The Science Place becomes Australias first new LEED Gold-rated educational building

April 24, 2018 by  
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James Cook University’s The Science Place recently earned the distinction of becoming Australia’s first educational building to achieve a prestigious LEED Gold rating. Designed by HASSELL , the sustainable building with state-of-the-art facilities brings together the university’s chemistry, biochemistry and biology research cohorts under one roof. The Science Place also recovered and recycled 96% of all the previous building materials—a new record for a Townsville development of its size. The nearly 130,000-square-foot The Science Place building serves as the iconic “home of science” and central hub on the university campus. The four-story structure stacks two floors of dedicated scientific research areas atop research-led learning spaces on the lower two floors, all linked by light-filled atrium spaces and a central open stair. “We’ve seen a surge in the desire to house STEM activities under the one roof as a way to increase cross-disciplinary education and knowledge sharing, and The Science Place is a prime example of achieving this goal,” said HASSELL Principal Mark Roehrs. “This not only makes sense from a building and asset point of view, but also for student experience as it increases interaction.” Related: The Global Change Institute Operates in a Net Zero, Carbon Neutral Research Center in Brisbane In addition to the recovery and recycling of previous building materials, the LEED Gold -certified university building keeps power consumption to a minimum thanks to natural daylight, daylight-sensitive lighting, water-saving taps, and a light-colored reflective roof that reduces solar heat gain. A 25kW solar rooftop area also generates 125kWh of renewable energy a day. For improved health and comfort, the building is also equipped with superior indoor air quality management and testing, multiple low-emitting materials, and performance-optimized smart metering. + HASSELL Images © Andrew Rankin

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The Science Place becomes Australias first new LEED Gold-rated educational building

This tiny device can scan for skin cancer at a fraction of the current cost

November 9, 2017 by  
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sKan is an inexpensive device that can detect skin cancer at its early stages. The device creates heat maps to identify abnormalities in the skin often associated with melanoma, treatment for which has a higher success rate if detected early. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer worldwide, accounting for roughly 1 in 3 cancer diagnoses, and results in tens of thousands of deaths each year. sKan won this year’s international James Dyson award, bringing with it new funding and attention that could help save countless lives. To achieve its goal, the sKan device exploits the relatively higher metabolic rate of cancer cells. After a period of cooling, skin affected by cancer cells will more rapidly warm up, due to cancer’s high metabolism, than non-cancerous skin cells. sKan uses inexpensive yet accurate temperature sensors to locate rapidly heating areas of skin, shining a spotlight on potentially cancerous cells. These results are then displayed on a heat map, which can be used by a medical professional to determine whether a patient may require additional care. Early detection may mean life or death for those with skin cancer; the estimated 5-year survival rate for skin cancer patients whose illness is detected early is 98 percent. Related: Stanford’s new ‘accelerator on a chip’ could revolutionize medical care “By using widely available and inexpensive components, the sKan allows for melanoma skin cancer detection to be readily accessible to the many,” said James Dyson, British inventor and industrial designer . “It’s a very clever device with the potential to save lives around the world. This is why I have selected it at this year’s international winner.” In addition to the honor of winning the James Dyson award, the sKan team will receive $40,000, which it plans to use to refine the device’s design to meet US Food and Drug Administration standards . “We are truly humbled and excited to be given this remarkable opportunity,” said the sKan team on its win. Via New Atlas Images via James Dyson Awards

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This tiny device can scan for skin cancer at a fraction of the current cost

ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C.

July 13, 2016 by  
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMJCd04ehKc ? Created as part of the National Building Museum’s Summer Block Party series, the 12,540-square-foot ICEBERGS project comprises over 30 geometric, iceberg-shaped elements in a variety of sizes ranging from 16 feet to 56 feet in height. Some of the triangular pentahedron and octahedron “icebergs” are suspended in the air, while others appear to float. The jagged landscape was constructed from prefabricated units made from reusable scaffolding and translucent polycarbonate paneling . White slides punctuate some icebergs as a playful interactive feature. ? “ICEBERGS invokes the surreal underwater-world of glacial ice fields,” said James Corner, founder and director of James Corner Field Operations. “Such a world is both beautiful and ominous given our current epoch of climate change , ice-melt, and rising seas. The installation creates an ambient field of texture, movement, and interaction, as in an unfolding landscape of multiples, distinct from a static, single object.” Related: Gigantic swimmable ball pit takes over D.C.’s National Building Museum ? Visitors can experience ICEBERGS from the Great Hall floor that’s punctuated with triangular beanbags, caverns, and grottoes, or from a higher level where they can look down at the “water line” suspended 20 feet in the air. The tallest “iceberg” rises to the height of 56 feet and includes a viewing area. To complement the installation, the Daikaya restaurant provides Japanese ‘kakigori’ shaved ice treats. The installation opened July 2, 2016 and will run until September 5, 2016. + James Corner Field Operations + National Building Museum Images by Timothy Schenck

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ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C.

Tom Dixon transforms a 17th-century London church into a chic co-working space

May 27, 2016 by  
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The motivation behind the project began with Baughen’s desire to make the church more available to the daytime residents and creative workforce of Clerkenwell, an area in central London. The temporary intervention also gave Dixon the opportunity to display his new lighting and furniture products against a stunning historic backdrop with soaring ceilings and huge stained glass windows. “As the Church evolves and adapts to the new conditions of the 21st century, the opportunity of opening up to new audiences and unexpected collaborations becomes a necessity,” says Dixon. “For the design audience and the more permanent residents of Clerkenwell, we hope that a contemplative and spiritual space becomes more comfortable and accessible thanks to our small intervention.” Related: Tom Dixon’s dazzling Lens pendant lamps are made from 60 lenses The most eye-catching of Dixon’s pieces are the silver-coated CURVE lights that hang like a chandelier in the church’s main space and offer a sharp contrast with the colorful stained glass windows. The designer’s easily recognizable geometric chairs and tables have been added to an upstairs co-working space , while other furnishings populate the area close to the altar. The chandelier, along with a few other furnishings, has been donated to the church as gifts. + Tom Dixon Via Dezeen Images via Tom Dixon

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Tom Dixon transforms a 17th-century London church into a chic co-working space

5 reasons supply chains are the new sustainability hotspot

May 12, 2016 by  
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Verisk Maplecroft’s James Allan argues creativity within procurement departments is being driven by external forces such as new environmental laws.

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5 reasons supply chains are the new sustainability hotspot

The next frontier in climate action

March 4, 2016 by  
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Former NASA scientist and climate change activist James Hansen questions the Paris climate agreement and where we should go from here on climate during an interview at GreenBiz 16.

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The next frontier in climate action

Sustainability at the federal level

March 4, 2016 by  
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Sustainability at the federal level

Here’s what happened at Greenbuild 2015

November 20, 2015 by  
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At Greenbuild 2015, green building leaders from around the world, and even James Cameron, gathered to push the needle on a more sustainable built environment.

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Here’s what happened at Greenbuild 2015

James Cameron asks us to fight climate change by eating less meat and dairy

November 20, 2015 by  
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James Cameron, most notable for his direction of award-winning films and deep-sea diving endeavors, is wearing a new hat in the public arena as an avid environmentalist. Not only does he have plans to ensure the production of the Avatar sequels is entirely net energy neutral , he recently spoke at the Greenbuild conference about replacing conventional building construction with more environmentally responsible methods as the world’s population grows. Yet, Cameron’s latest mission is to educate the public on how something most folks do every day is contributing to global warming: eating meat and dairy . Read the rest of James Cameron asks us to fight climate change by eating less meat and dairy

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James Cameron asks us to fight climate change by eating less meat and dairy

Snøhetta reveals designs for Portland’s green-roofed James Beard Public Market

June 25, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Snøhetta reveals designs for Portland’s green-roofed James Beard Public Market Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: food market , green roof Willamette river , James Beard Public Market , James Beard Public Market by Snøhetta , James Beard Public Market portland , Portland , public market , snohetta

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Snøhetta reveals designs for Portland’s green-roofed James Beard Public Market

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