How Pandora hopes to reach 100% recycled silver and gold

June 29, 2020 by  
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How Pandora hopes to reach 100% recycled silver and gold Deonna Anderson Mon, 06/29/2020 – 16:55 By 2030, Pandora, the world’s largest jewelry brand by volume, will use 100 percent recycled silver and gold in its products. At least that’s the goal the Danish company set at the beginning of June. As it stands, 71 percent of the silver and gold in Pandora jewelry comes from recycled sources. And the company sells a lot of jewelry: Fast Company noted that last year, it sold 96 million pieces of jewelry, or roughly 750,000 pounds of silver, which is more than any other company in the industry. Pandora said it uses palladium, copper and man-made stones, such as nano-crystals and cubic zirconia, in its products but the volume of those materials is small compared to its use of silver, which accounts for over half of all purchased product materials measured by weight. The jewelry company also uses gold at a smaller volume. Pandora’s 100 percent recycled silver and gold commitment comes after the disclosure in January of its aspirational pledge to become carbon neutral in the company’s own operations by 2025. “With that, we then, of course, sit down and look at what are the main levers that we can pull to reach carbon neutrality and to reduce the footprint of the value chain connected with crafting our jewelry, delivering our jewelry, and then this comes in as one of those components,” said Mads Twomey-Madsen, head of sustainability at Pandora. To further move toward its larger goal of reaching carbon neutrality, Twomey-Madsen said Pandora is thinking about how the company might reduce its footprint in other parts of the business. For example, as the world reopens after shutdowns related to the COVID-19 pandemic, the company plans to reduce the energy it uses in its retail stores as it related to lighting and heating. The company is developing new store concepts to shift the lighting installations and also adjusting its procurement policies for electricity in its network so that its stores are more energy efficient, and that it is sourced from renewable sources sourced wherever possible, according to Twomey-Madsen. He noted that shifting from partially virgin metals to 100 percent recycled metals will make a big difference in Pandora’s carbon footprint. The company anticipates that when it reaches this goal, it will reduce its CO2 emissions, water usage and other environmental impacts. Recycling metals uses fewer resources than mining new metals. Namely, it takes a third of the CO2 to extract the same silver from consumer electronics, when compared to mining silver, according to Pandora. So, how will the company close the 29 percent gap between the amount of recycled silver and gold is uses now and what it hopes to use 10 years from now? It plans to engage with key stakeholders in its supply chain, which will be vital. “Every aspect of the supply chain needs to be connected to create a more sustainable future,”  said Iris Van der Veken, executive director of the Responsible Jewelry Council, during a session at the U.N. Global Compact Leaders’ Summit, according to trade magazine Jewelry Outlook . Pandora is a member of the Responsible Jewelry Council, which sets sustainability standards for the industry on matters ranging from labor to toxics to emissions, and Twomey-Madsen said the company plans to engage with the council on certification as it works toward its latest goal. The company was able to reach its current 71 percent recycled content rate by obtaining that content on its own, melting the metals and then crafting the jewelry themselves. But the company also buys semi-finished jewelry pieces from other sources. “That’s the focus that we’ll have now to work with those suppliers and make sure that in their operations, the pieces that we purchase from them [are] also sourced with recycled metals,” Twomey-Madsen said. One of the challenges is that the amount of recycled silver available is pretty low. With that in mind, Pandora plans to help build up the supply. And electronic waste could be a significant source for “mining” recycled silver (and gold). There is a lot of e-waste but only about 20 percent of it is formally recycled, with the rest being informally recycled or going to the landfill, according to Twomey-Madsen.  But stakeholders in this work are trying to get to work. Twomey-Madsen said Pandora is seeing interest from potential collaborators in the recycled materials space, with “some from e-waste and some with recovery from other forms of waste or collection of waste.” “We are also having interest from companies that work with new materials. We are, of course, really happy for this and are in dialogue to see if this could lead to new cooperations,” wrote Twomey-Madsen by email, just before publication.  As more key players get involved in trying to make a circular economy work for the jewelry industry, an important factor to think about is transparency in traceability. There must be processes to make sure that actors are well informed across the supply chain about the origins of the metals, he said.  “That’s probably where we need to work the most. We don’t see it as something that we cannot get done,” Twomey-Madsen said, while noting that this process will take time. Topics Supply Chain Commitments & Goals Mining Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Courtesy of Pandora Jewellery Close Authorship

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How Pandora hopes to reach 100% recycled silver and gold

This recycled metal jewelry is inspired by our world

April 29, 2020 by  
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Raised in the countryside of South West England, creative artist Emma Aitchison has developed a jewelry line inspired by and respectful to nature . Furthermore, Aitchison wanted her unique designs to act as a symbol for environmental awareness and to provoke conversations about protecting vital resources on the planet. While Aitchison offers a line of handmade classics, she excels at giving old jewelry new life . This often means turning an antiquated family heirloom into something modern and personal or redesigning a broken piece into something striking. Each product is inspired by and named after our world, from the Current ring and Wave necklace to the popular Polluted bracelet and Magma earrings. Related: This jewelry is made with upcycled gold from Dell computers Sustainable practices have always been at the heart of the company. Emma Aitchison is based in the U.K. and has made a concentrated effort to partner only with other local businesses. This keeps transportation costs for materials and production low and reduces emissions. All items are packaged using eco-friendly filler that is reusable and recyclable. Perhaps the most notable nod to the planet is the company’s dedication to using only recycled gems. That means no virgin gems are mined or created in a lab for these necklaces, bracelets, earrings and rings. Instead, Emma Aitchison uses gems from old jewelry, including pieces already owned by customers. All silver necklaces are also made from 100% recycled metal. The company maintained carbon neutrality throughout 2018 and 2019 with these decisions plus its commitment to carbon offsetting. Every successful business looks to the future, but Emma Aitchison’s list of company goals looks different than most. It aims to continue streamlining supply, production and delivery in an eco-friendly way. For example, although the current gold-plating is done in London at a sustainable company, Ella Aitchison hopes to improve this practice by transitioning to solid gold that can be Fair Trade-certified and recycled. The company hopes to become zero-waste , too. In addition to eco-friendly packaging, delivery will employ bike couriers in the local area and carbon-neutral shipping companies elsewhere. A future studio update even includes recycled materials, solar panels and wind power to further reduce Emma Aitchison’s overall impact on the planet. During the coronavirus pandemic of 2020, the company has vowed to remain loyal to suppliers who are unable to provide products at this time. Instead, Emma Aitchison is continuing sales with the inventory it has in stock and is taking pre-orders for shipments once it can restock. It is also offering a 25% discount during this time. + Emma Aitchison Images via Emma Aitchison

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This recycled metal jewelry is inspired by our world

New net-zero LivingHomes capture the future of sustainable living

April 29, 2020 by  
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Koto Design has teamed up with Plant Prefab to create two new incredible net-zero energy homes. Koto LivingHome 1 and Koto LivingHome 2 are modular homes that incorporate sustainable living systems of the future. Under the ethos of creating great architecture that is more sustainable, the dwellings are powerhouses of energy-efficiency, with passive elements to reduce energy demand and active systems that allow homeowners to reduce electricity consumption through an app. Ranging in cost from $419,000 to $830,400, the new homes are available in two modular models, Koto LivingHome 1 and Koto LivingHome 2. Both homes are designed with a Scandinavian aesthetic. With clean lines and solid materials, they are built to have strong connections with the natural world through a variety of passive and active features that also keep energy needs to a minimum. Related: A prefabricated timber facade envelops a gorgeous glass home on a Norwegian island The larger of the two homes, nicknamed Piha (Finnish for “courtyard”), spans 2,184 square feet and features a spacious courtyard that melds the interior and exterior. The second home, dubbed Yksi (Finnish for “first”), is a smaller, two-bedroom residence. Designed to be ultra-resilient to various climates, the homes can be built in virtually any landscape, from frigid mountainous regions to warm beachfront properties. Both designs count on using an abundance of natural light and air ventilation to keep the interior spaces cool and cozy without the need for artificial systems. Although most prefab homes already feature a relatively small carbon footprint, the Koto homes meet net-zero energy targets and are built with eco-friendly materials, such as recycled insulation. The designs also incorporate efficient heating and cooling systems, low-flow water fixtures and LED lighting. Koto LivingHome 1 and Koto LivingHome 2 have monitoring systems accessible via smartphone to ensure all systems are operating at maximum efficiency. + Koto Design + Plant Prefab Images via Koto Design

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New net-zero LivingHomes capture the future of sustainable living

Bushwick bartender makes gorgeous necklaces from NYC’s trash

November 20, 2019 by  
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When she’s not slinging brews behind a Bushwick bar, designer Lorelei Christensen is scouring some of New York City’s darkest corners looking for debris that she can transform into shiny little pieces of eco-jewelry . Her company, Piece and Gathering , features necklaces that are made by encasing discarded items — anything from cigarette butts to chewed gum — in delicate glass pendants. Christensen, who has been working on her eco-jewelry collection for four years, often works late nights at a local bar. But during her free time, she can be found scouring for trash from specific locations, such as Central Park , Brooklyn Bridge and Bushwick, to use in her innovative creations. Related: This jewelry is made with upcycled gold from Dell computers “Collecting the debris is so interesting. I find surprising, funny, beautiful and disgusting things every single time. I can’t wait to find more people like me who will not only enjoy, but also profit from this new form of treasure seeking,” she explained. To create her designs, Christensen hand-crafts her pieces by encasing the discarded trash she finds in a clear, bio-resin surrounded by delicate, golden frames. In addition to her wearable items, she also makes small art pieces out of certain items she finds. A cool bauble for any occasion, the eco-jewelry also comes with a tag that identifies where the trash was sourced. The collection certainly gives new meaning to “statement piece.” Soon, the ambitious designer will be launching a Kickstarter that will specifically feature a select few pieces that were found at the top of the Empire State Building, the base of the Statue of Liberty and the streets of the World Pride Parade. For now, you can keep up with Christensen’s work on her Instagram page, Piece and Gathering . + Piece and Gathering Images via Piece and Gathering

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Bushwick bartender makes gorgeous necklaces from NYC’s trash

Geotectura Studio completes an ecological building on a former brownfield in Israel

December 5, 2018 by  
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A former brownfield has been transformed into the remediated site for ECO-TUBES, the Azriel Faculty of Design’s Workshop Building that boasts sustainable construction materials and energy-efficient systems. Designed by architect Joseph Cory of the Israeli architecture studio Geotectura Studio , the recently completed building was developed as part of the planned renovation of Shenkar College’s campus in Ramat Gan, Israel and features recycled and local materials along with non-toxic finishes. Selected as the winner of a competition, the Azriel Faculty of Design’s Workshops Building (ECO-TUBES) design was favored over other proposals due to its ability to be implemented in phases without disrupting student activity. Installed in two phases, the 6,600-square-meter Azriel Faculty of Design’s Workshops Building houses several workshop rooms—among them woodworking, metalworking, painting, foam manipulation and more—in addition to classrooms , offices, gallery spaces and the Gottesman Department of Jewelry Design. The building has also been engineered to allow for future growth through the addition of extra floors. In a nod to the city’s heritage as a major citrus producer, the landscaping features a variety of citrus trees (including orange, pomelo, lime, pomelit and grapefruit) to mimic an urban orchard. The roof has also been transformed into a mini orchard with container plants. The abundance of greenery, along with the vertical louvers, made from bamboo fiber and recycled plastic, helps to combat the urban heat island effect and create a pleasant microclimate. Related: Energy-plus home is a beacon of sustainability in Tel Aviv Designed with Buidling Information Modeling (BIM) to optimize energy efficiency , the U-Glass-clad building was constructed with a compact, well-insulated envelope and follows passive solar principles. “The conception of a compact shape led to minimal use of material, while maximizing natural light until late afternoon,” explains Geotectura Studio. “The building’s unique shape is based on polygonal segments with ecological glass and excellent insulation along the sides. The polygons extend the length of the southern façade, making it possible to place more workshop tools that require optimal natural light. The arched design creates optimization of maximal workstations receiving natural soft lighting.” + Geotectura Studio Images by Lior Avitan

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Geotectura Studio completes an ecological building on a former brownfield in Israel

How to Find Ethical Jewelry

November 20, 2018 by  
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No one wants to adorn themselves with environmental destruction and … The post How to Find Ethical Jewelry appeared first on Earth911.com.

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How to Find Ethical Jewelry

Earth911 Podcast, Nov. 8, 2018: Fair Trade Gold and Ethical Jewelry’s Deepest Questions

November 8, 2018 by  
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Mark Choyt, the founder of Reflective Jewelry, talks with Earth911 … The post Earth911 Podcast, Nov. 8, 2018: Fair Trade Gold and Ethical Jewelry’s Deepest Questions appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Podcast, Nov. 8, 2018: Fair Trade Gold and Ethical Jewelry’s Deepest Questions

Earth911 Podcast, Sept. 17, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear — Ethical Metals, Gemstones, & Jewelry

September 17, 2018 by  
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Learn what questions you should be asking a jeweler when … The post Earth911 Podcast, Sept. 17, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear — Ethical Metals, Gemstones, & Jewelry appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Podcast, Sept. 17, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear — Ethical Metals, Gemstones, & Jewelry

Hand-forged jewelry pays tribute to Gulf Coast fishermen

December 4, 2016 by  
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Though many may not realize it, the oyster industry in parts of the Gulf Coast has all but collapsed in recent years due to drought, oil spills, and a water rights struggle that spans three states. That’s why New Orleans-based designer Ashley Lyons is crafting a handmade line of jewelry that pays tribute to traditional fishing communities and hopes to help preserve their way of life.

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Hand-forged jewelry pays tribute to Gulf Coast fishermen

Daan Roosegaarde’s Smog Free Project kicks off 5-city tour of China

September 29, 2016 by  
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Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde’s Smog Free Tower is now open to the public in Beijing, the first of five Chinese cities on the Smog Free Project China tour. The Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection is backing the project, which launches today in the city center. Roosegaarde says the tour promotes the “dream of clean air and the beginning of a journey towards smarter cities.” The artist behind the pollution-busting vacuum tower is on a mission to raise awareness of China’s dirty skies, while giving visitors a little memento to help remind them once the Smog Free Project leaves their city. Jewelry made from collected smog particles—including rings and cufflinks—will serve as lasting reminders of the educational installation. Related: Daan Roosegaarde’s smog-sucking tower will clean the skies of China The Smog Free Project began in Rotterdam in 2013, when Roosegaarde and his team first constructed a prototype of the Smog Free Tower. After a successful pilot program there, the tower is kicking off a global tour, beginning with one of the most polluted countries on Earth. The 23-foot tower sucks up polluted air and filters out smog particles before releasing clean air back into the environment. While operating, the Smog Free Tower creates a small fresh air zone, allowing city dwellers to experience—perhaps for the first time—the difference between the urban air quality they live with daily and fresh, smog-free air. Although the Chinese government has been slow to respond to the growing air pollution problem in its urban centers, officials on deck for the Smog Free Project kickoff touted it as a step in the right direction. “This project is key in our agenda to promote clean air as a “green lifestyle” among Chinese citizens,” said Liu Guozheng, Secretary-General of The China Forum of Environmental Journalists. “Our goal is to guide the public to a healthier lifestyle, low carbon development and to raise awareness amongst the public and reduce smog.” + Studio Roosegaarde Images via Derrick Wang and Studio Roosegaarde

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