Daniel Libeskind’s ambitious design for The Kurdistan Museum in Iraq

April 14, 2016 by  
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Iraq’s biggest dam could collapse at any moment, placing a million people in peril

March 2, 2016 by  
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The birthplace of civilization has struggled through some tough times in recent years. The Iran-Iraq War, the Gulf War, the Iraq War, and now the conflict with ISIS have seriously damaged Iraq’s infrastructure and undermined its political stability. As if that wasn’t enough, Iraq may soon face another catastrophe as the country’s biggest dam reaches the end of its life. American officials in Baghdad are warning that Mosul Dam could collapse – and the subsequent flooding could lead to the death or displacement of over one million people. Built in 1984, the Mosul Dam regulates the flow of the Tigris River to supply one million Iraqis with hydroelectric power. The dam is capable of holding three trillion gallons of water, which is key for survival in the desert nation. Mosul Dam was constructed on a base of gypsum, a soft mineral that readily dissolves in water. To combat this steady erosion and maintain the infrastructure, engineers have used a grout cement mix to fill any holes that appear. However, this maintenance routine was interrupted in August 2014 when ISIS forces captured the dam for over a week. The militants did not intentionally damage the dam, but their brief presence nonetheless had long-term consequences. Even after the dam was recaptured, many of the Iraqi workers did not return and regular maintenance was not resumed. Related: The world’s tallest building coming to Iraq will be entirely solar-powered The greatest risk of collapse occurs between late February and mid-May when the Tigris River is at its fullest. State Department officials warn that 500,000 people could be killed while a million more would be homeless. Mosul, a city of two and a half million people, could be under 45 feet of water within four hour of the dam’s collapse – and the water level could eventually rise to 70 feet. Baghdad would have a few days notice to prepare, but the flooding would still be devastating, with water levels of up to 14 feet expected. The Italian government has offered to send troops while the Trevi Group, an Italian company, leads much needed repairs of the dam. As usual, politics is proving to be a roadblock. Noting the glacial pace at which the Iraqi government is dealing with the problem, American officials have urged Iraq to educate its citizens on the threat, so that the worst case scenario might be avoided. Via the New York Times Images via DoD News/Staff Sgt. Brendan Stephens and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library

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Iraq’s biggest dam could collapse at any moment, placing a million people in peril

Milan wants to fight pollution by paying commuters to bike to work

March 2, 2016 by  
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After 2015 brought some of the worst air pollution on record, the city of Milan, Italy is considering a dramatic solution to improve air quality: paying residents who choose to ride a bike to work rather than driving. In late December, smog became so severe that the city had to ban the use of cars for three days, along with the traditional end of the year firework displays. So it makes sense that officials are trying out new schemes to cut down on air pollution – and they’ve set aside €35 million to the cause. Read the rest of Milan wants to fight pollution by paying commuters to bike to work

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Magnitude 7.8 Sumatra earthquake results in loss of life, but minimal damage

March 2, 2016 by  
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Indonesia and Australia have both issued tsunami warnings following a magnitude 7.8 earthquake off the island of Sumatra. Indonesia’s warning has since been lifted and no substantial damage has been reported, although there were an unknown number of casualties. The offshore quake was a shallow one, which tend to be associated with more devastation. The U.S. Geological Survey first reported the quake rated 8.2 before lowering the magnitude three times to settle at 7.8. Read the rest of Magnitude 7.8 Sumatra earthquake results in loss of life, but minimal damage

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Crazy all-glass slide will be suspended 1,000 feet high off LA’s tallest tower

March 2, 2016 by  
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Zaid Bin Talib Unveils Plans for Solar-Powered Rainwater-Harvesting Embassy of Iraq in Oslo

June 28, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Zaid Bin Talib Unveils Plans for Solar-Powered Rainwater-Harvesting Embassy of Iraq in Oslo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: embassy building , Embassy of Iraq in Oslo , iraq , norway , oslo architecture , Oslo School of Architecture and Design , photovoltaics , rain water , solar panels , Solar Power , student work , sustainable embassy , Zaid Bin Talib        

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Zaid Bin Talib Unveils Plans for Solar-Powered Rainwater-Harvesting Embassy of Iraq in Oslo

Paul Heijnen’s Inside-Out Construction Cabinet Exposes the Inner Workings of Furniture

June 28, 2013 by  
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Design Academy of Eindhoven graduate Paul Heijnen ‘s Construction Cabinet wears its hinges and supports on the outside, exposing the beauty of mechanisms that are usually concealed. The inside-out double cupboard was prototyped using wood from an old factory’s floorboards, and the finished model is made from stronger local woods like red cedar, oak or recycled plywood. Read the rest of Paul Heijnen’s Inside-Out Construction Cabinet Exposes the Inner Workings of Furniture Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green furniture” , Collaboration O design , Construction Cabinet , craftsmanship , Design Academy of Eindhoven , hidden mechanism , Paul Heijnen , Recycled Materials        

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Turning Wartime T-Walls into Iraqi Affordable Housing

August 28, 2011 by  
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Natural wind tower in housing project in Basrah, Iraq. Rendering by New World Design. At a Pecha Kucha session during this summer’s Dwell on Design conference, I was inspired by a series of seven 7-minute presentations proposed on the theme of “Regeneration.” Dwell magazine editors partnered with Arc… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Turning Wartime T-Walls into Iraqi Affordable Housing

Iraq supposed to witness a 10×10 growth in urbanization in years to come

August 4, 2011 by  
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Nisha Changrani: Concept Masterplan Broadway Malyan shows masterplan for a 10-year project in Iraq. After years of horrendous torment, Iraq has finally a reason to rejoice. The country expects to see the accomplishment of its largest urbanization project till date. At least the planning has already been completed and a masterplan presented by Broadway Malyan, an urbanization and Design practice. The project has been nicknamed 10×10, the reason being that the project is worth $10 billion and is expected to be completed in 10 years. The practice had grabbed the project in an open competition that had been started in 2009 through bidding. A proposal was subsequently tendered, post which, the project planning was commenced in April 2010. The city in question is the Sadr, in the famous Arabic Dreamland, Baghdad. The project includes the extension of the current city up to the dimensions of 17sq km and the construction of a new Sadr city. The idea is to relax the pressure of accommodating the entire population in the present space constraints and create space for 500,000 odd civilians with modern amenities. The officials are confident of the acknowledged levels of specialized skills of the team. The client, the Mayoralty of Baghdad has seen an intimate involvement of the practice in chalking out the masterplan for the sectored build of the city. The implantation tender has already been passed and everything has been beautifully finalized. It is hard to imagine how great it must have been for the concerned population to hear a relieving piece of news after the grabbing turmoil that it has been undergoing till today. Without placing an offence of any exaggeration, of course it would be clear to any sane mind that just a construction project is not all Iraq requires now; it won’t be a literary guilt to assume that good things always begin in the smallest packets. It is good that after grappling with the eternal thirst for its oil reserves, a part of the country is going to taste some success in overcoming the sad plea of its citizens. But this effort should not end up with the completion with the 10×10 project. Considering the fact that Baghdad is an already developed center compared to the rest of Iraq, this project should mark the beginning of a continuous process – a process to make good out of bad, better out of good and the best out of better. Via: BroadwayMalyan

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Iraq supposed to witness a 10×10 growth in urbanization in years to come

Exposed Memo Reveals Definite Ties Between Big Oil and Iraq Invasion

April 19, 2011 by  
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Photo credit: US Army The notion that the Iraq war was really about oil is far beyond speculation — it floats somewhere in that ambiguous realm between generally accepted and assumed-to-be-fact.

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