Futuristic solar fabric canopy reacts to heat, sunlight, and movement

June 28, 2017 by  
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MoMA PS1 just completed one of its most experimental and coolest installations to date. The Long Island City-based contemporary art museum wrapped up construction on Lumen, an immersive and interactive installation made with solar-active canopies that glow at night. Designed by Jenny Sabin Studio , Lumen reacts like a living entity to light, heat, and movement, creating different engaging environments from day to night. Set to open to the public Thursday, June 29, Lumen will be on view in MoMA’s PS1 courtyard during summer 2017. The futuristic canopy was selected as the winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program that challenges emerging designers to create a temporary, outdoor installation addressing environmental issues and forward-thinking design. Jenny Sabin Studio designed Lumen with over a million yards of digitally knitted fiber made from recycled photo-luminescent textiles that absorb solar energy during the day and emit glowing hues of blue, pink, and purple at night. The cellular canopies are stretched overtop the courtyard and give the space an extraterrestrial vibe. Suspended from the canopy like stalactites are 250 tubular structures. A hundred robotically woven recycled spool stools are scattered throughout the courtyard like stalagmites. Related: Futuristic canopy made of knitted solar panels wins 2017 Young Architects Program at MoMA During the day, the canopy’s integrated misting system sprays water to cool visitors in hot weather. Lumen’s use of mist for cooling and its multicolored glowing backdrop at night creates a dynamic setting for the 20th season of Warm Up , MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series. MoMA PS1 writes: “Socially and environmentally responsive, Lumen’s adaptive architecture is inspired by collective levity, play, and interaction as the structure transforms throughout the day and night, responding to the density of bodies, heat, and sunlight. The result of collaboration across disciplines, Lumen applies insights and theories from biology, materials science, mathematics, and engineering—integrating high-performing, formfitting, and adaptive materials into a structure where code, pattern, human interaction, environment, geometry, and matter operate together.” + Jenny Sabin Studio Images by Pablo Enriquez

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Futuristic solar fabric canopy reacts to heat, sunlight, and movement

Futuristic canopy made of knitted textile solar panels wins 2017 Young Architects Program at MoMA

February 21, 2017 by  
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Since 2000, New York City’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) PS1 art gallery brings to life experimental outdoor installations every summer—and this year’s winning design is shaping up to be its most innovative project yet. Ithaca-based design practice Jenny Sabin Studio won the 2017 MoMA PS1’s Young Architecture Program competition with their proposal of a futuristic shelter made from robotically knitted textile solar panels. The project, called Lumen, is a “knitted light” structure that will immerse visitors in a cooling microclimate during the day and in an ethereal immersive environment at night that glows using energy collected from the sun. Now in its 18th edition, the Young Architects Program gives emerging architects and designers the chance to build a temporary outdoor installation in the MoMA PS1 courtyard in Long Island City. Proposals were required to provide shelter, seating, and water, while also addressing environmental issues that include sustainability and recycling. Jenny Sabin Studio’s winning Lumen will feature a robotically woven canopy made of recycled photoluminescent textiles that collect solar energy to produce light. Misting systems built into tubular structures called “fabric stalactites” will keep visitors cool during hot days. Related: First Ever Mushroom Tower Sprouts at MoMA PS1 in New York Initially developed for Nike, Lumen’s high-tech fabric canopy is a cross-disciplinary experiment that merges elements of architecture with biology, materials science, mathematics, and engineering. Jenny Sabin Studio writes: “The project is mathematically generated through form-finding simulations informed by the sun, site, materials, program, and the structural morphology of knitted cellular components. Resisting a biomimetic approach, Lumen employs an analogic design process where complex material behavior and processes are integrated with personal engagement and diverse programs. Lumen undertakes rigorous interdisciplinary experimentation to produce a multisensory environment that is full of delight, inspiring collective levity, play, and interaction as the structure and materials transform throughout the day and night.” Lumen will be open to the public at the MoMA PS1 courtyard on June 29, 2017 and will serve as the backdrop for Warm Up, the art gallery’s annual outdoor music series. + Jenny Sabin Studio Via Architectural Record Images via Jenny Sabin Studio

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Futuristic canopy made of knitted textile solar panels wins 2017 Young Architects Program at MoMA

Interlocking 3D-Printed Ceramic PolyBricks Snap Together Like Legos

August 11, 2014 by  
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We’ve seen 3D printing technology used for fabricating standardized building components, but now a team at Cornell has developed a way of making uniquely-shaped ceramic bricks that can be incorporated into the most complex structures. This new technique allows for the construction of entire buildings using a single material, and best of all, the system completely eliminates construction waste. Read the rest of Interlocking 3D-Printed Ceramic PolyBricks Snap Together Like Legos Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3D printed building components , 3D printing , 3D-Printed bricks , ceramic bricks , curved bricks , Jenny Sabin Studio , lightweight building material , PolyBricks architecture , PolyBricks Cornell , Sabin Design Lab , standardized building components

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Interlocking 3D-Printed Ceramic PolyBricks Snap Together Like Legos

Energy-Efficient and Airtight Leeuw House Requires Almost No Energy for Heating

August 11, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Energy-Efficient and Airtight Leeuw House Requires Almost No Energy for Heating Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , brussels , double height ceilings , energy efficient architecture , half levels , karel verdonck , leeuw house , minimize heat loss , NU architectuuratelier , open plan layout , passive house , Sint-Pieters-Leeuw , solar gain , triple glazed windows

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Energy-Efficient and Airtight Leeuw House Requires Almost No Energy for Heating

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