The world’s first space hotel could launch by 2022

April 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The world’s first space hotel could launch by 2022

We’ve all heard of the companies promising to launch humans on trips to space , but have you thought about where you will stay once you get there? Startup Orion Span thinks they have the answer – and they’re planning to launch a luxury space hotel into orbit in the next few years. If this sounds like something you’d be interested in, start saving your pennies – a 12-night stay will set you back a mere $9.5 million PER PERSON. But don’t worry, the price includes transportation, food and drinks, and a three-month training course. The Aurora Station hotel will be able to accommodate four guests at a time, plus two crew members. The station will float above the Earth in low orbit (about 200 miles above the planet – 50 miles below the ISS) and the company claims it will be ready to start hosting guests by 2022. That’s extremely soon – keep in mind that other companies have set lofty goals for space hotels that didn’t quite get realized . The company plans to start with one station and expand as demand grows. If you want to book your stay right away, 80k will hold you a spot until the hotel is built and launched. Related: Elon Musk says trips to Mars coming as soon as next year Speaking of, Orion Span hasn’t provided much in the way of details for its space hotel. For instance, the company says it plans to manufacture the station at a Houston facility that hasn’t been built yet. Nor has it disclosed how it plans to transport people to the station – it seems likely that it will team up with one of the companies who is developing private space travel. Even still, it’s a pretty exciting idea, and not a bad price considering that it costs $81 million for an astronaut to hitch a ride to the ISS on a Russian rocket. Via Engadget Images via Orion Span

See original here: 
The world’s first space hotel could launch by 2022

MIT’s mind-reading AlterEgo headset can hear what you’re thinking

April 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on MIT’s mind-reading AlterEgo headset can hear what you’re thinking

Have you ever wished you could simply think a command and your computer would respond? That’s the future envisioned by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers who created AlterEgo, a wearable system that allows you to converse with a computer without using your voice or movement. According to a video on the project from MIT Media Lab, the ultimate goal of AlterEgo is “to combine humans and computers.” A computing system and wearable device comprise AlterEgo, a futuristic project led by graduate student Arnav Kapur of the Fluid Interfaces group at MIT . Electrodes, a machine learning system, and bone-conduction headphones help get the job done: the electrodes “pick up neuromuscular signals in the jaw and face that are triggered by internal verbalizations — saying words ‘in your head’ — but are undetectable to the human eye,” according to a MIT News statement. A machine learning system, trained to correspond certain signals with words, receives the signals. The bone-conduction headphones “transmit vibrations through the bones of the face to the inner ear.” Related: Elon Musk’s latest company aims to make us cyborgs within the next four years The video on AlterEgo shows Kapur experimenting with the device, asking for the time or adding up prices in a grocery store without ever saying a word out loud. While the commands he gives are simple, typically involving a single word or number, the video feels like a scene right out of science fiction. MIT professor Pattie Maes, who is Kapur’s thesis advisor, said in MIT’s statement, “We basically can’t live without our cell phones , our digital devices. But at the moment, the use of those devices is very disruptive. If I want to look something up that’s relevant to a conversation I’m having, I have to find my phone and type in the passcode and open an app and type in some search keyword, and the whole thing requires that I completely shift attention from my environment and the people that I’m with to the phone itself.” Part of the goal for a project like AlterEgo is to allow users to stay in the moment. In a usability study with the prototype wearable interface, the system’s average transcription accuracy was around 92 percent, according to MIT News. Kapur, along with Maes and undergraduate student Shreyas Kapur, wrote a paper on AlterEgo and presented it at the Association for Computing Machinery ‘s ACM Intelligent User Interface conference , which took place last month in Tokyo, Japan. + MIT News Image via Lorrie Lejeune/MIT

See the rest here: 
MIT’s mind-reading AlterEgo headset can hear what you’re thinking

Solar-powered house in Ontario redefines sustainable living in the wilderness

April 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered house in Ontario redefines sustainable living in the wilderness

This remote cottage , nestled deep in a thick forest 160 miles from Toronto, Canada, allows for sustainable living deep within its wooded surroundings. It occupies a quiet lakeside site and functions as a weekend retreat for the architect’s family. The project was conceived by architect Kelly Doran and designed by his non-profit, MASS Design Group , which is known for innovative, sustainable projects like the Butaro Hospital in Rwanda . The 2,500-square-foot home has a simple layout, with the porch, kitchen, dining room and living area linearly connected from west to east. There is a wood-burning stove at the center of the structure. Each of the three bedrooms offers views of Lake Havelock and access to the deck that runs the length of the house. Related: Modern solar-powered Ontario home is insulated with straw bales Built-in bookcases and cabinets offer plenty of storage space , while clerestory windows facilitate cross-ventilation . Beautiful furniture pieces and fixtures, like the Hiroshima woodseat armchairs by Naoto Fukasawa for Mjolk , and pendants by Jasper Morrison and Peter Bowles provide a more contemporary feel. A garage is housed in the wing that is perpendicular to the main body of the house. A nearby solar array powers the tightly insulated house, which also has a septic tank and leach field for wastewater processing. The house is in a remote location, with only a private logging road as an access route. Surrounded by wilderness, with just three other neighbors, this home is focused on serenity. + MASS Design Group Via Dwell Photos by Marcus Oleniuk

Here is the original post: 
Solar-powered house in Ontario redefines sustainable living in the wilderness

NASA International Space Station funding could end by 2025 under Trump administration

January 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on NASA International Space Station funding could end by 2025 under Trump administration

The International Space Station (ISS) was launched in 1998, and since then astronauts from around 18 countries have visited. Now,  Donald Trump’s administration  could be aiming to end NASA funding for the two-decades-long effort.  The Verge reported they reviewed a draft budget proposal that included plans to stop support for ISS by 2025. 2028 is the date many people consider to be the end of the ISS’ operational lifetime, according to The Verge. Barack Obama’s administration approved an extension of the space station until at least 2024. The Verge also said many people in the commercial space industry have hoped for another extension until 2028, so NASA could transition ISS operations to the commercial sector, or companies could “establish a commercial module in lower Earth orbit” – which they might not be able to accomplish by 2024. Related: NASA is returning to the moon – but they don’t know how The Trump administration proposal doesn’t seem to give them a lot of time. The Verge pointed out the draft could be altered before the official budget request – although they spoke with “two people familiar with the matter” who said the directive would be included in the final proposal. Then Congress would have to approve the budget proposal. This is a bad idea. Let's decide when to deorbited #ISS based on the readiness of its successor, not by picking a date and crossing our fingers. https://t.co/lUkUmgWh2b — Michael L-A (@CommanderMLA) January 25, 2018 Former NASA astronaut Michael Lopez-Alegria tweeted the move would be a bad idea. The Verge said an intention to cancel funding could signal to international partners the United States isn’t interested in the program’s continuation – and many of those partners haven’t yet decided if they’ll keep working on the effort after 2024. The ISS costs NASA around $3 to $4 billion a year, and some people in Congress seem to think that money would be better spent on deep space vehicles. But according to The Verge, “canceling the ISS too early without a viable replacement could lead to a gap of human activities in lower Earth orbit.” Via The Verge Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

Read the original post:
NASA International Space Station funding could end by 2025 under Trump administration

Doug Aitken’s mirrored underwater pavilions call attention to our deteriorating oceans

January 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Doug Aitken’s mirrored underwater pavilions call attention to our deteriorating oceans

American artist Doug Aitken sank three mirrored domes into the seabed near California’s Catalina Island. Why, you ask? The artist wants swimmers to dive into the waters to get a closer look at the three reflective pavilions in order to bring attention to the deteriorating conditions of the world’s oceans. After the mirrored pavilions were constructed off-site, Aitken moored them into the seabed at differing depths to create an interactive art installation. The reflective cladding reflects and refracts the light in the water, giving off an ethereal underwater light show. Wide openings in the domes let divers and marine life swim through effortlessly. Related: Mirror-covered ‘Mirage’ house disappears into the California desert According to the artist, “Part of each structure is mirrored to reflect the underwater seascape and create a kaleidoscopic observatory for the viewer, while other surfaces are rough and rock-like. The environments created by the sculptures will constantly change with the currents and the time of day, focusing the attention of the viewer on the rhythm of the ocean and its life cycles.” The underwater art installation is a collaboration between Aitken and Parley for the Oceans , an ocean activist group that seeks to spread awareness about the dire state of our maritime environment. Aitken’s process creating and sinking the domes is a call to action for the world to wake up and see that the future of our waters is fairly bleak. + Doug Aitken Via Dezeen Images via Doug Aitken

More:
Doug Aitken’s mirrored underwater pavilions call attention to our deteriorating oceans

Space station lettuce farm now producing fresh greens every 10 days for crew

December 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Space station lettuce farm now producing fresh greens every 10 days for crew

This is the year “astronaut food” meets “rabbit food.” Finally, crew members living aboard the International Space Station can munch on fresh leafy greens as part of their regular diet , in addition to the airtight packages of freeze-dried meals that have sustained space explorers for decades. After several years in development and testing, NASA’s very own “space gardener” Shane Kimbrough has successfully harvested several batches of fresh lettuce, while carefully tending the tiny plants and troubleshooting their moisture and nutrient needs along the way. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1Gxn_nfgWA Finding ways to grow safe, nutritious fresh vegetables in zero gravity has been a challenge, to put it mildly. During his historic 340-day mission aboard ISS, American astronaut Scott Kelly assisted in the early stages of NASA’s “Veggie” system, which was developed by Orbital Technologies Corp. (ORBITEC) in Madison, Wisconsin, and tested at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida before deploying to the ISS in mid-2014 . ISS crew members feasted on freshly harvested leafy greens grown in space for the first time back in August 2015 . The next challenge was to increase crop yields so that the system could produce enough fresh greens for the entire crew, which typically ranges from three to six astronauts but can occasionally rise as high as 10. Related: Astronauts are munching on lettuce grown in space for the first time ever Kimbrough oversees the operations of the Veg-03 experiment, the most recent phase of the ongoing project. The latest round began October 25 and involves six red romaine lettuce plants growing simultaneously for the first time. Because lettuce can be harvested (by cutting) and then regrow in about 10 days , it’s the perfect renewable crop for the space station, where resources and square footage are at a premium. The most recent harvest, which took place December 2, yielded a small amount of lettuce which was divided between crew member consumption and conservation for scientific evaluation. The ongoing experiment serves a dual purpose, in that ISS crew will gain access to fresh, nutritious greens to help balance their shelf-stable diet and NASA will be able to learn more about how various forms of life function in zero gravity environments. Via NASA Images via NASA

See more here:
Space station lettuce farm now producing fresh greens every 10 days for crew

International Space Station is a germophobe’s nightmare, says new report

October 28, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on International Space Station is a germophobe’s nightmare, says new report

Space is gross. At least, the part of space where the humans live, at least. The International Space Station is a temporary home nearly 250 miles above Earth for three to 10 astronauts at any given time, and as a result, the place is crawling with germs. After nearly 15 years of continuous occupation, conditions on the space station have essentially become a microbiologist’s dream. This could spell bad news for future ISS residents. Read the rest of International Space Station is a germophobe’s nightmare, says new report

Continued here: 
International Space Station is a germophobe’s nightmare, says new report

Made in Space: NASA Creates First-Ever 3D-Printed Object in Space

December 1, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Made in Space: NASA Creates First-Ever 3D-Printed Object in Space

NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station have created the first-ever object to be 3D printed in space . The 3D printer , which was developed by Made in Space , was delivered to the ISS by a SpaceX mission back in September, and on November 17 Expedition Commander Barry “Butch” Wilmore installed and calibrated the device. On November 24 it produced its first component: a faceplate for the printer itself that reads “Made in Space.” Read the rest of Made in Space: NASA Creates First-Ever 3D-Printed Object in Space Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printer , 3D printing , butch wilmore , green design , iss , made in space , nasa , space exploration , spacex , zero gravity

Read the rest here:
Made in Space: NASA Creates First-Ever 3D-Printed Object in Space

Albatern’s WaveNET Harvests Wave Energy With Giant Floating Squids

December 1, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Albatern’s WaveNET Harvests Wave Energy With Giant Floating Squids

Since 2007 Albatern , one of Scotland’s most radical wave energy companies , has been working on a new approach to wave energy harvesting. Their new WaveNET system uses an array of floating generators called Squids to harvest energy from the rise and fall of the ocean. Albatern has set a goal of creating a 1.25-kilometer-long energy farm floating at sea that could produce over 100 megawatts by 2024. Read the rest of Albatern’s WaveNET Harvests Wave Energy With Giant Floating Squids Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: albatern , green grids , scottish renewables , scottish wave energy , squids , wave arrays , wave energy , wavenet

Continued here:
Albatern’s WaveNET Harvests Wave Energy With Giant Floating Squids

Bad Behavior has blocked 1223 access attempts in the last 7 days.