Shahar Livne turns recycled ocean plastic into Balenciaga jewelry

February 22, 2021 by  
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Award-winning conceptual material designer Shahar Livne collaborated with fashion design company Balenciaga to create a new line of jewelry made from recycled ocean plastic . Inhabitat caught up with Livne to hear more about the process and inspiration behind the project. “The collaboration took inspiration from my ongoing speculative research project ‘Metamorphism,’ which investigates the future of plastics within the geological record of the Earth and the rebirth of it as a possible future semi-natural material I named ‘Lithoplast,’” Livne told Inhabitat. “In the  ‘Metamorphism’ project, I use different plastics, ocean plastics, or landfill-designated plastics, in developing the new jewelry collection we worked with both, mainly PP and HDPE.” The jewelry line will be available for purchase on the Balenciaga website in May 2021. Related: Nonprofit Washed Ashore crafts art and jewelry from ocean plastic The ocean plastic comes from Oceanworks , a worldwide marketplace for recycled plastic products and raw materials. The company sources plastic materials from all over the world, focusing mainly in Southeast Asia, where it says 60% of the world’s ocean plastic originates. The jewelry line, which consists of bracelets, earrings and rings, also uses marble waste material sourced from a marble processing company as well as landfill-derived plastic from recycling companies. “It was interesting for us to work with OceanWorks-provided materials since we wanted to find the most sustainable and social option,” Livne went on to say. “OceanWorks is a global network that collected plastics from different areas, among them the oceans, with the help of fishermen and other beach cleaning operations, and the connection seemed perfect.” The designer followed a similar process to her “Metamorphism” project, using heat and pressure to create a composite material. The material is then molded by hand into vintage -style shapes designed by Balenciaga, 3D-scanned to create a mold (in order to recreate a coherent style for the entire collection) and then finished by hand by Livne herself. + Shahar Livne Design Via Dezeen Images via Balenciaga and Shahar Livne Design

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Shahar Livne turns recycled ocean plastic into Balenciaga jewelry

Nonprofit Washed Ashore crafts art and jewelry from ocean plastic

January 12, 2021 by  
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Washed Ashore is an environmental nonprofit that spreads the message about ocean pollution using the visual appeal of art. The giant animals created from marine debris have appeared at various events, both locally and as a traveling exhibit, since the organization’s inception in 2010. Now, the company is pivoting to also make jewelry from ocean plastic. Living in a coastal town provides a front-row view of the powerful ocean and the crippling consequences of plastics that get washed out to the waters, where they are ingested by marine animals or washed back up on the beach. While some people scour the beach for shells, Angela Haseltine Pozzi, founder and artistic director of Washed Ashore, instead searched for trash , starting in her small town of Bandon, Oregon. A long time artist and educator, she launched Washed Ashore in alignment with her lofty goals to clean the ocean and educate the local and global community about ocean pollution. Related: The Ocean Cleanup launches sunglasses made from ocean plastic The resulting 75+ art pieces each take shape as a large animal and incorporate plastic found during cleanup efforts. To date, more than 10,000 volunteers have collected and processed over 20 tons of debris. The team is growing alongside the mission to eradicate plastics from the ocean; as Pozzi summarized, “Until we run out of plastic on the beach, we will keep doing our work.” Now, for Washed Ashore’s 10-year anniversary, the nonprofit is offering specially crafted avant-garde jewelry pieces for sale to the community. Each creation is one-of-a-kind, from the marine debris necklaces to a recycled plastic anglerfish lamp. In addition to offering a new way to continue the conversation about ocean plastic, the proceeds will help cover operational costs for the organization, including beach cleanups. These pieces are currently for sale through Etsy . In maintaining its primary mission of educating about plastic pollution , each piece of artwork comes with literature about Washed Ashore and pointers on how to continue the conversation about the effects of our actions on marine life and ocean pollution. + Washed Ashore Design Images via Washed Ashore Design

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Nonprofit Washed Ashore crafts art and jewelry from ocean plastic

Eco-friendly holiday gifts your partner will love

December 14, 2020 by  
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If you’re a fan of Inhabitat, chances are your partner supports sustainable living as well! If not, what better time than the holidays to introduce your special someone to one or two of this year’s best eco-friendly products? Use our 2020 guide to the best holiday  gifts  for partners. Kimaï Jewelry Celebrating a special anniversary or ready to pop the question this holiday season?  Kimaï Jewelry  offers the perfect solution to unethically sourced minerals with its lab-grown diamonds and 18K recycled gold. Kimai diamonds are completely physically and chemically identical to the ones that come from the mining industry, making them a win for affordability and better treatment of the planet. Related: Where to find eco-friendly engagement and wedding rings Comfy, sustainable underwear Perhaps the best part of buying sustainable underwear? Those eco-friendly fabrics, like organic cotton , are always extra comfortable. Support companies like  TomboyX , which sources its material from OEKO-TEX 100 certified cotton (free from harsh or environmentally harmful chemicals) and provides inclusive sizes from XS-4X by fit-testing on all body types. Another one of our favorites is  Boodywear , made from organic, toxin-free bamboo plants. Bedding Snuggle up to your sweetie in bedding made of soft, sustainable material . Many of us are familiar with the popular  Avocado  organic bedding and eucalyptus sheets from  Buffy , but there are also plenty of lesser-known companies.  SOL Organics , for example, takes an ethical approach to its bedding, which is organic, fair trade-certified and tested for harmful substances. Eco-friendly eyewear An important accessory many of us use every day, eyewear doesn’t have to be made from unsustainable materials.  Bôhten Eyewear  makes lightweight handmade frames that are sourced from sustainable materials in Africa like Zebrawood, Walnut, Ebony and Maple wood carbon fiber veneer. The company even makes blue light filtering lenses that protect your eyes from harmful blue light exposure. You can also check out 100% biodegradable sunglasses from  Pela Vision . Proud Pour Wines In September, Inhabitat  reviewed  a wine company that uses a portion of its proceeds to benefit 22 different environmental nonprofits that do everything from protecting bees and wild oysters to sea turtle and coral reef  conservation . As the holidays approach,  Proud Pour Wines  should definitely stay on your radar. Bring a bottle or two to family dinner or gift your partner a starter pack, which includes three different bottles of wine supporting reefs (Rosé), oysters (Sauvignon Blanc) and bees (Pinot Noir). After you make a purchase, the company buys carbon offsets for your shipment. Loungewear A lesson in  sustainable fashion , Canadian-based  Kotn  uses direct trade to source raw ingredients straight from farmers (without the use of middlemen) to provide customers with fair prices that reflect quality and provide farmers with better prices and ethical business practices. The loungewear is made from authentic Egyptian Giza cotton, and proceeds help fund quality children’s education in the farming communities where the company sources its material. Sneakers For footwear lovers, there’s been no shortage of fun sneakers made from sustainable materials in 2020.  Allbirds , shoes made from eucalyptus wood pulp and Merino Wool are always a popular option, but you can also find amazing vegan footwear options at  Cariuma  or even fashion shoes made from  upcycled algae . Hobby classes Give the gift of knowledge with a subscription to unlimited online hobby classes by  Brit+Co  for just $10, or opt for more traditional educational courses from  Coursera  (where some classes can even be exchanged for college course credit). Masterclass ($15 a month billed annually) is also a fun idea, with online classes taught by some of the greatest minds in everything from arts and entertainment to cooking and sports. Book a staycation Choose a gift that benefits both of you by booking a staycation through Airbnb or Glampinghub. With coronavirus likely restricting travel well into 2021, opting for a vacation close to home is the way to go this year. Even better, an outdoor  camping  trip offers a great way to disconnect from the rest of the world while enjoying nature and staying safely socially distanced. Ethical cashmere sweater Cashmere is a natural fabric , made from a type of goat that produces fine, soft wool that is usually shorn off about twice a year. Unfortunately, cashmere goats are often mistreated due to the high value of the fiber, and an uptick in production has created grazing pressure leading to the degradation of native grasslands, so seeking out a company that produces sustainable and ethical cashmere is important. Naadam sources directly from Mongolian herders while investing in veterinary care for the goats, and Kering has partnered with the Wildlife Conservation Society to help educate herders on more sustainable approaches. Healthy cookbook Whether your partner is vegan , vegetarian or just likes to eat healthy, there’s a cookbook for it in 2020! Plus, cooking together is one of the best parts of the holidays and an even better idea for date nights. Vegan chef Marina Delio wrote a book called Vegan In An Instant  full of over 100 plant based recipes for your slow cooker (for those busy post-holiday evenings), and Dan Buettner has gathered recipes from Blue Zones to bring us The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to Live to 100 . Images via Amazon, Avocado, Bôhten Eyewear, Katherine Gallagher / Inhabitat, Kimaï, Kotn, Naadam, Pixabay, Proud Pour and TomboyX

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FOReT’s accessories marry sustainability with high-fashion

August 7, 2020 by  
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Mining for metals and gems often harms the environment — to say nothing of the leather, ivory regularly used to produce accessories. But who says that beauty has to hurt the Earth? Many less harmful options exist, and FOReT proves this with its line of sustainable, eco-friendly cork jewelry . FOReT keeps nature in mind and centers sustainable philosophies through every stage of production. Most FOReT jewelry uses cork, with small amounts of polyester and polyurethane. Cork comes from the outer layer of oak tree bark, which gets harvested every nine years. The harvesting process does not harm the tree, and in time, the bark grows back. This process encourages growth and renewal in the tree. Cork also helps make FOReT’s accessories water-resistant and durable. The jewelry line includes a range of eye-catching jewelry, including necklaces, bracelets, rings and earrings. Even FOReT’s handbags and wallets use cork . FOReT’s wide product range helps you create a variety of looks. Each accessory features a high-end look and distinct style meant to get noticed. As FOReT’s website states, “We believe that there is no greater designer than Nature and this led us in search of a material that encapsulates its ethereal beauty. We came across the beautiful cork and were completely enamoured by it, inspiring us to launch our sustainable brand FOReT. At FOReT, we aim to create products that have a positive impact on our lifestyle and environment without compromising on the latest style and trends using the choicest of materials that resonate with being earth-friendly and responsible.” That’s what FOReT stands for, sustainable, responsibly-made fashion . The company commits to making the world a greener place. Every purchase helps fund FOReT’s biodiversity initiative with SankalpTaru , an NGO that plants trees in India. This initiative focuses on “planting and maintaining trees and supporting rural farmers.” FOReT is also a PETA-approved vegan company. + FOReT Images via FOReT

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FOReT’s accessories marry sustainability with high-fashion

How Pandora hopes to reach 100% recycled silver and gold

June 29, 2020 by  
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How Pandora hopes to reach 100% recycled silver and gold Deonna Anderson Mon, 06/29/2020 – 16:55 By 2030, Pandora, the world’s largest jewelry brand by volume, will use 100 percent recycled silver and gold in its products. At least that’s the goal the Danish company set at the beginning of June. As it stands, 71 percent of the silver and gold in Pandora jewelry comes from recycled sources. And the company sells a lot of jewelry: Fast Company noted that last year, it sold 96 million pieces of jewelry, or roughly 750,000 pounds of silver, which is more than any other company in the industry. Pandora said it uses palladium, copper and man-made stones, such as nano-crystals and cubic zirconia, in its products but the volume of those materials is small compared to its use of silver, which accounts for over half of all purchased product materials measured by weight. The jewelry company also uses gold at a smaller volume. Pandora’s 100 percent recycled silver and gold commitment comes after the disclosure in January of its aspirational pledge to become carbon neutral in the company’s own operations by 2025. “With that, we then, of course, sit down and look at what are the main levers that we can pull to reach carbon neutrality and to reduce the footprint of the value chain connected with crafting our jewelry, delivering our jewelry, and then this comes in as one of those components,” said Mads Twomey-Madsen, head of sustainability at Pandora. To further move toward its larger goal of reaching carbon neutrality, Twomey-Madsen said Pandora is thinking about how the company might reduce its footprint in other parts of the business. For example, as the world reopens after shutdowns related to the COVID-19 pandemic, the company plans to reduce the energy it uses in its retail stores as it related to lighting and heating. The company is developing new store concepts to shift the lighting installations and also adjusting its procurement policies for electricity in its network so that its stores are more energy efficient, and that it is sourced from renewable sources sourced wherever possible, according to Twomey-Madsen. He noted that shifting from partially virgin metals to 100 percent recycled metals will make a big difference in Pandora’s carbon footprint. The company anticipates that when it reaches this goal, it will reduce its CO2 emissions, water usage and other environmental impacts. Recycling metals uses fewer resources than mining new metals. Namely, it takes a third of the CO2 to extract the same silver from consumer electronics, when compared to mining silver, according to Pandora. So, how will the company close the 29 percent gap between the amount of recycled silver and gold is uses now and what it hopes to use 10 years from now? It plans to engage with key stakeholders in its supply chain, which will be vital. “Every aspect of the supply chain needs to be connected to create a more sustainable future,”  said Iris Van der Veken, executive director of the Responsible Jewelry Council, during a session at the U.N. Global Compact Leaders’ Summit, according to trade magazine Jewelry Outlook . Pandora is a member of the Responsible Jewelry Council, which sets sustainability standards for the industry on matters ranging from labor to toxics to emissions, and Twomey-Madsen said the company plans to engage with the council on certification as it works toward its latest goal. The company was able to reach its current 71 percent recycled content rate by obtaining that content on its own, melting the metals and then crafting the jewelry themselves. But the company also buys semi-finished jewelry pieces from other sources. “That’s the focus that we’ll have now to work with those suppliers and make sure that in their operations, the pieces that we purchase from them [are] also sourced with recycled metals,” Twomey-Madsen said. One of the challenges is that the amount of recycled silver available is pretty low. With that in mind, Pandora plans to help build up the supply. And electronic waste could be a significant source for “mining” recycled silver (and gold). There is a lot of e-waste but only about 20 percent of it is formally recycled, with the rest being informally recycled or going to the landfill, according to Twomey-Madsen.  But stakeholders in this work are trying to get to work. Twomey-Madsen said Pandora is seeing interest from potential collaborators in the recycled materials space, with “some from e-waste and some with recovery from other forms of waste or collection of waste.” “We are also having interest from companies that work with new materials. We are, of course, really happy for this and are in dialogue to see if this could lead to new cooperations,” wrote Twomey-Madsen by email, just before publication.  As more key players get involved in trying to make a circular economy work for the jewelry industry, an important factor to think about is transparency in traceability. There must be processes to make sure that actors are well informed across the supply chain about the origins of the metals, he said.  “That’s probably where we need to work the most. We don’t see it as something that we cannot get done,” Twomey-Madsen said, while noting that this process will take time. Topics Supply Chain Commitments & Goals Mining Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Courtesy of Pandora Jewellery Close Authorship

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How Pandora hopes to reach 100% recycled silver and gold

This recycled metal jewelry is inspired by our world

April 29, 2020 by  
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Raised in the countryside of South West England, creative artist Emma Aitchison has developed a jewelry line inspired by and respectful to nature . Furthermore, Aitchison wanted her unique designs to act as a symbol for environmental awareness and to provoke conversations about protecting vital resources on the planet. While Aitchison offers a line of handmade classics, she excels at giving old jewelry new life . This often means turning an antiquated family heirloom into something modern and personal or redesigning a broken piece into something striking. Each product is inspired by and named after our world, from the Current ring and Wave necklace to the popular Polluted bracelet and Magma earrings. Related: This jewelry is made with upcycled gold from Dell computers Sustainable practices have always been at the heart of the company. Emma Aitchison is based in the U.K. and has made a concentrated effort to partner only with other local businesses. This keeps transportation costs for materials and production low and reduces emissions. All items are packaged using eco-friendly filler that is reusable and recyclable. Perhaps the most notable nod to the planet is the company’s dedication to using only recycled gems. That means no virgin gems are mined or created in a lab for these necklaces, bracelets, earrings and rings. Instead, Emma Aitchison uses gems from old jewelry, including pieces already owned by customers. All silver necklaces are also made from 100% recycled metal. The company maintained carbon neutrality throughout 2018 and 2019 with these decisions plus its commitment to carbon offsetting. Every successful business looks to the future, but Emma Aitchison’s list of company goals looks different than most. It aims to continue streamlining supply, production and delivery in an eco-friendly way. For example, although the current gold-plating is done in London at a sustainable company, Ella Aitchison hopes to improve this practice by transitioning to solid gold that can be Fair Trade-certified and recycled. The company hopes to become zero-waste , too. In addition to eco-friendly packaging, delivery will employ bike couriers in the local area and carbon-neutral shipping companies elsewhere. A future studio update even includes recycled materials, solar panels and wind power to further reduce Emma Aitchison’s overall impact on the planet. During the coronavirus pandemic of 2020, the company has vowed to remain loyal to suppliers who are unable to provide products at this time. Instead, Emma Aitchison is continuing sales with the inventory it has in stock and is taking pre-orders for shipments once it can restock. It is also offering a 25% discount during this time. + Emma Aitchison Images via Emma Aitchison

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This recycled metal jewelry is inspired by our world

New net-zero LivingHomes capture the future of sustainable living

April 29, 2020 by  
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Koto Design has teamed up with Plant Prefab to create two new incredible net-zero energy homes. Koto LivingHome 1 and Koto LivingHome 2 are modular homes that incorporate sustainable living systems of the future. Under the ethos of creating great architecture that is more sustainable, the dwellings are powerhouses of energy-efficiency, with passive elements to reduce energy demand and active systems that allow homeowners to reduce electricity consumption through an app. Ranging in cost from $419,000 to $830,400, the new homes are available in two modular models, Koto LivingHome 1 and Koto LivingHome 2. Both homes are designed with a Scandinavian aesthetic. With clean lines and solid materials, they are built to have strong connections with the natural world through a variety of passive and active features that also keep energy needs to a minimum. Related: A prefabricated timber facade envelops a gorgeous glass home on a Norwegian island The larger of the two homes, nicknamed Piha (Finnish for “courtyard”), spans 2,184 square feet and features a spacious courtyard that melds the interior and exterior. The second home, dubbed Yksi (Finnish for “first”), is a smaller, two-bedroom residence. Designed to be ultra-resilient to various climates, the homes can be built in virtually any landscape, from frigid mountainous regions to warm beachfront properties. Both designs count on using an abundance of natural light and air ventilation to keep the interior spaces cool and cozy without the need for artificial systems. Although most prefab homes already feature a relatively small carbon footprint, the Koto homes meet net-zero energy targets and are built with eco-friendly materials, such as recycled insulation. The designs also incorporate efficient heating and cooling systems, low-flow water fixtures and LED lighting. Koto LivingHome 1 and Koto LivingHome 2 have monitoring systems accessible via smartphone to ensure all systems are operating at maximum efficiency. + Koto Design + Plant Prefab Images via Koto Design

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New net-zero LivingHomes capture the future of sustainable living

Bushwick bartender makes gorgeous necklaces from NYC’s trash

November 20, 2019 by  
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When she’s not slinging brews behind a Bushwick bar, designer Lorelei Christensen is scouring some of New York City’s darkest corners looking for debris that she can transform into shiny little pieces of eco-jewelry . Her company, Piece and Gathering , features necklaces that are made by encasing discarded items — anything from cigarette butts to chewed gum — in delicate glass pendants. Christensen, who has been working on her eco-jewelry collection for four years, often works late nights at a local bar. But during her free time, she can be found scouring for trash from specific locations, such as Central Park , Brooklyn Bridge and Bushwick, to use in her innovative creations. Related: This jewelry is made with upcycled gold from Dell computers “Collecting the debris is so interesting. I find surprising, funny, beautiful and disgusting things every single time. I can’t wait to find more people like me who will not only enjoy, but also profit from this new form of treasure seeking,” she explained. To create her designs, Christensen hand-crafts her pieces by encasing the discarded trash she finds in a clear, bio-resin surrounded by delicate, golden frames. In addition to her wearable items, she also makes small art pieces out of certain items she finds. A cool bauble for any occasion, the eco-jewelry also comes with a tag that identifies where the trash was sourced. The collection certainly gives new meaning to “statement piece.” Soon, the ambitious designer will be launching a Kickstarter that will specifically feature a select few pieces that were found at the top of the Empire State Building, the base of the Statue of Liberty and the streets of the World Pride Parade. For now, you can keep up with Christensen’s work on her Instagram page, Piece and Gathering . + Piece and Gathering Images via Piece and Gathering

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Bushwick bartender makes gorgeous necklaces from NYC’s trash

Geotectura Studio completes an ecological building on a former brownfield in Israel

December 5, 2018 by  
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A former brownfield has been transformed into the remediated site for ECO-TUBES, the Azriel Faculty of Design’s Workshop Building that boasts sustainable construction materials and energy-efficient systems. Designed by architect Joseph Cory of the Israeli architecture studio Geotectura Studio , the recently completed building was developed as part of the planned renovation of Shenkar College’s campus in Ramat Gan, Israel and features recycled and local materials along with non-toxic finishes. Selected as the winner of a competition, the Azriel Faculty of Design’s Workshops Building (ECO-TUBES) design was favored over other proposals due to its ability to be implemented in phases without disrupting student activity. Installed in two phases, the 6,600-square-meter Azriel Faculty of Design’s Workshops Building houses several workshop rooms—among them woodworking, metalworking, painting, foam manipulation and more—in addition to classrooms , offices, gallery spaces and the Gottesman Department of Jewelry Design. The building has also been engineered to allow for future growth through the addition of extra floors. In a nod to the city’s heritage as a major citrus producer, the landscaping features a variety of citrus trees (including orange, pomelo, lime, pomelit and grapefruit) to mimic an urban orchard. The roof has also been transformed into a mini orchard with container plants. The abundance of greenery, along with the vertical louvers, made from bamboo fiber and recycled plastic, helps to combat the urban heat island effect and create a pleasant microclimate. Related: Energy-plus home is a beacon of sustainability in Tel Aviv Designed with Buidling Information Modeling (BIM) to optimize energy efficiency , the U-Glass-clad building was constructed with a compact, well-insulated envelope and follows passive solar principles. “The conception of a compact shape led to minimal use of material, while maximizing natural light until late afternoon,” explains Geotectura Studio. “The building’s unique shape is based on polygonal segments with ecological glass and excellent insulation along the sides. The polygons extend the length of the southern façade, making it possible to place more workshop tools that require optimal natural light. The arched design creates optimization of maximal workstations receiving natural soft lighting.” + Geotectura Studio Images by Lior Avitan

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Geotectura Studio completes an ecological building on a former brownfield in Israel

How to Find Ethical Jewelry

November 20, 2018 by  
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No one wants to adorn themselves with environmental destruction and … The post How to Find Ethical Jewelry appeared first on Earth911.com.

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