Lisa Jackson: How Apple aims to lead on environment and equity

October 27, 2020 by  
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Lisa Jackson: How Apple aims to lead on environment and equity Elsa Wenzel Tue, 10/27/2020 – 02:00 Apple’s Lisa Jackson is moving social justice to the top of the list for protecting the environment. Coming from one of Fortune’s “most powerful women in business ” at one of the world’s largest companies, she has views that could have a long-term global impact. Apple’s big-ticket sustainability goals released this year for 2030 include becoming carbon-neutral and achieving a net-zero impact in all operations. The company also recently embraced an outward-facing leadership role on its social impacts, with a $100 million investment to create a Racial and Equity Justice Initiative (REJI), which CEO Tim Cook asked Jackson to lead in June. How can we grow some Black and brown-owned businesses that are working on the issue of climate change? It’s not new for Apple’s vice president of environment, policy and social initiatives to see racism and climate change as intertwined. She capped off her two-decade career with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as its chief under President Barack Obama. Jackson recalled a key lesson from her New Orleans childhood to GreenBiz co-founder Joel Makower during a VERGE 20 virtual event Monday. 1. Identifying intersections “I know what it means to be at the receiving end of our industrial society, whether it’s the air quality coming from petrochemical facilities, of wind, or the water quality coming down the Mississippi River, or the Gulf of Mexico’s health — and that ecosystem and diversity, all those issues, conflate to me around the place I call home,” the chemical engineer said. For example, she has seen the resources of the world flow upward to the people who make inequitable decisions around land use and then profit from them — but not flowing back to the people who become victims of flooding, fires or other consequences of poor planning. “Those are the questions we have to solve if we’re really going to solve the climate crisis,” Jackson said. Fighting for equality and justice for my community has driven my career as an environmentalist. I’ll continue the work leading Apple’s Racial Equity and Justice Initiative. #BlackLivesMatter https://t.co/JKuaQP3I2r — Lisa P. Jackson (@lisapjackson) June 11, 2020 Jackson’s passion for addressing these problems deepened recently when she witnessed the combustive mix of poor air quality and high COVID-19 fatalities within historically underserved frontline communities. “It all comes together because we know that the co-pollutants of CO2 from fossil fuel, and from the fossil fuel-burning power sector and transportation sectors, are all part of that justice equation,” she said. 2. Empowering communities As part of its REJI initiative, which centers around representation, inclusion and accountability, Apple describes using its voice and cash to transform systemic disempowerment into empowerment. One way is to hire more coders of color and to build up wealth in underserved communities by doing more business with suppliers owned by people of color. “One of the things we did in the economic empowerment space is come up with this idea of an impact accelerator,” she said. “How can we grow some Black and brown-owned businesses that are working on the issue of climate change? Because we’ve always said that climate change is an economic opportunity, how can we make sure that opportunity is spread equally?” Plus, Apple is also nurturing coding hubs at historically Black colleges and universities. Apple’s $100 million toward REJI is nine to 10 times the investment committed by Amazon, Google and Facebook each toward racial justice causes. 3. Making the human factor material It’s been two years since Apple planted the seeds to grow a circular economy by committing to make all of its devices from recycled or renewable materials eventually. Jackson described how the iPhone maker quickly found that its “moonshot” of shunning ingredients that need to be mined is not just about closing the loop on material resources, but on human resources as well. The tech giant prioritized eliminating conflict minerals and questionably sourced rare earths early on because of the labor and supply chain difficulties involved. In this area, Apple so far has created its own recycled aluminum alloy for devices including the Apple Watch, MacBookAir and iPad, and it uses recycled tin in solder in some logic boards. It has developed profiles of 45 materials in terms of their impacts on the environment, society and supply chains, singling out 14 for early action on recycled or renewable sourcing. The haptic engine, which enables a variety of vibrations in iPhone models 11 and up, uses recycled rare earths. The Daisy disassembly robot gained a cousin, Dave, which recovers rare earth elements, steel and tungsten from spent devices and scrap. Apple is still aiming to make all of its products and packaging from recycled and renewable materials. So far all paper materials are recycled, and plastics have been reduced by 58 percent in four years. The company is more quietly progressing on safer chemistry. Toward its goal of gathering data on all the chemicals that comprise its products, it has information from 900 suppliers on 45,000 parts and materials. “As much as we want to continue to engage in communities to try to lift up the standards and use our purchasing power to lift up, we also have to be honest with ourselves and say, there’s also a need for us to show an alternative path,” Jackson said. 4. Being first and bigger Where Apple leads, others in the market listen. For instance, so far it has nudged more than 70 of its suppliers to adopt clean energy, which Apple has fully implemented in its offices, data centers and stores without leaning on offsets. The company’s supply chain partners of all sizes are ripe for doing something differently, Jackson said.  Because we’ve always said that climate change is an economic opportunity, how can we make sure that opportunity is spread equally? “They’ve seen what COVID can do, or a crisis can do, to a business that hasn’t thought about resilience and sustainability,” Jackson said. “Apple can help by modeling and also taking a risk on technologies and ways of doing business, and quickly scaling them.” For example, Apple was able in a single year to embed 100-recycled rare earth elements in the magnets of its iPhone 12 series. “If we can come up with a cleaner alternative, then our belief is that these other places will have no alternative but to clean up as well so that they can be competitive not just on an economic level, but on a social and environmental level as well,” she said. “That’s going to be the exciting work for Apple … in the next few years is to not only do it first but to do it bigger, and to hopefully leave behind a supply chain that’s now economical and accessible for other people. Because those industries, those enterprises will say, ‘OK, there are probably more people who want to buy recycled material as well’ — and that’s the circular economy.” Pull Quote How can we grow some Black and brown-owned businesses that are working on the issue of climate change? Because we’ve always said that climate change is an economic opportunity, how can we make sure that opportunity is spread equally? Topics Human Rights Equity & Inclusion Supply Chain VERGE 20 Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) On Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Apple’s Vice President, Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives Lisa Jackson. Apple Close Authorship

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Lisa Jackson: How Apple aims to lead on environment and equity

This sustainable Jackson Hole residence has a LED-lit indoor slide

July 2, 2020 by  
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The Jackson Tech House not only has spectacular views of the Teton Range from its location high on a double sloped site, but it also has a number of unique and sustainable features. The style of the exterior incorporates a modern-yet-rustic look with natural moss rock and unpainted corral board wood siding, while the inside contains surprising features such as heated ramps and an indoor slide. The project was designed by Cushing Terrell and Hoyt Architects . The multiple layers of the home that hug the surrounding terrain are connected by heated concrete ramps, and the main level connects to a recreation room with an indoor slide embedded with color-changing LED lights . Related: Passive House-inspired home ushers in spectacular Grand Tetons views For added sustainability, there are solar panels incorporated into the design as well as a number of green roofs and sustainable furnishing materials, including dark wood, concrete and steel accents. Some of the custom features in the Jackson Tech House include flat-screen panels inlaid into the entryway floor and an adjustable system of chainmail shade curtains that work on a trolly. The inlaid floor screens can be used to display artwork, photos or other images. There is a pair of triple-stacked bunk beds in one bedroom; another bedroom holds two sets of bunk beds near a corner window with views of the rugged terrain outside. The yard that surrounds the front door is landscaped with drought-resistant plants and succulents. Outside, a Pickard steam injection pizza oven is included in the outdoor kitchen and dining space so that the owners can make and enjoy meals while enjoying the beautiful views of the Wyoming mountains. Inside, the kitchen features an extra-long bar island with a gas range and hood, stainless steel appliances and hardwood flooring on a raised platform. In the family room, which opens up into the kitchen, a mechanized fireplace has doors that slide up and out to stay hidden when not in use, and there is a designated slot for firewood. + Cushing Terrell Photography by Gibeon Photography via Cushing Terrell

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This sustainable Jackson Hole residence has a LED-lit indoor slide

The South Pole is warming 3 times faster than anywhere else

July 2, 2020 by  
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The South Pole is getting warmer — in fact, this remote location is experiencing warming up to three times faster than the rest of the planet. Researchers are nearly certain this disturbing trend is due to human activity. Kyle Clem, a research fellow in climate science, explained the trend in an article for The Guardian . “My colleagues and I argue these warming trends are unlikely the result of natural climate variability alone,” he wrote. “The effects of human-made climate change appear to have worked in tandem with the significant influence natural variability in the tropics has on Antarctica’s climate. Together they make the south pole warming one of the strongest warming trends on Earth.” Related: New study sheds light on Antarctic sea ice mystery Because the icy landmass covers 5.4 million square miles, there is a lot of temperature variability.  Scientists have tracked temperatures since 1957 at the planet’s southernmost weather observatory, the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station. On the Antarctic plateau deep in the South Pole, the coldest region on Earth, average temperatures can dip to -60 degrees Celsius in winter and rise to -20 degrees Celsius in summer. Clem and his colleagues have focused on temperatures in the past 30 years. They concluded that between 1989 and 2018, the South Pole has warmed by 1.8 degrees Celsius. Since 2000, it’s been warming more rapidly. Scientists already knew that the Antarctic Peninsula and West Antarctica were getting warmer. In fact, Esperanza, Argentina’s research station on the Antarctic Peninsula’s northern tip, reached a new high of 18.2 degrees Celsius, or 64.9 degrees Fahrenheit, this February. But scientists are especially alarmed to learn of the temperature increase deep in the continent’s remote, mountainous interior. Clem and his colleagues analyzed more than 200 climate model simulations to gauge human influence on climate change. “These climate models show recent increases in greenhouse gases have possibly contributed around 1? of the total 1.8? of warming at the south pole,” he wrote. Stormy weather and low-pressure systems around the Antarctic Peninsula in the Weddell Sea partially account for the increased temperatures. But the combination of weather and greenhouse gases are likely the problem. “The observed warming exceeds 99.9% of all possible trends without human influence — and this means the recent warming is extremely unlikely under natural conditions, albeit not impossible,” Clem wrote. Via The Guardian Image via Jodeng

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The South Pole is warming 3 times faster than anywhere else

Wellesleys Global Flora greenhouse can generate all of its own energy

July 2, 2020 by  
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Boston-based architecture firm Kennedy & Violich Architecture has flipped the script for energy-intensive greenhouses with the net-zero energy Global Flora, a sustainable botanical facility for Wellesley College in Massachusetts. Engineered to exceed the Net Zero Water & Energy requirements of the Living Building Challenge, Global Flora will follow passive solar principles and draw on geothermal energy.  The botanical facility will also be integrated with an open-source Interactive Sensor Platform to allow people to gather and share real-time data about the plants, including their soil, water and air conditions. The Global Flora botanical facility builds on the legacy of Dr. Margaret Ferguson, who, in the 1920s, emphasized plant biology as a central part of science education and encouraged Wellesley College students to “listen to” plants and learn through hands-on interdisciplinary experiences. The new greenhouse will serve as a botany lab and “museum” for the college and will also be available and free to the public. The gathered data from the open-source Interactive Sensor Platform will be accessible to public schools and international research universities as well. Related: Resurrected greenhouse to honor father of modern genetics Located next to the existing visitor center, Global Flora will comprise Dry and Tropical biomes separated by interior ETFE partitions. Unlike most greenhouses, Wellesley College’s botanical facility is almost completely closed off on the north side with a gabion wall filled with local and reclaimed stone to eliminate almost all heat loss through surfaces that don’t receive direct sunlight. Energy recovery units, geothermal-powered radiant heating and cooling and vertical water features help create local microclimates and keep energy use to a minimum. The greenhouse also includes stormwater retention tanks. In addition to the Dry and Tropical biomes that cover a variety of plant habitats from deserts to mangroves, Global Flora includes a seasonal Camellia Pavilion on the northeast side that houses the college’s iconic Durant Camellia tree, which is over 140 years old. + Kennedy & Violich Architecture Images via Kennedy & Violich Architecture

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Wellesleys Global Flora greenhouse can generate all of its own energy

Tropicfeel launches hemp capsule clothing collection

July 2, 2020 by  
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In a move, or movement, away from fast fashion, the sustainability minded travel and lifestyle company Tropicfeel has created an all-natural clothing line that makes packing easy and is equally as easy on the environment. On the heels of its wildly successful 2017 Kickstarter campaign for a lightweight and durable shoe called Monsoon, Tropicfeel moved into the clothing realm, directly aimed at disrupting the wasteful and polluting mainstream clothing industry. The newly unveiled hemp selections provide travel or everyday essentials in a capsule collection that makes mixing and matching a breeze.  Related: Olli Ella releases capsule wardrobe made with organic cotton The nine Stand Up wear-anywhere pieces are made from sustainable, natural fibers including hemp, tree pulp-derived Tencel and organic cotton fibers. These natural materials, along with compostable packaging, create products manufactured as totally vegan , environmentally friendly, lightweight and long-lasting.  The capsule collections include an olive green maxi-length T-shirt dress, feather-light ecru shorts, simple T-shirts and even a statement beach towel. The Stand Up collection keeps color options to a minimum for easy coordinating. Tropicfeel burst into the fashion market three years ago with a Kickstarter campaign in the hopes of achieving crowdfunding to help launch its debut shoe design, resulting in the most-funded shoe in Kickstarter history. That’s when the team knew they were on to something, that something being a shared desire to own functional fashion pieces that last longer, are versatile enough to wear on a hike or out to dinner and are made in an environmentally conscious way. The company explained how hemp as the primary material helps achieve these goals. “Hemp requires minimal fertilizer and as little as half the water required for pure cotton, whilst the hardy plants hoover up vast amounts of CO2 from the air, return up to 70% of nutrients back into the soil and protect against soil erosion,” Tropicfeel stated. “Designed with the minimalist traveler in mind, the Tropicfeel collection is also perfect for day-to-day life: hemp is naturally anti-bacterial and anti-odor, breathable and cooling in summer’s heat.” + Tropicfeel Images via Tropicfeel

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Tropicfeel launches hemp capsule clothing collection

LEED Platinum fire station boosts firefighter wellness in Seattle

May 16, 2018 by  
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Firefighting is consistently ranked one of the most stressful jobs in the U.S. — which is why the well-being of firefighters becomes all the more important in architecture firm Bohlin Cywinski Jackson’s design of Seattle Fire Station 32. Located in the heart of the Alaska Junction neighborhood in West Seattle, the 18,000-square-foot fire station boasts a handsome and modern appearance that not only enhances firefighters’ wellness, but also welcomes the community. The fire station , completed last year, is crafted to be highly energy efficient, and it recently achieved LEED Platinum certification. Filled with natural light and optimized for scenic views, Seattle Fire Station 32 is set in the heart of the neighborhood at the threshold between single-family residential areas and a denser commercial zone. To mitigate the site’s small size, the architects built upward, resulting in a four-story building with a basement. The building engages the civic arena with public areas that are visible from the street, such as the beanery and station office. The entrance of the office is marked by a 25-foot-tall wall-mounted fire truck sculpture . A 59-foot-long ladder truck and the firefighters’ activities are also put on full display behind a glazed end wall along Alaska Street. Related: Seattle’s Firestation 30 is a Copper-Clad Green Community Beacon Private bunk rooms and individual offices are tucked along the quiet residential-facing side of the building. The operational and administrative areas are housed on the lower floors, while the firefighters’ living spaces are located on the third floor. This floor opens up to an outdoor terrace overlooking the green roof . “The hose drying tower acts as a visual marker for the station between the southern residential hillside and tall mixed-use buildings to the north,” the architects wrote. “With a subtle lantern effect at night, the tower acts as a beacon of safety for residents and visitors.” The project was awarded a 2018 Green GOOD DESIGN Award , and earned LEED Platinum certification this month. + Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Images by Nic Lehoux

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LEED Platinum fire station boosts firefighter wellness in Seattle

Apple eyes ‘lifting’ voice of companies committed to clean energy

September 22, 2017 by  
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Lisa Jackson on the company’s newest renewable energy commitments, circular economy initiatives and what she would say to Scott Pruitt.

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Apple eyes ‘lifting’ voice of companies committed to clean energy

Manetti Shrem Museum’s 50,000-square-foot canopy was inspired by the texture of the agrarian landscape

November 28, 2016 by  
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The light-filled, multi-use building was built to further the educational mission of the museum and become a new cultural destination for the entire community. It will offer spaces for exhibitions, classes, studios and communal activities, all nestled under a 50,000-square-foot floating ‘Grand Canopy’ made of perforated aluminum triangular beams. Related: The Smithsonian’s Vaulted Canopy Brings Nature and Light Inside Chosen from a design competition in 2013, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and SO – IL, together with construction company Whiting-Turner, created a building that redefines the concept of a university museum and the way in which the campus community will experience art. Related: Brooklyn Children’s Museum Unveils Plans for New Eco-Friendly Rooftop Canopy “The museum’s design was inspired by the agrarian landscape of the Central Valley, which is rich in pattern, texture and color,” said Karl Backus, design principal from Bohlin Cywinski Jackson’s San Francisco office. “We incorporated these elements into the program of the building as a way to create smaller volumes and provide an approachable, human scale .” + Bohlin Cywinski Jackson + SO-IL Photos by Iwan Baan

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Manetti Shrem Museum’s 50,000-square-foot canopy was inspired by the texture of the agrarian landscape

Movable walls on this Moonlight Cabin allow owners to turn their house inside out

July 20, 2016 by  
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Tucked within its small footprint is a treasure trove of luxuries, all designed to house a small family on vacation. The cabin spans a humble 645 square feet (60 square meters) and includes a fully appointed kitchen and bathroom. In the main living area, a giant U-shaped built-in sofa provides maximum lounge space and a spectacular view from a floor-to-ceiling window , obscured only slightly by a suspended wood stove. The home’s interior is fitted with Victorian ash timber linings coated with limed wood wash, which surround the space in elegant, contemporary style. The minimal interior design and restricted palette create a tranquil environment for relaxation, while carefully selected sustainable materials make the Moonlight Cabin as cost-effective as it is attractive. Related: Cape Schanck House boasts sweeping views of the Australian dune landscape The architects chose Spotted Gum for the cabin’s exterior panels, a native Australian variety of eucalyptus hardwood. The sustainable material is often used in flooring, but here demonstrates the same durable features, particularly the ability to expand and contract naturally in the changing climate. Shutters invite cross-ventilation , as well as offer the homeowners a bevy of privacy options. The shutters can be positioned to open up the interior space to the out-of-doors, or closed to ensure security and safety in the event of a storm, or when the owners are ready to pack up and go back to their primary home overseas. + Jackson Clements Burrows Images via Jeremy Weihrauch/Gollings Studio

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Movable walls on this Moonlight Cabin allow owners to turn their house inside out

Movable walls on this Moonlit Cabin allow owners to turn their house inside out

July 19, 2016 by  
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Tucked within its small footprint is a treasure trove of luxuries, all designed to house a small family on vacation. The cabin spans a humble 645 square feet (60 square meters) and includes a fully appointed kitchen and bathroom. In the main living area, a giant U-shaped built-in sofa provides maximum lounge space and a spectacular view from a floor-to-ceiling window , obscured only slightly by a suspended wood stove. The home’s interior is fitted with Victorian ash timber linings coated with limed wood wash, which surround the space in elegant, contemporary style. The minimal interior design and restricted palette create a tranquil environment for relaxation, while carefully selected sustainable materials make the Moonlight Cabin as cost-effective as it is attractive. Related: Cape Schanck House boasts sweeping views of the Australian dune landscape The architects chose Spotted Gum for the cabin’s exterior panels, a native Australian variety of eucalyptus hardwood. The sustainable material is often used in flooring, but here demonstrates the same durable features, particularly the ability to expand and contract naturally in the changing climate. Shutters invite cross-ventilation , as well as offer the homeowners a bevy of privacy options. The shutters can be positioned to open up the interior space to the out-of-doors, or closed to ensure security and safety in the event of a storm, or when the owners are ready to pack up and go back to their primary home overseas. + Jackson Clements Burrows Images via Jeremy Weihrauch/Gollings Studio

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Movable walls on this Moonlit Cabin allow owners to turn their house inside out

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