We Earthlings: The Carbon Footprint of Jeans

September 24, 2019 by  
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Jeans are a staple in most people’s wardrobes, something we … The post We Earthlings: The Carbon Footprint of Jeans appeared first on Earth911.com.

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We Earthlings: The Carbon Footprint of Jeans

Solving Systemic Water Problems

September 24, 2019 by  
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As Americans, we are conditioned to believe that our individual … The post Solving Systemic Water Problems appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Solving Systemic Water Problems

How I Collected 1,000 Cigarette Butts

September 24, 2019 by  
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I never smoked. I guess it’s because of the smell, … The post How I Collected 1,000 Cigarette Butts appeared first on Earth911.com.

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How I Collected 1,000 Cigarette Butts

How to mend and repair your clothes

May 14, 2019 by  
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There are many benefits to clothing repair. Fixing a hole in your favorite jeans or re-attaching a broken button can extend the life of the piece, which is better for the environment and your wallet. From hemming jean bottoms to fixing zippers, here is a quick look at all of the ways you can repair your own clothes . Sewing kit If you are serious about clothing repair, you should have a sewing kit on standby. A good kit includes items like needles and thread, scissors, a tape measure, a seam ripper, spare buttons and sewing pins. You can even put together a traveling sewing kit for whenever you are on the road and face a clothing emergency. Buttons Repairing a button on your favorite shirt can seem daunting at first, but it is actually a fairly straightforward process. According to The Spruce , there are two basic styles of buttons that are commonly used on shirts. The trick is picking the right type of button and the right size. Fortunately, you can usually reference other buttons on the shirt when selecting the perfect fit. The first type is called flat buttons. These are, well, flat and have exposed threads. These are the most commonly used buttons on shirts. The other type is called a shank button, which hides the thread. These are typically used in heavier pieces of clothing. Jean repairs Denim requires a substantial amount of water just to make one pair of jeans, so you should treat all of your jeans with care to keep them in top shape for many years. Rips Jeans often develop holes after extended use. Before you toss your favorite pair of pants, you can extend their life by repairing those rips and tears. All it takes is a patch of fabric  similar in color to the jeans and some thread. You can use a fusible patch, though you will likely need to sew it in place if you want it to last. Related: How to sew together ripped jeans Zippers Broken zippers are another common issue with jeans. Replacing a zipper is a little tricky, but it can be done. You will need a replacement zipper that matches the old fabric and some thread. Start by removing the old zipper entirely. Then, cut the new zipper to fit, and sew it in place. Belt loops Hardy belt loops are a requirement for a good pair of jeans , but they can fail after constant tugging. To repair a belt loop, you will need some denim thread, scrap fabric and a sewing machine. Start by patching the hole where the loop broke off. Once that is done, simply sew the old loop back into place, making sure you use plenty of thread to keep it strong. Mending Most clothing mends you will need to make are either for the seams or hems of your favorite clothes. Seam mending Seams are the most integral part of a piece of clothing . Seams can be curved or straight, or they can run into each other at intersections. The issue with seams is that they frequently rip, especially in areas you do not want exposed. Luckily, you can easily repair seams with some thread or by using fusible fabrics . Fusible alternatives remove the sewing element and are a great option for those less experienced in mending. There are a variety of fusible options on the market, so make sure you shop around for the right type before you start a project. Hem mending There are many reasons why people choose to hem clothing. The most common hem is done on jeans and helps prevent the bottoms from dragging on the ground. Jeans that are too long can trip people and will result in frayed ends. Hemming is also used to make pieces of clothing, like skirts, fit better and look more custom-made. Related: 11 ways to be more self-sufficient Common stitches By learning some simple, common stitches, you can easily repair a variety of fabrics. Running stitch If you only learn one sewing technique, it probably should be a running stitch. According to Life Hacker , the running stitch is a fundamental technique and one of the most basic stitches out there. By learning a running stitch, you can easily sew patches, fix hems and mend holes in clothing. This type of stitch basically runs in and out of the fabric without ever doubling back on itself. Back stitch A back stitch is basically a running stitch with a slight twist. This type of sewing technique is ideal if you need something that is both strong and flexible. This includes attaching zippers or fixing tears in fabrics in areas that take a lot of stress. When sewing a back stitch, you always take one step back with every stitch you make. This results in a line of thread on the backside of the item and a running stitch on the front. Whip stitch A whip stitch is slightly more advanced than the previous two techniques but still easy to perform. These stitches can repair torn seams, pockets that have come undone and split hems. A whip stitch is ideal whenever you are sewing two pieces of fabric together, like the opening of a pillow case. The threads will be visible in a whip stitch, so make sure you select a color that closely matches the original fabric. With these basic stitches and methods in mind, you are on your way to becoming an ace at basic clothing repair. Best of all, this will save you money and the planet’s resources. Images via Shutterstock

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How Figure-Hugging Jeans Nearly Created a Crisis With US Currency

February 2, 2014 by  
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Image via Shutterstock If you own a pair of jeans that fit so snugly that they can be confused for colored cling-wrap, chances are they contain a hefty amount of spandex. For the past twenty-odd years, Americans have been adding the synthetic fiber to denim to obtain that figure-hugging look. Unfortunately for the makers of US currency, that means they can now no longer use the waste fabric from jeans to create dollar bills. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: currency , denim , dollar bills , Fashion , jeans , skinny jeans , spandex , us currency        

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How Figure-Hugging Jeans Nearly Created a Crisis With US Currency

How can I reuse, recycle or revamp a rucksack/back pack?

August 31, 2011 by  
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We’ve kinda covered this already but Janette has such a specific question that I thought it was worth looking at it again: I have a backpack I would like to recycle and reuse. I have the straps and the part that goes against our back but would like to change the rest of it with reused fabric. Only the zipper doesn’t work right now but would like to change the whole outside pocket to add style. I have some random fabrics including jean material from old jeans. Could [use] the jean material for durability? Does anyone have any simple but fashionable patterns that fit what I have? It would be fun to do a quilted backpack (but I don’t have any quilted fabric yet). I don’t want to do a purse backpack just a normal one that can hold books and such. I’m trying to avoid buying anything so buying a zipper is out of the question. I have some other craft supplies but not extra zippers. Because I’m a bit lazy, I’d probably try to do the least possible sewing and start with something already roughly the right shape or with pockets. Very simply, I’ve seen the bottom of old jeans turned into backpacks (like in this video tutorial ) but depending on the size of the jeans, it may be more of a mini backpack (like in the video), which isn’t the sort of thing Janette wants. (Mine would be big enough to hold a few books, and even a folder if I didn’t make a closing flap at the top. Finally an advantage to having a bigger bum!) If you only have small jeans available, you could make them bigger by cutting up the fly, and using a different fabric for the back of the pack, and opening up the legs (as if you were making a skirt from jeans ) to make it longer. Another video makes a backpack from an old suit jacket – a lot of the jacket is cut away so you wouldn’t necessarily know it was from a jacket, but the useful pockets do remain. I’ve also seen skirts made into backpacks (although I can’t find any links now) and there are lots of tutorials on how to make a drawstring backpack from an old t-shirt out there. I don’t think any of those ideas will completely satisfy Janette’s requirements but they’ve certainly given me some ideas for non-zip closures: how about a velcro-ed flap like the suit jacket one? or buckles on straps (like old army packs), buttoned down flaps or a drawstring, possibly under a flap? I usually shy away from wikihow posts but there seems to be a decent tutorial on making a pack with the latter on there . Anyone got any advice, suggestions or tutorials for Janette?

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How can I reuse, recycle or revamp a rucksack/back pack?

Fab recycled projects: bird feeders, storage bags, pot racks & more

April 28, 2011 by  
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It’s been a few weeks since I shared some links so here are some of my favourite sightings and emails from the last month: First up, it has to be Scott’s coke can and chopsticks bird feeder – as always, a fab recycled item with very fun how-to instructions.

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Fab recycled projects: bird feeders, storage bags, pot racks & more

Recycle This turns five!

April 28, 2011 by  
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I mentioned on Twitter yesterday that it was Recycle This’s fifth birthday earlier this week – we launched on the 24th April 2006. In the intervening five years, I’ve published 1026 posts about reusing and recycling random stuff

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Recycle This turns five!

Reducing, reusing and recycling links round-up

January 18, 2011 by  
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It’s been a while since I did a round-up of some of my favourite reducing, reusing and recycling links so without further ado… I’m often amazed what fab things people can make from old toilet roll tubes and these are no exception – fake wrought iron artwork . A great idea – I’m going to make some for our porch, reflecting the curled wrought iron railings we’ve got at the front of the house

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Reducing, reusing and recycling links round-up

Levi’s New Jeans Design Cuts Water Use by 96 Percent

November 4, 2010 by  
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By making simple changes to the jeans finishing process, Levi’s has been able to dramatically reduce the water needed to produce each pair of jeans.

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Levi’s New Jeans Design Cuts Water Use by 96 Percent

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