Taco Bell launches new menu for vegetarians

September 12, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

While in-the-know vegetarians have navigated Taco Bell’s menu for years, the fast food chain is moving plant-based food to the forefront with an official vegetarian section on its menu. The new menu debuts Thursday, Sept. 12 at Taco Bell’s 7,000 U.S. restaurants . Only two of the items in the vegetarian section are new: the Black Bean Crunchwrap Supreme and a Black Bean Quesarito. But clearly, marking the items as vegetarian makes ordering a much easier experience for customers who eat a plant-based diet. Related: KFC partners with Beyond Meat for vegan chicken nuggets The Black Bean Quesarito ($2.99) consists of black beans, seasoned rice, chipotle sauce, cheese, nacho cheese sauce and reduced-fat sour cream rolled up in a flour tortilla. Popular upgrades include jalapenos, pico de gallo and guacamole. The Black Bean Crunchwrap Supreme ($3.69) adds lettuce and tomato to black beans, nacho cheese sauce and reduced-fat sour cream and serves it in a crispier tortilla. Other vegetarian menu items include three kinds of burritos, a tostada, the veggie power menu bowl, cheesy roll-ups and beans and rice. A green emblem on the new menu signifies that the American Vegetarian Association has certified Taco Bell’s vegetarian food items for people who “are lacto-ovo, allowing consumption of dairy and eggs but not animal byproducts.” But strict vegetarians should beware the fryer. The menu has this disclaimer: “We may use the same frying oil to prepare menu items that could contain meat . Vegetarian and meat ingredients are handled in common, and cross contact may occur, which may not be acceptable to certain types of vegetarian diets.” Taco Bell plans to “further innovate in this growing space,” the restaurant said in a press release. Unlike other fast food restaurants that are embracing imitation meat made by Beyond Meat , Taco Bell is, so far, sticking with less-processed whole foods, like black and pinto beans. Beans are also inexpensive, allowing Taco Bell to sell burritos for as little as one dollar. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has a handy guide on its website for vegans eating at Taco Bell. The magic words “fresco style” mean that instead of cheese and dairy-heavy sauces, you want pico de gallo and guacamole. + Taco Bell Via CNN Image via Taco Bell

Here is the original post: 
Taco Bell launches new menu for vegetarians

How can I reuse or recycle a wheelie bin?

November 18, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Recycle

Comments Off on How can I reuse or recycle a wheelie bin?

Hi. Long time no blog! Sorry about that. This has annoyed me so much though that I feel compelled to post! Bradford Council has started charging for their previously free garden waste collection service. Only about a third of eligible household have signed up so the Council estimates there are around 55,000 “brown bins” no longer in use around the district. The Council estimates around half of those 55,000 will want to keep their wheelie bin as a spare or for other usage , and are starting to collect the other half. However, a local councillor doesn’t think that many people will want to keep them. Cllr Rebecca Poulsen, the local Tory spokesperson for waste, said: “I can’t see most people wanting to keep them for other storage purposes, really. “I can’t think there’s an awful lot to do with them.” Then you don’t have much imagination, do you Rebecca! On our allotments, old wheelie bins are prized possessions – a couple of holes drilled in the right places and they easily become sturdy water butts or compost bins . They’re also cheap, dry storage for plant pots, canes, plastic sheeting & netting, and woodchips. At home, I use old bins for storing my chicken feed and my in-laws use them, with an access hatch cut in the bottom, for storing firewood and multifuel . And they’re not just for grow-your-own hippies like me: I know other people who use them for storing kids garden toys, sports equipment and patio cushions out of season . And they’re just some of the easiest, most boring reuses! I’ve seen them cut in half to be used planters or wheelbarrows , and my old neighbours in Leeds even once transformed an old wheelie bin into a go-cart ! What other ideas are there for reusing wheelie bins? What would you do with one?

View original here: 
How can I reuse or recycle a wheelie bin?

Zero Waste Grocery Experience Goes Worldwide

May 31, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Zero Waste Grocery Experience Goes Worldwide

Whenever I take a peak at the items in my trash can before bringing them to the dumpster, I am astonished by how much food packaging there is. My household is not unique: one-third of the materials in landfills consist of disposable food packaging….

Original post:
Zero Waste Grocery Experience Goes Worldwide

How can I “reuse” fresh eggs that we can’t eat?

September 4, 2012 by  
Filed under Recycle

Comments Off on How can I “reuse” fresh eggs that we can’t eat?

(Hi! Sorry to regular readers for the stupidly long break in posting – I’ve been reading all the comments as usual as they come in, just not posting any new content myself due to a combination of busy-ness, illness and laziness. I’m hoping to get back to regular scheduled blogging again now though!) This question is a bit like the one I posted six years ago (!!) about ways to use up no longer fresh eggs but this one is a little different. We’ve got our own chickens now so always have super-fresh eggs – but sometimes, like this last weekend, I have to give them medication or treat their coup with things that mean we shouldn’t eat their eggs for a few days. The eggs look perfectly fine but there is a risk of contamination so we can’t eat them. I can’t bring myself to just throw them in the compost though – or even throw them at my boyfriend when he’s not paying attention… 😉 I know egg yolks can be used as a hair conditioner or for a face mask – does anyone have any favourite recipes/techniques? I’ve also heard some people using them as a fertiliser boost for plants – do any plants particularly benefit from an eggy treat (especially at this time of year), or is there any that definitely shouldn’t have it? Any other suggestions? And finally, less on topic but critically important, did you all have a good summer? (Or good winter, if you’re on the southern side of things?)

Read more:
How can I “reuse” fresh eggs that we can’t eat?

How can I reuse or recycle large (catering size) food cans?

March 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Business, Recycle

Comments Off on How can I reuse or recycle large (catering size) food cans?

Sam has emailed asking about large food cans: I have a number of large metal food cans, some zinc lined, which are called #10 size. They hold about 5 or 6 lbs (just under 3kg) of beans, or other foods. Now that they’re empty, they are open on one end, with no plastic lid to fit them. Any ideas? Surely I’m not the only one faced with this. I can recycle them, but would like to reuse them. They sound like pretty big tin cans – probably similar to what we call “catering size” in the UK. I think at least some of the ideas we have for regular size tin cans could be supersized here: plant pots, candle/tea holders for several candles, or using them as a vessel for making those candles in the first place. But are there any reuses (or upcycling ideas) that are perfect for these bigger cans? Could the can be flattened out to make anything?

Continued here: 
How can I reuse or recycle large (catering size) food cans?

She recycled that! Upcycling novelty hats into bunting/pennants

March 29, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Recycle

Comments Off on She recycled that! Upcycling novelty hats into bunting/pennants

Last September, Karen emailed us about the vast collection of novelty jester hats that her boyfriend had collected at various carnivals and festivals over the years. She wanted to know how she could reuse or recycle them as she hadn’t had much success giving them away. Lots of people made suggestions – including trying to give them to local schools/drama groups/groups that did clowning classes or making them into a purse or tea cosy – but Karen loved Meg’s suggestion of turning them into bunting/pennants : Last year I sent an email about novelty jester hats and of the suggestions was to make a string of decorative pennants, like the kind for birthdays (the upside down triangle). I did this and am pretty proud of the result!! Oh very fun! Great work Karen – and thanks to Meg for the suggestion in the first place! 😀 I do love to see what people are reusing and recycling – especially if they’ve been inspired by something on the site – so if you’ve reused/recycled anything in an interesting, clever or fun way, please do get in touch 🙂

Read the rest here: 
She recycled that! Upcycling novelty hats into bunting/pennants

How can I reuse or recycle little paint tester pots?

March 14, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Recycle

Comments Off on How can I reuse or recycle little paint tester pots?

We covered old leftover paint on the site many, many moons ago (roughly 66-67 moons ago apparently) but these last few weeks, we’ve been rather overrun with little tester pots of paint here. I hate tester pots from an environmental point of view – usually plastic pots, sometimes with an integral brush, that are thrown away once their purpose has been served – but I’ve made enough costly paint mistakes in the past (and in the very recent past, she says knowing there is £80 worth of unsuitable-for-current-job paint sat upstairs…) to begrudgingly accept using them. I think there are two questions here: how can I use up the little bits of paint? And second, is there anything I can do with the little pots? The amount of paint in each tester is only enough for very small projects. I remember at uni painting a set of drawers with leftover tester pot paint – each drawer a different shade of blue – and the sides of the pots themselves tell me they’re suitable for stencilling, where you just need a little paint of each colour. Have you done (or seen) any mini-craft projects using leftover tester pot emulsion paint? As for the pots themselves, the ones I have here tell me they’re polypropylene – plastic number 5 – which can be recycled but isn’t collected everywhere yet. The pots seal very tightly – as you’d expect from something containing paint – and so they could be washed out & reused for containing other liquid things or keeping other things dry or safe. I won’t use them for anything food related – since they’ve contained paint and aren’t food grade – and probably not anything like plant seeds either — but they’d be fine for small amounts of non-edibles/growables: like old film canisters , they’d be useful for all sorts of little fishing related things , for beads or buttons , and nuts/bolts/screws or sewing needles etc. What would you reuse them for?

Excerpt from: 
How can I reuse or recycle little paint tester pots?

How can I reuse or recycle a unwanted solid deodorant bar from Lush?

February 20, 2012 by  
Filed under Recycle

Comments Off on How can I reuse or recycle a unwanted solid deodorant bar from Lush?

Kathryn has emailed us asking about reuses for a solid deodorant bar: I recently bought a solid deodorant from Lush ( this one ). It smells nice, but it’s not right for me. Other than using it to keep my sock drawer fresh, could I do anything else with it? The ingredients are listed as including chamomile vinegar, bicarb and essential oils, so I’m thinking I might be able to use it in some other cleaning function… crumble it into the washing machine? Any thoughts? Lush has a full ingredients list – and info about each ingredient – on their website — can any cosmetics experts give us their reuse opinion based on those? Most of the key ingredients are also used in their soap bars but I’m wondering if the combination of astringents in this bar might get in the way of cleaning power… anyone know? I like the sock drawer idea – I also wonder if it would be cut in half and used as a deodorant in undesirably aromatic trainers. Any other reuses to take advantage of the nice scent? What would you do with it?

See more here:
How can I reuse or recycle a unwanted solid deodorant bar from Lush?

How can I reuse or recycle old PVC pipes?

February 14, 2012 by  
Filed under Business, Recycle

Comments Off on How can I reuse or recycle old PVC pipes?

We’ve had an email from Madhvi asking : how can I creatively recycle old PVC pipes? We’ve covered some reuses for guttering and drainpipes – which are increasingly plastic these days – but I thought it was worth asking Madhvi’s question because PVC pipes come in all sorts of diameters and lengths. A few months ago, when I was looking to build us a laundry basket for the bedroom, I spotted this PVC pipe laundry hamper project , which I thought was a very neat idea. Depending on the size, that could possibly be made from offcuts or the idea shrunk down if you only had smaller pieces available. In a similar constructed-with-plumbing-joints vein, I also like the idea of this PVC pipe laptop stand and this bike stand . As for smaller reuses without additional parts, I like this bathroom storage idea – I’m not sure how many people have two sets of curlers but it’s an adaptable idea, especially regarding the cables. You could use them to tidy up electric cables under desks/behind TVs etc – if all the cables go through sections of pipes, they’re less likely to be underfoot and get tangled. (If the end plugs are too wide to go through the pipe, you can cut slot in it to slide the cable through instead – this guy was doing it for something a little different but this is what I mean by a slot .) Similarly, you can use them instead of kitchen roll/toilet roll tubes for storing electric wires & extension cables when they’re not in use – we’re a geeky household, we’ve got a lot of spare wires 😉 And that’s all before we start thinking about ideas for the garden! As for actual recycling, PVC recycling has increased over recent years but it’s still not as commonly collected for recycling as some other plastics (and it’s harder to recycle too). If you have a lot of pipes to get rid of, contact your local council’s waste department to see if they can accept them for recycling – or if they’re still in a new/usable condition, pass them on to someone else yourself through eBay, Freecycle/Freegle or Craig’s List etc. How would you reuse or recycle old plastic/PVC pipes? Have you used them anywhere interesting around your home or garden?

Original post:
How can I reuse or recycle old PVC pipes?

How can I reuse or recycle a whole kitchen?

February 9, 2012 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on How can I reuse or recycle a whole kitchen?

I’m back post-lurgy and I thought I’d post this great question from James – asking how to recycle a whole kitchen: We shall be replacing our kitchen in the next few months. The present one is 15 years old and is perfectly serviceable. I don’t want to “skip” it. Any suggestion as to how I can recycle it? My first suggestion would be to try to pass it on – lots of people would love a kitchen revamp but can’t afford to go the whole hog so just replace cabinet doors etc. I regularly see sets of door & drawer fronts offered up on eBay, Gumtree or Freecycle/Freegle (and probably Craig’s List in the US). Built-in appliances can be sold/passed on separately too as they often expire before the rest of the kitchen so people might want to replace just those bits. People don’t just use them for revamping their own full kitchens either – someone might want to make a “tea station” at a community venue, or for storage in a porch/understairs cupboard – so if you’ve not got a lot, someone still might want them for that sort of thing instead. And tatty but still usable cupboards and worksurfaces are still useful in places where function very much trumps form like a garage, cellar or shed – and old sinks are often useful in those places too. We recently covered ways to reuse old ovens (and toaster ovens ) too so again, people might want those for non-culinary pursuits where aesthetics are less important. As for more creative reuses (rather than just reusing stuff for its original purpose), I’ve made oversized planters from wooden cupboard doors before, I’ve seen people making pretty serving trays from doors and Alison Bailey Smith curated an art project last year where people used her old kitchen as art materials . (Of course, I also have to mention the most important point in the recycling triangle – reduce . New kitchens are very resource intensive and a greener option would be to revamp an old kitchen rather than replacing it with all new …. but you know what, I think that’s a whole ‘nother post for tomorrow! 😉 ) Any other suggestions for ways that James could recycle his whole kitchen? Have you given away an old kitchen – or got one from someone else? Any tips? (Photo by cgarbiano )

See original here: 
How can I reuse or recycle a whole kitchen?

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1220 access attempts in the last 7 days.