Explore eerie wonders at the Museum of Underwater Art

June 16, 2020 by  
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Four years after its initial conception, Australia’s  Museum of Underwater Art  has finally opened to the public, becoming the first-ever underwater art museum in the Southern Hemisphere. Located off the coast of Townsville North Queensland in the central part of the Great Barrier Reef , the unique museum aims to strengthen the region’s position as a leader in reef conservation, restoration and education. World-famous underwater sculptor and environmentalist Jason deCaires Taylor conceptualized the first two installations — the Ocean Siren and Coral Greenhouse. As the inaugural sculpture of the Museum of Underwater Art, the Ocean Siren was conceived as an above-water beacon for raising awareness about  ocean conservation . The inspiration for the statue, as reported by CNBC, is 12-year-old Takoda Johnson, a “member of the local Wulgurukaba people, one of two traditional owners of the local land.” The sculpture reacts to live water temperature data from the Davies Reef weather station on the Great Barrier Reef by changing color depending on temperature variations.  Underwater and approximately 80 kilometers from shore, the John Brewer Reef “Coral Greenhouse” welcomes divers to the heart of the Greater Barrier Reef Marine Park with messages of reef conservation and restoration. The installation is the largest MOUA exhibit, weighing over 58 tons and filled with and surrounded by 20 “reef guardian” sculptures. All construction is made from stainless steel and pH-neutral materials to encourage  coral  growth. Related: This stunning underwater art museum is now open in the Maldives “MOUA offers a contemporary platform to share the stories of the reef, and the culture of its  First Nations  people, as well as spark a meaningful conversation and solution to reef conservation,” reads an MOUA press release emphasizing the museum’s many educational opportunities. The Ocean Siren and the Coral Greenhouse were completed as part of MOUA’s first phase; future installations include Palm Island and Magnetic Island. MOUA is estimated to generate over $42.1 million in annual economic output and create 182 jobs through the local tourism and conservation sectors. + Museum of Underwater Art Images via Jason deCaires Taylor

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Explore eerie wonders at the Museum of Underwater Art

This stunning underwater art museum is now open in the Maldives

August 2, 2018 by  
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British environmental artist Jason deCaires Taylor recently completed his latest work, and it’s his most stunning to date— The Sculpture Coralarium , presented as the world’s first semi-submerged tidal gallery space. Located in the middle of the Maldives’ largest developed coral lagoon at the island resort Fairmont Sirru Fen Fushi, the partially submerged art gallery is primarily experienced in the water and guests are invited to snorkel and swim their way to the installation. The museum’s human-like sculptures, built of marine-safe neutral-pH material, are designed to promote coral growth and provide additional marine habitat over time. The Sculpture Coralarium is the Maldives’ first underwater museum and took approximately five months to install. The artwork begins with a long swimming pool that transects the beach and leads to a coral-lined pathway submerged in the sea. The 100-meter walkway is “sea-scaped” with endemic planted corals and serves as the symbolic threshold to another world. An additional five- to ten-minute swim reveals a submerged staircase, which connects to a cuboid six-meter-tall building with stainless steel walls. The walls themselves have coral-inspired laser-cut openings to allow water and marine life to pass through. The front facade is typically submerged to a median tide of three meters. A series of Jesmonite human-like sculptures were placed on the roof of the cuboid structure, while over a dozen more sculptures can be found on plinths at various heights and submerged at differing degrees. The sculptures were made using casts of the local population and combined with organic coral and plant-inspired forms. The sculptures will promote the growth of coral reefs. Related: Artist Jason deCaires Taylor Builds an Incredible Coral Reef from Sunken Statues “The underwater realm of the installation includes a series of children looking up towards [the] surface of the sea. This poses questions about the threat of climate change and sea levels rising and the consequences for future generations,” reads the project statement. “Overall the installation aims to draw all the elements of life on earth together, to portray a system where all components are dependent on each other, humans and the environment in coexistence, a leveling of relationships. The Coralarium becomes a portal or interface to the wonders of the underwater world.” + Jason deCaires Taylor Images via Fairmont Maldives

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This stunning underwater art museum is now open in the Maldives

Tiny Heirloom unveils ‘The Goose’ a custom tiny home with stunning interiors

August 2, 2018 by  
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Once again, the genius design team from Tiny Heirloom has unveiled another spectacular tiny home . Built on a gooseneck trailer, The Goose offers a spacious tiny home on wheels that can sleep up to six people and comes with all of the amenities of a conventional home — just in a compact size. Starting at $84,995, The Goose comes in three sizes and can be customized in various ways or, as the designers put it, you can “Build Your Goose.” Future homeowners can choose from a number of options in order to meet their specific tiny home needs, starting at the length of the home, which can be 27, 30 or 34 feet. The living area comes standard at 8 feet by 13.5 feet. Related: Rock climbing walls cover this tiny home built for adventure lovers The exterior of the home is inspired by a modern farmhouse aesthetic, with white cladding and a wooden front porch. Although the home is installed with LED lighting , the interior is well-lit during the day with an abundance of natural light. An all-white interior with multiple windows and optional skylights emits a fresh, healthy aesthetic. The design allows for a beautifully open space that is enhanced by exposed wooden beams crossing the vaulted ceiling. The tiny home’s layout puts the living room on one side and a separate master bedroom on the opposite side, elevated by a set of stairs. A large cook’s kitchen is equipped with modern appliances and has a fold-out table for dining. The Goose’s full-size bathroom puts the closet-like bathrooms typically found in tiny houses to shame. One of the best aspects of the tiny home is that it comes with various options to customize the space, including extras like additional closets and storage. For larger families looking to make the most out of the space, two additional sleeping lofts can be added. Extra amenities like an in-wall electric heater and a composting toilet are also available. + Tiny Heirloom Via New Atlas Images via Tiny Heirloom

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Tiny Heirloom unveils ‘The Goose’ a custom tiny home with stunning interiors

Invader Tags Jason deCaires Taylor’s Underwater Reef Sculptures With 8-Bit Mosaic Graffiti

October 5, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Invader Tags Jason deCaires Taylor’s Underwater Reef Sculptures With 8-Bit Mosaic Graffiti Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: artificial reef , Bay of Cancun , eco design , green design , Invader , jason decaires taylor , mosaic graffiti , space invaders , Street art , sustainable design , underwater sculpture

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Invader Tags Jason deCaires Taylor’s Underwater Reef Sculptures With 8-Bit Mosaic Graffiti

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