Ryuji Kajino converts an 80-year-old barn into a gorgeous atelier

June 12, 2018 by  
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Architect Ryuji Kajino from Malubishi Architects has just unveiled the Tiny Atelier — a one-room work studio crafted with the remnants of an 80-year-old timber barn that previously stood on the same site. The minimalist work space, which was created for a designer who makes accessories from dried flowers, was built with timber, old beams and roof tiles repurposed from the existing barn. Located in Kurashiki, Japan, the work space was built for a designer who lives on a hilltop lot that overlooks the Seto Inland Sea in the distance. A covered porch leads from her home to the new studio, which is surrounded by greenery. In fact, the artist grows the flowers for her accessories in the onsite garden. Related: The Cornelia tiny house is a peaceful writer’s studio built with reclaimed wood The architect wanted to retain as many of the materials from the old barn as possible. The structure includes a new pitched roof topped with tiles from the existing barn. Inside, exposed log beams on the timber-lined ceiling pay homage to the former building. Vertical wooden boards  clad the petite studio, except for the front door, which has a diagonal pattern and custom-made chestnut handle. Large windows provide an abundance of natural light as well as beautiful views of the valley below. The room’s biggest window sits in a timber frame constructed with both old and new wooden pillars, again marking the transition from past to present. The office design embraces minimalism with sparse furniture and a wraparound white shelf built high up on the wall to provide space for drying flowers. According to the architect, re-using the barn’s old materials enabled him to create the atelier space as a nod to the local history. “Utilizing the materials that can be used by existing barns, we inherited the history that this site had been walking on,” explained Kajino, “but also aimed at a new architecture mixed old and new materials as a future architectural building.” + Ryuji Kajino Via Dezeen Images via Ryuji Kajino

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Ryuji Kajino converts an 80-year-old barn into a gorgeous atelier

Croatia Pavilions Cloud Pergola is one of the worlds largest 3D-printed structures

June 12, 2018 by  
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Architect Bruno Juri?i?  has unveiled one of the world’s largest and most complex 3D-printed structures at the 16th Venice Architecture Biennale . Dubbed the Cloud Pergola / The Architecture of Hospitality, this massive, site-specific structure for the Croatian Pavilion features 300 kilograms of 3D-printed biodegradable plastic. The immersive cloud-like installation invites visitors to reflect on the topics of hospitality, climate change and sociability. The Cloud Pergola is a contemporary take on the classic Mediterranean pergola structure, a space where “the private and public merge.” Curated and authored by Bruno Juri?i? in collaboration with Arup , Ai-Build and Alisa Andrašek, the innovative pavilion’s main focus is the ‘Cloud Drawing,’ a 3D-printed structure built of voxels arranged in a fluid-like mass using over 100,000 extruded elements. A “multi-agent algorithm” that was built with data on cloud formation and site-specific environmental data was used to inform the design’s lattice-like form and arrangement. The Cloud Pergola is complemented with artwork that helps create an immersive experience. Vlatka Horvat’s wall-based work ‘To Still the Eye’ explores the “notion of horizon as a physical manifestation of distance and as a metaphor for the future, wanting to address this sense of possibility,” while artist Maja Kuzmanovi?’s ‘Ephemeral Garden’ is an audio installation. “I wanted the pavilion to push the boundaries of the aesthetics, spatial and tectonic consequences of emerging paradigms of augmented intelligence at the cross-over between architecture, art, and engineering by presenting a full-scale pergola structure made using 3D robotic fabrication and automated design protocols,” said Bruno Juri?i? in a statement. “The Cloud Pergola was envisioned as a paradigm for what architecture should stand for in the 21st century.” Related: Vatican City’s first-ever pavilion debuts at the Venice Architecture Biennale Arup and the 3D manufacturing team of Ai-Build also developed a simple assembly sequence for the Cloud Pergola, which will be put on tour after the end of the Venice Biennale. The Croatian Pavilion will be exhibited for the entire duration of the Architectural Biennale, until November 25, 2018. + Croatian Pavilion Images by Jan Stojkovic

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Croatia Pavilions Cloud Pergola is one of the worlds largest 3D-printed structures

These fish and meat options are the most environmentally costly

June 12, 2018 by  
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Farmed seafood, wild-caught fish , or livestock : which one is the most environmentally costly to produce? A University of Washington -led study probed that question by scrutinizing 148 life-cycle assessments for animal protein production. Lead author Ray Hilborn, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences professor, said in a statement , “If you’re an environmentalist, what you eat makes a difference. We found there are obvious good choices, and really obvious bad choices.” (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v3.0’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); The environmental costs of producing meat, seafood Which food type is more environmentally costly to produce — livestock, farmed seafood, or wild-caught fish? New research from the University of Washington takes a comprehensive look at the environmental impacts of different types of animal protein production. Read more: http://www.washington.edu/news/2018/06/11/choice-matters-the-environmental-costs-of-producing-meat-seafood/ Posted by University of Washington News on Monday, June 11, 2018 Scientists drew on four metrics to compare environmental impacts of different animal proteins: greenhouse gas emissions , energy use, potential to add excess nutrients like fertilizer into the environment, and potential to emit substances that help cause  acid rain . They used 40 grams of protein — around the size of an average burger patty — as their standard amount . Related: Vegan diets deliver more environmental benefits than sustainable dairy or meat Industrial beef production and farmed catfish were the most environmentally costly in general, according to the university. Farmed mollusks such as scallops, oysters, or mussels and small wild-caught fish were the least environmentally costly. The university said capture fish choices like pollock, the cod family, and hake also have relatively low impact, and farmed salmon performed well. But there were differences across animal proteins — for example, the researchers said livestock production consumed less power than most seafood aquaculture as continual water circulation uses up electricity. Farmed tilapia, shrimp, and catfish used the most energy. Beef and catfish aquaculture generated around 20 times more greenhouse gases than chicken , farmed salmon, farmed mollusks, and small capture fisheries. “When compared to other studies of vegetarian and vegan diets, a selective diet of aquaculture and wild capture fisheries has a lower environmental impact than either of the plant-based diets,” according to the university. The journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment published the study this week. Four University of Washington scientists and one scientist from company Avalerion Capital contributed. + University of Washington + Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Images via

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These fish and meat options are the most environmentally costly

New study suggests that plastic waste may be transformed into usable energy

June 12, 2018 by  
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A new study from the Earth Engineering Center (EEC|CCNY) at the Grove School of Engineering of the City College of New York suggests that plastic waste can effectively be converted into usable fuel and energy rather than being dumped in a landfill or polluting the ocean. Researchers found that the addition of non-recycled plastics (NRPs) to a chemical recycling process known as gasification results in the production of crude oil -based fuel. It also reduces pollution, both plastic and emissions, in contrast to traditional methods of disposing of plastic waste, such as incineration or dumping. Plastic is a product derived from crude oil and, as such, contains significant latent energy that can be harnessed using the right technology and technique. “This study demonstrates that because carbon- and hydrogen -rich plastics have high energy content, there is tremendous potential to use technologies like gasification to convert these materials into fuels, chemicals and other products,” study co-author Marco J. Castaldi told Phys.org . As concerns rise over plastic pollution, scientists are looking to reframe plastic as a resource rather than waste . “Plastics have an end-of-life use that will be turning waste into energy, which is something we all need and use,” study co-author Demetra Tsiamis told Phys.org. Related: UN releases first “state of plastics” report on World Environment Day Gasification uses air or steam to heat plastic waste. This results in the creation of industrial gas mixtures called synthesis gas, or syngas. This syngas can either be converted into diesel and petrol or burned directly to generate electricity . This process is preferable to incineration of plastic waste because it allows for the storage of potentially usable energy that otherwise would be wasted through incineration. Gasification is also better for air quality, producing much lower levels of sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions. + Earth Engineering Center Via Phys.org Images via Depositphotos (1, 2)

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New study suggests that plastic waste may be transformed into usable energy

Japanese home features a bookshelf wall designed to withstand earthquakes

April 4, 2018 by  
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In earthquake-prone Japan , a wall full of books might seem like a disaster waiting to happen. Rather than capitulate to Mother Nature however, the owners of this Yokohama home found a way to safely put their massive library of books on full display without fear of collapse. Shinsuke Fujii Architects designed the Bookshelf House that features angled earthquake-resistant bookshelves easily accessible by children and the elderly without a ladder. Slotted in a dense Yokohama neighborhood, the roughly 930-square-foot Bookshelf House stands out from its neighbors with its black oblique walls clad in standing seam metal and set atop a concrete base. The slanted wall also helps shield the recessed entrance from rain. For privacy, windows are minimized, particularly on the lower levels. In contrast to its dark exterior, the interior is lined in light-colored timber. The front of the home is filled with natural light and features a sunken dining area next to the bookshelf wall, the kitchen, and pantry. The master bedroom and bathroom are placed at the rear of the home. Stairs lead up to a living room and small office space as well as a secondary bedroom and small glass-walled terrace . Related: House in Byoubuguara Uses Curved Floors to Maximize a Small Footprint in Japan “The horizontal shelf functions to prevent buckling of 4 m long pillars,” wrote the architects. “From the viewpoint of a safe bookshelf, a new relationship of housing – structure – bookshelf has been created.” + Shinsuke Fujii Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Tsukui Teruaki

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Japanese home features a bookshelf wall designed to withstand earthquakes

BIG unveils designs for LEED-certified skyscraper in NYC

April 4, 2018 by  
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A new LEED -seeking glass skyscraper is set to rise in Midtown Manhattan, with designs courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group . New York YIMBY got the scoop on the first renderings, showing an immense office tower wrapped in glass curtain wall and landscaped terraces. Located on 3 West 29th Street, the building has been dubbed “29th and 5th” and will replace the old Bancroft Bank Building that was demolished a few years ago. As reported by New York YIMBY, the “29th and 5th” project will target LEED certification and offer generous amenities for office workers. Although the September 2017 Department of Buildings application for the project reportedly specified a 551-foot envelope with 34 stories, the renderings look nearly double that size. Related: BIG unveils designs for bow tie-shaped National Theater of Albania “The building will incorporate a LEED certified design and highly amenitized offering package promoting employee connectivity, communal workspaces, and fitness options that will pioneer a new frontier of wellness and sustainability within the workplace,” says a 29th and 5th project description. “The building is designed with smaller 13,400 square foot floorplates that will attract an underserved market while leaving ample lot area to design a vibrant park surrounding the building.” + Bjarke Ingels Group Via New York YIMBY Images via New York YIMBY , by Bjarke Ingels Group

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BIG unveils designs for LEED-certified skyscraper in NYC

Architect tops Japanese community center with a series of striking wooden roofs

March 3, 2017 by  
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Hiroshima-based architect Hiroshi Sambuichi has covered a cultural center in the small Japanese island of Naoshima with a series of strikingly beautiful wooden roofs . Much of the design of the complex is based on traditional Japanese architecture – including the low-rise hipped roofs, which strategically provide fresh air circulation throughout the buildings. The complex is comprised of multiple buildings that share a series of wooden roofs . The largest roof covers the main volume of the community hall, which is built into a grassy slope. Made out of multi-tonal Japanese cypress or “hinoki,” the massive roof follows the low incline of the landscape. A large triangular opening is carved into its apex, which lets additional fresh air into the interior. Related: Kengo Kuma’s new community center hides a hilly indoor landscape under its zigzag-roof The two roofs cover four buildings underneath, which have multiple indoor and outdoor spaces – another feature that pays homage to traditional Japanese architecture . “A structure that provides protection from rain while allowing breezes to gently pass through, it inherits the principles of the Japanese traditional thatched roof,” said Sambuichi. Inside, natural materials create a simple and elegant atmosphere. The flooring is made from Hinoki panels, some of the walls are made out of adobe clay, and some rooms have compacted earth flooring made from a leftover solution from a local salt factory. The complex also has a number of typical Japanese tatami rooms, which were laid out to receive optimal air circulation. “Emulating the traditional layouts found in Naoshima, gardens and verandas are placed at the north and south, so that breezes will pass through the tatami rooms,” said the architect. To further cool the interior spaces in the hot summer months, an innovative system feeds underground water into pipes in the community center’s ceiling. Via Dezeen Photography by Sambuichi Architects

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Architect tops Japanese community center with a series of striking wooden roofs

How shared space makes four micro apartments in Japan seem much larger

November 30, 2016 by  
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Sometimes, size really doesn’t matter. Designed by Osamu Nishida and Erika Nakagawa from ON Design & Partners , the Yokohama Apartment complex features four micro residential units measuring around 215 square feet each. Despite such reduced dimensions, clever design ensures the small spaces feel expansive and livable. Magic especially resides in a shared open-air courtyard conceived as a living-room and a kitchen that doubles as an art gallery for the four artists living upstairs. With 1636 square feet of total floor area, the Yokohama Apartment building is subdivided into two levels. The common space on the ground level is canopied by the private residential floor, which is cut into four parts, and each unit has its own access coming up from the ground floor. Twisted stairs provide access without compromising tenants’ privacy. The ground floor is a covered open air piazza that provides common and private storage rooms, a micro kitchen unit and a dining room. This area is used for exhibitions, workshops, presentations, debates and other art activities. Related: Slice of the City home in Japan uses bold angles to solve tricky space restrictions Yokohama Apartment comprises brilliant Japanese design that maximizes every single inch. Unfortunately, this great invention mirrors a turning point in Japanese society, whereby poverty and unemployment, particularly among young people, forces innovation. Sharing space offers a bright alternative to the small and introverted dwellings common in Japan today. This societal concern was raised by Yoshiyuki Yamana, the curator of the Japanese Pavilion at the Venice Biennale of Architecture earlier this year ; he chose the Yokohama Apartment project as an example of how to successfully adapt to the country’s new social condition . + ON Design & Partners + Venice Biennale Images via Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat

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North Dakota will fine pipeline protesters $1000 for bringing in food and supplies

November 30, 2016 by  
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In an effort to suppress the ongoing Dakota Access Pipeline protests at Standing Rock, North Dakota officials have threatened hefty fines on anyone bringing “prohibited items” into the area – including portable bathrooms, building materials, and even food. This follows an “ emergency evacuation ” order issued by state Governor Jack Dalrymple on Monday. While the evacuation was supposedly due to incoming snowstorms, protesters believe it’s simply an attempt by the state to circumvent federal authority and intimidate activists. The governor’s office initially planned to set up a physical blockade to prevent people from reaching the camp, however, it has since softened its approach. Instead, law enforcement officers will stop vehicles attempting to enter the camp and inform drivers that they could be subject to a $1,000 fine for entering the evacuation zone. Organizers at the camp allege that the order is simply an attempt to bully the protesters, and it’s a difficult point to argue – law enforcement officials certainly didn’t seem to worry about exposing the self-proclaimed “ water protectors ” from the elements earlier this month when they sprayed them with water cannons in sub-freezing weather conditions . In fact, this week injured protesters filed a class action lawsuit alleging that the police gave no warnings before violently attempting to disperse the protests. Related: Hundreds of Dakota Access Pipeline protesters injured by police attacks at Standing Rock While the state of North Dakota has asked for help from federal law enforcement to remove the demonstrators from the evacuation zone by December 5th, the Army Corps issued a statement on Monday that it would not be forcibly removing people from the land. However, emergency services to the camp will be restricted, based on approval from the county sheriff and highway patrol – a potentially dangerous action if the police should clash with the protesters again. Via Reuters Images via   Standing Rock Rising

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North Dakota will fine pipeline protesters $1000 for bringing in food and supplies

High-tech Louis Vuitton building lights up like a giant lantern at night

November 3, 2016 by  
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Although the façade of the maison’s flagship store in Ginza appears as a deep multi-layered structure, in reality it is made of two layers of 5mm-thick modular aluminum panels. Characteristic star- and funnel-shaped elements are produced in five different sizes and clad the entire building. The LED lamps hidden behind the star panels are integrated in the funnel plates and further accentuate the three-dimensional impact of the building’s skin. The innovative bumpy LV façade is a great low-tech device that is also capable of capturing and reflecting the ever-changing ambient light. Thanks to the relief shape and the pearl paint finish, the iconic new Ginza store is equally appealing during the day. This breakthrough design developed by Jun Aoki for his regular client is the result of restrictions the architect had to follow during the renovation of an earlier project. During reconstruction, the steel structure that supported the previous building envelope had to be maintained such that the new skin could be no thinner than 24 cm and its weight had to stay below 40 kg/2. Related: Jun Aoki Hides Omiyamae Gymnasium Underground to Create a Green Oasis for Suginami, Tokyo This beautiful building illustrates why this is the eighth project Aoki has completed for the Louis Vuitton company, including one in Hong-Kong and New York City . Each provides a new and fresh interpretation of the classic chessboard pattern applied to the scale of architecture. + Jun Aoki Images via Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat

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High-tech Louis Vuitton building lights up like a giant lantern at night

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