Hundreds of radioactive wild boars run amok in Fukushima, Japan

March 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Hundreds of radioactive wild boars run amok in Fukushima, Japan

Packs of radioactive wild boars are running loose in northern Japan, where the meltdown of the Fukushima nuclear plant in 2011 forced entire towns and villages to abandon ship. Six years later, the beasts pose more than a minor nuisance to displaced residents, a number of whom are eager to return to their homes as the Japanese government begins to lift evacuation orders in certain areas. Besides their obvious toxicity—tests by officials show that some animals possess levels of cesium-137 300 times higher than what is considered safe—the boars are also known to attack humans. Swaths of farmland, now gone to seed, have become prime real estate for foraging varmints. According to Yomiuri , a local newspaper, boars have caused more than $854,000 in agricultural damage in Fukushima prefecture. Local authorities in the affected towns have hired teams of hunters to shoot the boars with air rifles, or trap them in cages using rice flour as bait. Related: Fukushima radiation levels at highest since 2011 disaster “After people left, they began coming down from the mountains and now they are not going back,” Shoichiro Sakamoto, who leads a group of 13 hunters in the town of Tomioka, told Reuters . “They found a place that was comfortable. There was plenty of food and no one to come after them.” A recent government survey found than half the 21,500 former residents of the town of Namie, one of the towns included in the proposed evacuation-order lift, have decided against returning, citing fears over the safety of the nuclear plant, which will take decades to dismantle. Several have also raised concerns about the bands of marauding boars. “I’m sure officials at all levels are giving some thought to this,” said Hidezo Sato, a former seed merchant in Namie. “Something must be done.” Via Reuters Image via Wikipedia

See more here: 
Hundreds of radioactive wild boars run amok in Fukushima, Japan

RiverBlue: Jason Priestley-narrated documentary exposes the dark side of your blue jeans

March 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on RiverBlue: Jason Priestley-narrated documentary exposes the dark side of your blue jeans

Are your clothes causing the world’s rivers to bleed blue? Directed by David McIlvride and Roger Williams and narrated by Jason Priestley, RiverBlue is a new documentary that delves deep into the shocking underbelly of fast fashion to expose its destructive and widespread impacts on our environment. For those of you in New York City, Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator will be hosting a screening of this powerful film on March 22 for World Water Day . Read on for more details about the screening and post-film discussion with Williams and Paul Gallay, President of Riverkeeper, and learn more about the movie by checking out BF+DA’s interview with McIlvride here . RiverBlue follows acclaimed river conservationist Mark Angelo on a waterborne trip around the world to uncover the truth behind the garment industry and its effects on the Earth’s waterways and ecosystems. Infiltrating one of the world’s most pollutive industries, and speaking with fashion designers and water protectors world-wide, RiverBlue reveals stunning yet, shocking images that will forever change the way we look at fashion, and the impact of the clothes we wear. – Brooklyn Fashion and Design Accelerator BF+DA will be screening RiverBlue on Wednesday, March 22 from 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm. Tickets are $10. Click here for more details and to RSVP. + RSVP to see RiverBlue here

Read the original here:
RiverBlue: Jason Priestley-narrated documentary exposes the dark side of your blue jeans

Architect tops Japanese community center with a series of striking wooden roofs

March 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Architect tops Japanese community center with a series of striking wooden roofs

Hiroshima-based architect Hiroshi Sambuichi has covered a cultural center in the small Japanese island of Naoshima with a series of strikingly beautiful wooden roofs . Much of the design of the complex is based on traditional Japanese architecture – including the low-rise hipped roofs, which strategically provide fresh air circulation throughout the buildings. The complex is comprised of multiple buildings that share a series of wooden roofs . The largest roof covers the main volume of the community hall, which is built into a grassy slope. Made out of multi-tonal Japanese cypress or “hinoki,” the massive roof follows the low incline of the landscape. A large triangular opening is carved into its apex, which lets additional fresh air into the interior. Related: Kengo Kuma’s new community center hides a hilly indoor landscape under its zigzag-roof The two roofs cover four buildings underneath, which have multiple indoor and outdoor spaces – another feature that pays homage to traditional Japanese architecture . “A structure that provides protection from rain while allowing breezes to gently pass through, it inherits the principles of the Japanese traditional thatched roof,” said Sambuichi. Inside, natural materials create a simple and elegant atmosphere. The flooring is made from Hinoki panels, some of the walls are made out of adobe clay, and some rooms have compacted earth flooring made from a leftover solution from a local salt factory. The complex also has a number of typical Japanese tatami rooms, which were laid out to receive optimal air circulation. “Emulating the traditional layouts found in Naoshima, gardens and verandas are placed at the north and south, so that breezes will pass through the tatami rooms,” said the architect. To further cool the interior spaces in the hot summer months, an innovative system feeds underground water into pipes in the community center’s ceiling. Via Dezeen Photography by Sambuichi Architects

See more here: 
Architect tops Japanese community center with a series of striking wooden roofs

Twin live and work cubes demonstrate superior material and spatial economy

December 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Twin live and work cubes demonstrate superior material and spatial economy

If you’ve ever dreamed of shortening your commute to mere steps, take a look at this brilliant project in the Czech Republic. Petr Stolin was commissioned to design two identical buildings using structural insulated panels (SIPs) – one for living, and one for working. The corresponding design, called Zen Houses, demonstrates a flair for spatial and material economy without compromising on style. Located in a rural landscape outside Liberec, the double-story cubes, which are just 10 meters wide, are clad in transparent acrylic sheets that reveal simple timber framing and surprisingly voluminous interiors. The two buildings, which lie side-by-side, were constructed with a variety of low-budget materials that give them something of a shabby chic aesthetic, including chipboard, plywood, wooden beams, raw metal and rubber. The cubic buildings are connected by a simple walkway and create a series of public, semi-public and private areas between them. They are carefully designed to frame views of the surrounding landscape, while ensuring plenty of natural light reaches the interiors. Related: Green live / work space is a modern update to the vernacular barn The interior of the studio half of the duplex is finished in white, while the residential building is finished in black – providing a subtle distinction between the two. Each building has a half-mezzanine, which increases the interior volume and living space. Its minimalism was inspired by Japanese design . “The experimental character of the houses was the conceptual starting point,” the architects write in their design brief. “Yet the deliberate austerity of the achieved forms definitely brings new lifestyle qualities to an environment built in this way.” + Petr Stolin Architekt

Originally posted here:
Twin live and work cubes demonstrate superior material and spatial economy

Gorgeous net-zero energy home offers luxury living in Washington, D.C.

December 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Gorgeous net-zero energy home offers luxury living in Washington, D.C.

A leafy and sought-after neighborhood in Northwest Washington, D.C. hides a luxurious gem of a home with a net-zero energy footprint. The local architecture office of Robert M. Gurney designed the contemporary residence, named the Brandywine House, with light-filled interiors and a natural palette that includes high-end materials like zebra wood, granite, and Santos mahogany. Despite its large size, the carefully constructed home is respectful of the scale of its neighboring homes and is incredibly energy efficient. Located just a stone’s throw away from the Smithsonian National Zoo and the high-end shops of Connecticut Avenue, the three-story Brandywine House enjoys the conveniences and benefits of city living, while still preserving privacy and a tranquil environment. The architects retained the majority of mature trees on site and installed a lush planting plan that separates the home from the street. The building’s boxy exterior is composed of traditional and natural materials , like stone, wood, and stucco, to help the building recede into its green surroundings. Carefully placed windows on the street-facing facade ensure privacy. Related: Stunning energy-smart home near D.C. looks like a super swanky Tetris ensemble While the street-facing facade is mostly closed off, floor-to-ceiling glazing wraps around the other sides of the home to bring in ample amounts of natural light and views of the wooded landscape beyond. Arranged in an “L” shape, the house wraps around outdoor living spaces, a swimming pool, and the large, south-facing rear yard. The light-filled interior is modern and cozy, featuring a diverse palette of different timbers—all forest-certified or reconstituted—and stones like limestone and granites, that complement the white-painted walls. To achieve net-zero energy over a calendar year, the daylit house is equipped with computer-programmed shading devices to mitigate solar gain, a geothermal HVAC system with hydronic heating, solar hot water tubes, and photovoltaic panels. + Robert M. Gurney Architect Images © Anice Hoachlander

Originally posted here:
Gorgeous net-zero energy home offers luxury living in Washington, D.C.

US veterans who protested DAPL are fighting a new fight

December 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on US veterans who protested DAPL are fighting a new fight

Last week, thousands of American veterans descended on Standing Rock to defend the anti-pipeline protesters from police brutality. Now that the news has been handed down that the US Army is blocking the pipeline (at least for the time being), the veteran’s group is on the move once again. Their next stop ? Flint, Michigan, where residents are still struggling with a lack of access to clean water. In early 2014, the city of Flint switched its water source from Detroit’s utility system to the polluted Flint River, without adding the anti-corrosion agents needed to keep the water safe. The new water ate away at the city’s pipes, causing lead to leach into the water of homes and schools through the area for nearly a year before the city alerted residents to the problem. Despite a national spotlight, the water crisis still hasn’t been resolved. In fact, the state of Michigan seems to be doing all it can to avoid delivering fresh drinking water to residents in the meantime. A federal judge recently ordered state officials to oversee deliveries of bottled water to all affected homes in Flint to help residents avoid exposure to dangerous levels of contaminants. However, the state has appealed the ruling and is apparently defying the order. Those in affected homes can still pick up bottled water from state-run distribution centers and call to request a personal delivery if needed. Related: 6 Michigan state workers charged with misconduct over the Flint Water Crisis There’s no set date for the veterans’ trip to Flint yet, but if it’s anything like the Standing Rock campaign, it’s likely to be an impressive effort. In the end, supporters donated more than $1.1 million on GoFundMe to help send more than 4,000 veterans to the reservation. Via The Independent Images via Wise Woman Rising , Kelly Kolisnik , and Ruth Hopkins

Read the original post: 
US veterans who protested DAPL are fighting a new fight

Fierce public backlash erupts over Japanese skating rink full of frozen fish

November 28, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Fierce public backlash erupts over Japanese skating rink full of frozen fish

Officials at Space World , a Japanese theme park, issued a plea for forgiveness over the weekend, after public backlash forced them to close a skating rink that featured all sorts of sea creatures frozen into the ice . Some 5,000 fish, crabs, and other sea creatures were frozen into the skating rink as part of an attraction dubbed “Freezing Port,” but the public was quick to respond with disgust. Park officials said in their public apology that they were “shocked” by the public’s reaction, and the rink was closed by Sunday evening after a two-week run. Space World manager Toshimi Takeda talked to CNN about the so-called “world first” skating rink attraction. “We were shocked to hear the reaction as the ice skate rink was very popular since it opened two weeks ago, we had an unprecedented number of visitors,” Takeda said. “(But) we had endless opinions about the project, we were shocked … We are sorry for the project and decided to close the rink on that night.” Related: Japanese paper artist replicates amazing wild animals using intricately bound newspaper The fish and other marine creatures frozen into the skating rink were reportedly already dead before being installed in the rink, according to Takeda, who told CNN they were purchased from a local fish market. Now, theme park workers are tasked with removing the fish from the ice, holding an “appropriate religious service” and then reusing the carcasses as fertilizer. Although “Freezing Port” had been open for two weeks, it took news of the macabre attraction hitting social media on Saturday to ignite the public backlash that eventually closed the morbid skating rink. Users of Facebook and Twitter bashed the theme park for the move, and Space World officials were quick to reach a decision to close the attraction on Sunday. Swiftly following that announcement, theme park officials deleted all mentions and photos of the gruesome ice show from its Facebook page. Via CNN Images via Space World

Read more here:
Fierce public backlash erupts over Japanese skating rink full of frozen fish

Kengo Kuma’s ultra-minimalist trailer is the perfect shell for your nomadic adventures

October 14, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Kengo Kuma’s ultra-minimalist trailer is the perfect shell for your nomadic adventures

Snow Peak is a Japan-based maker of technical outdoor gear founded in 1958. Now a global retailer with two stores in the US, the company produces everything from nearly indestructible titanium mugs and utensils to stoves, tents, and even camping furniture. All of their pieces are thoughtfully designed with real-world use in mind, but Kengo Kuma’s tiny minimalist trailer takes the cake (or, perhaps more appropriately for the camping crowd, the s’more). Related: Top eco-friendly camping gear for conscientious outdoor enthusiasts The trailer ’s walls are lined in raw plywood, mimicking the bare bones functionality of the tatami mats found in traditional Japanese homes. The tiny portable shelter has a few clever features integrated into its design, which other trailer makers should heed post-haste. When closed up in traveling mode, the trailer is a sheltered box, but when parked at camp , its window and door coverings become awnings and tables, creating much-needed usable surfaces without requiring extra pieces of furniture. Beyond that, the trailer is a blank canvas to be utilized in whatever way its owners see fit. The renowned architect’s unique trailer is available for purchase from Snow Peak for $33,800 (3.5 million yen), tax excluded, for a basic model. A tiny shelter on wheels with LEDs and a bed platform will cost a little more. Right now, sales are limited to those within the company, but the retailer said general sales will be offered next spring. + Kengo Kuma and Associates + Snow Peak Via Treehugger Images via Kengo Kuma and Associates

Original post:
Kengo Kuma’s ultra-minimalist trailer is the perfect shell for your nomadic adventures

Friendly dolphin befriends children in the Baltic Sea

September 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Friendly dolphin befriends children in the Baltic Sea

A dolphin described as ” friendly ” and ” lonely ” appears to be engaging swimmers in the Baltic Sea close to Kiel, Germany . The dolphin’s behavior has led many to think it wants to play with children swimming in the sea. While it’s not yet known exactly where the dolphin came from, researchers think it could have been washed into the inlet during 2014 winter storms. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=33&v=3UZl4l9UycE https://twitter.com/TheLocalGermany/status/775619334676815872 According to The Guardian, “hundreds of children” have now splashed around with the dolphin, who has allowed the children to hug it and even seems to pull them through the water on rides. It has also been seen nudging children, as if asking them to play, according to onlookers. Related: This friendly fish has visited a Japanese diver for 25 years Marine scientist Boris Culik told German publication Kieler Nachrichten ( translated by The Local Germany ), “It’s not normal that a dolphin trusts humans so much. But one does find dolphins who seek human company. Perhaps he is just lonely.” https://twitter.com/karlaline/status/775658005325045761 While many have swum out in the sea to touch the dolphin, the local police say too many people at once could overwhelm the dolphin. Culik said human hands carry germs the dolphin may not be able to handle. The dolphin has also been swimming through locks, and police are asking people to not swim too close to the locks. The Waterways and Shipping Office’s Mathias Visser told The Guardian the dolphin has been “merrily making its way in and out of the sluice” and “gives the impression that it’s in a good way.” The Institute for Baltic Sea Research told The Guardian the dolphin likely arrived in the inlet when storms swept water from the North Sea into the Baltic Sea. Via The Guardian Image via Reinhard Link on Flickr

Read more here:
Friendly dolphin befriends children in the Baltic Sea

Kengo Kuma’s "floating kitchen" uses Chinese dishes to support the shelves

August 23, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Kengo Kuma’s "floating kitchen" uses Chinese dishes to support the shelves

Beijing Centre for the Arts ‘ founder Weng Ling commissioned Kuma to create a unique kitchen design. So he came up with an assorted range of kitchenware supporting the kitchen’s shelving structure, instead of the other way around. The Floating Kitchen includes ceramic bowls and plates, wooden boxes, vases, woks, wicker baskets, pots are pans, all from Chengdu in China. All these elements are used to create kitchen worktops and shelves at different heights to form the self-standing structure.  Kuma described the installation as an assemblage of “structuralism objects – a primitive condition where objects come in indirect contact with people, and only the intensive aggregation and flow of those objects stand out in relief.” The Kitchen Home Project also includes works by Dutch studio MVRDV and media artist Au Yeung Ying Chai and is on show at the Ca’ Tron palazzo until the September 30, 2016. + Kengo Kuma Via Dezeen Photos by Julien Lanoo

Read the original:
Kengo Kuma’s "floating kitchen" uses Chinese dishes to support the shelves

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2418 access attempts in the last 7 days.