear ‘rips your heart out of your chest’ USGS biologist Anthony Pagano told The Guardian, “We found a feast and famine lifestyle – if they missed out on seals it had a pretty dramatic effect on them. We were surprised to see such big changes in body masses, at a time when they should be putting on bulk to sustain them during the year. This and other studies suggest that polar bears aren’t able to meet their bodily demands like they once were.” Metabolic rates the scientists measured in the field averaged over 50 percent higher than previous studies predicted. Combined with other studies on drops in the numbers of polar bears recently, and their body condition, scientists say this new study, published this month in Science , reveals the bears are in a worse plight than we thought. The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the global average, per The Guardian. Polar bears hunt for prey on sea ice , but as that ice diminishes, many polar bears must resort to foraging for food on land – like in garbage bins of remote towns, according to The Guardian. + University of California, Santa Cruz + Science Via The Guardian Images via Jessica K. Robertson, U.S. Geological Survey and Anthony M. Pagano, USGS

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Polar bears could go extinct sooner than scientists previously thought

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