Nigerian man invents cool jet car that operates on land and water

April 14, 2017 by  
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If you’re ever in Lagos, Nigeria , watch for a quirky aero-amphibious jet car roaming the streets. Self-taught inventor Kehinde Durojaiye transformed a bunch of junk he found into a vehicle capable of operating on land or in water. Durojaiye hopes his invention will one day be a common sight across the country. Durojaiye’s jet car is made with discarded materials, like an old keyboard, an office chair, and a tricycle steering wheel. He also repurposed plastic , wood, and Styrofoam. He said he’s traveled as far away as Ibadan in his vehicle, which is about 84 miles away from Lagos , and that the jet car can reach speeds of around 75 miles per hour on land and six knots at sea. Related: Disabled refugee inventor builds an electric bike to get around camp Durojaiye told CNN, “We want the whole world to know it is possible to have a kind of machine that can move on land, on sea, and fly, and perhaps move under the sea. That’s my ultimate goal.” He invents out of a workshop near a Lagos lagoon dump site, and has already built four prototypes of his car. He also works on other devices like a remote-controlled drone , and has been inventing since childhood. Now married and the father of four children, Durojaiye continues to tinker with his jet car, hoping to make it fly. The jet car has already attracted attention in Lagos; the city is filled with Hyundais and Toyotas so Durojaiye’s vehicle really stands out. He says when he drives people often want to stop and snap pictures of the car on their phones, and have been surprised the vehicle can travel on both land and sea. Lagos is notorious for its congestion, and CNN speculated a flying car like Durojaiye’s could ease traffic. Via CNN Images via screenshot

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Nigerian man invents cool jet car that operates on land and water

8 teenage inventions that could save the world

January 23, 2017 by  
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Sometimes the brightest ideas come in young packages. Teenagers from around the world demonstrate you don’t need a high school diploma to come up with a life-changing invention . From $13 germ-killing door handles to Braille printers, check out these eight teenage inventions that revolutionize the way we view energy , food, and, of course, the oceans . 14-year-old designs pedal-powered washing machine When assigned with laundry duty after her mother got sick, Remya Jose, a 14-year-old girl from India , designed an ingenious pedal-powered washing machine to save the time of doing laundry by hand in a nearby river. Jose made her clever washing machine with recycled bicycle components, creating an appliance that could greatly assist families who lack access to electricity. Related: 13-year-old Maanasa Mendu invents groundbreaking clean energy device that costs just $5 16-year-olds discover way to increase crop yields for Combating the Global Food Crisis project Garden-loving teenagers Ciara Judge, Émer Hickey, and Sophie Healy-Thow of Ireland won the Google Science Fair 2014 with their Combating the Global Food Crisis project. The 16-year-olds paired a bacteria often found in symbiotic relationships with legumes with crops it doesn’t typically associate with, namely oats and barley. Crops that tested their unique pairing were wildly successful, germinating in about half the time and producing a 74 percent greater drymass yield. Increasing crop yields is vital as the global population grows, and discoveries like this one could greatly impact the way we combat food poverty . 19-year-old invents Ocean Cleanup Array For several years now, Inhabitat has been covering the efforts of The Ocean Cleanup CEO Boyan Slat of the Netherlands , who at 19 years old invented an Ocean Cleanup Array , and we’re continually impressed by his persistence. The Ocean Cleanup recently completed their first aerial reconnaissance mission of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch . The results weren’t pretty – 1,000 large plastic pieces spotted in two hours – but there’s still hope to clean up the mess we’ve made. The Ocean Cleanup won the Katerva Award in 2016 , and feasibility studies indicate one 63-mile array could “remove 42 percent of the Great Pacific garbage patch in only 10 years.” 12-year-old builds inexpensive, working Braille printer 12-year-old Shubham Banerjee of California utilized a Lego Mindstorms EV3 kit and about $5 of hardware from Home Depot to design an innovative Braille printer , the Braigo v1.0, that cost way less than similar devices. Around 285 million people are visually impaired worldwide, according to World Health Organization data, but as Braille printers cost over $2,000 when Banerjee invented his device, his disruptive technology held the potential to change how the blind communicate. He went on to start a company, Braigo Labs , and about three years later, has released an app and web platform and continues to develop his groundbreaking printer (and he’s still in high school.) 17-year-old creates a device that can purify water and produce clean energy simultaneously Millions of people around the world live without electricity or clean water , and 17-year-old Cynthia Sin Nga Lam of Australia decided to tackle both issues at once with her portable H2Pro device. The H2Pro unit harnesses photocatalysis, or using light to speed up a chemical reaction, to sterilize water. As a side bonus, the process also yields hydrogen , which Lam said could be used to produce electricity. 17-year-old designs human waste bioreactor to turn human poo into clean energy When Kenya ‘s Maseno School opened up new dormitories for over 700 students in 2013, the area around the students’ home often smelled because of pit latrines and a defective sewage system, which also polluted local freshwater. High schooler Leroy Mwasaru and four friends came up with a solution: a human waste bioreactor that could transform waste into a clean cooking fuel for the kitchen, which had been using firewood. Today, Mwasaru is the founder of Greenpact , a group aiming to provide biogas solutions to over six million Kenyans who lack access to adequate sanitation and renewable energy . 17-year-old and 18-year-old design $13 germ-killing door handle 17-year-old Sun Ming (Simon) Wong and 18-year-old King Pong (Michael) Li of Hong Kong knew bacteria spreads via handles on doors or shopping carts touched by hundreds of people daily. So they hunted for a material that could kill that bacteria and found an answer in titanium oxide. Instead of simply coating a handle in titanium oxide, though, they added an LED light into a bracket holding the handle to truly activate the compound, which can then annihilate 99.8 percent of germs . Even better, the device only costs around $13, meaning it could be accessible for more people worldwide. 16-year-old utilizes ingredients found in pencils and sunscreen to create pollution-cleansing coating Sunscreen and pencils might not be the first two items you’d go to for answers to clean up pollution , but 16-year-old Samuel Burrow of England utilized two ingredients found in those common items to create a “paint-like coating” that has the power to break down pollutants with the help of light. He mixed titanium dioxide with graphene oxide for a concoction with not one, but several applications, in addition to a surface paint. As a sponge, Burrow’s mixture can purify water, and when combined with sand, it has the potential to filter heavy metals out of water. Just imagine how clean the world could be if all buildings were painted with Burrow’s marvelous mix. Images via Brit + Co ; Ciara Judge, Émer Hickey and Sophie Healy-Thow on Google+ ; The Ocean Cleanup ; Shubham Banerjee ; Google Science Fair ; Innovate Kenya ; Student Society for Science ; and screenshot

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8 teenage inventions that could save the world

Scientists turn eggshells into eco-friendly data-storage devices

January 23, 2017 by  
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Walk on eggshells? Not these scientists. A team from Guizhou Institute of Technology is working on a way to turn ground-up bits of the breakfast byproduct into a data-storage device that could pave the way for eco-friendlier computers. The device itself uses something called resistive random-access memory , ReRAM for short, a type of non-volatile, high-density yet energy-sipping memory system that could soon supplant your flash drive as a data silo. Instead of storing a charge, like conventional memory does, ReRAM works by creating electrical resistance across a dielectric solid-state material that transmits voltage without conducting it, essentially serving as an insulator. As it turns out, eggshells have a “large resistive-switching memory,” as the scientists noted in the February 2017 issue of Current Applied Physics , where they published their findings. But don’t start sticking eggs in your USB port just yet. To create the device, they first pulverized the shells for hours into an ultra-fine, nanoscale powder, which they then dissolved in solution. Related: Scientists invent the world’s first microchip powered by biological systems The resulting paste, coated onto a substrate, became the electrolyte portion of a memory chip, that is, the part that carries the electrical charge. Whatever they did worked. The eggshell-based device was able to write 100 bits of binary code into its memory before it broke down. It’ll take some tinkering before the device can stack up against materials that can manage billions of cycles, but the promise is there. “This discovery provides for the possibility of an environmentally friendly, low-cost and sustainable material application in the next-generation nonvolatile date storage device,” the scientists said. Egg -citing. Via New Scientist Photos by Kullez and Bruce Guenter

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Scientists turn eggshells into eco-friendly data-storage devices

16-year-old South African girl invents drought-fighting super material from orange peels

August 10, 2016 by  
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In the midst of South Africa’s worst drought in recorded history, one Johannesburg schoolgirl has created a super absorbent polymer that could change the way crops are grown. The polymer is created from simple, readily available recycled materials – orange peel and avocado skin – and it’s capable of storing hundreds of times its own weight in water. Kiara Nirghin’s project ” No More Thirsty Crops ” won the Google Science Fair’s Community Impact Award for the Middle East and Africa. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwRmICCVY_Q Considering that South Africa’s agricultural union has been pleading with the government for subsidies to help weather the recent water crisis , Nirghin’s project could offer much-needed relief. Her super absorbent material could be used to create reservoirs that farmers could use to maintain their crops at minimal cost. Nirghin knew that other super absorbent polymers rely on chain molecule polysaccharides to give them their power, and her project sprang to life when she learned that orange peel is composed from 64% polysaccharide . It also contains pectin, which is used as a gelling agent in numerous applications. When combined with oily avocado peel and left in the sun, the mixture undergoes a reaction and forms a polymer compound. Related: South Africa is relaxing restrictions on GMOs to fight drought-related food crisis As a Google Science Fair winner, Nirghin has been assigned a mentor from the company to help her develop her idea further, including potential tests on the field. Soon, she’ll learn if she’s one of the sixteen finalists in the global competition – but even if she doesn’t make it to the final round, it sounds like she has a promising career ahead of her. + Google Science Fair Via CNN

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16-year-old South African girl invents drought-fighting super material from orange peels

Quirky Makes Invention Accessible: Coming Today to a TV Near You!

August 30, 2011 by  
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How easy is it to invent something? Maybe not that hard, but how easy is it to make it count. Really hard. Innovation is the single most important thing that sets us apart as a species, yet our society itself can be the hardest roadblock for innovative solutions to the toughest challenges we face today. A firm called Quirky is trying to change all that! Quirky is a crowd-sourced and an open innovation platform that encourages creative thinking and solutions. “For centuries, becoming an “inventor” has been a hard gig to crack. Complexities relating to financing, engineering, distribution, and legalities have stood in the way of brilliant people executing on their great ideas.” Since launching in 2009, Quirky has rapidly changed the way the world thinks about product development. “We bring two brand new consumer products to market each week, by enabling a fluid conversation between a global community and Quirky’s expert product design staff. The world influences our business in real-time, and we share our revenue directly with the people who helped us make successful decisions.” So what exactly is Quirky? Simple. You submit your ideas. If they are good enough they make it big and you make money. You can also “influence” other submitted ideas and earn money. There you have it, an attractive platform that encourages better products and neat ideas. Frank Piller talks about what makes Quirky a great hub for creativity and aptly defines Quirky by saying “.. think of idea contests meeting micro-financing meeting open development “. So who “invented” Quirky? Quirky was founded by Ben Haufman when he was 20 years old! His entrepreneurial journey started during his senior year of high school with the founding of an iPod accessory company called mophie. His invention, mophie won “Best of Show” at MacWorld 2006 and Ben discovered his passion for involving people around the world in the development of new consumer products. Ben sold mophie in August of 2007 and focused his efforts on bringing his idea of ‘social product development’ to the next level. After two years of research and development on the unique technology platform that became the foundation of his future work, Ben publicly launched Quirky in June of 2009. Now after launching super successful products like these and boasting  a community of nearly 60,000 innovators, Quirky is going to debut at a television near you. *Drumroll* All of this creative craziness is going to be showcased in The Sundance Channel’s  new show  Quirky  that premiers today August 30th at 10 pm. The theme of the reality show is the same as the business. Watch the trailer here . Each episode, the Quirky team of design and fabrication geniuses select two product ideas submitted by their online community that seek to solve everyday problems. As the clock counts down, the hopeful inventors are guided through the high-stakes world of innovation from simple sketch to working prototype. Then Quirky shares the profits with all the contributors, including a global group of connected collaborators. The first episode of Quirky greenlights the Ventu, an all-in-one pasta strainer, mixing, and serving bowl dreamed up by a suburban mom. Also in the pipeline is Pivot Power, a flexible power strip that could change the life of its student creator.  In the spirit of the debut, Jeff McIntire-Strasburg of Sustainablog talks about some quirky green tech finds! Watch the show and let us know what you think. In the meantime stay Quirky!

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Quirky Makes Invention Accessible: Coming Today to a TV Near You!

A Constructive Concept: Growing Germs to Wire the Desert

August 17, 2011 by  
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[ By Delana in Art & Design & Science & Research & Technology & Gadgets . ] The search for sustainable building materials has led us through all kinds of natural and man-made substances, from wood to concrete to hemp and bamboo . But a new kind of proposed building material could beat the green power of all of these, and it may soon help to bring grid electricity to the deserts of the United Arab Emirates. (all images via: Evolo ) Ginger Krieg Dosier is an assistant professor of architecture at the American University of Sharjah in the UAE. Her concept for a new, green building material is not terribly far-removed from existing materials, but it could be a simple way to build transmission towers in the desert without relying on materials that have to be transported for long distances. The method proposed by Dosier is similar to one that has recently been proposed by other architects and materials scientists: use a naturally-occurring bacteria called Sporosarcina Pastuerii to create a sort of bio-cement . The common soil bacteria bonds with sand to create a strong, sustainable natural concrete material. But Dosier wants to take the concept one step further and incorporate 3D printing. In Dosier’s method, the bacteria would be grown in a lab and then fed into a 3D printer where it would bind sand together into blocks of bio-cement. The bacteria/sand combination would take the place of the resin/lasers and other methods of joining layer upon layer of material until a desired shape is achieved. The bricks could be made into any desired size, shape and thickness depending on the needs of the specific tower. The bricks would completely harden within two weeks, a process which is sped by the hot, dry desert air. The blocks could be built offsite and inexpensively transported to the building site where they would be used to create load-bearing transmission towers to bring electricity to the remotest desert locations. Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: Bio-Engineered Bricks Grown from Urine, Bacteria & Sand Traditional brick manufacturing is wasteful and releases loads of carbon dioxide into the air. This new, greener method could revolutionize construction. Click Here to Read More »» Hemcrete: Smoking Hot Walls 7 Times Tougher Than Concrete What if there were a building material 7 times stronger than concrete that’s not only carbon neutral but carbon negative? That material is here, and it’s hemp. 3 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» Detox Towers: Architecture that Cleans Urban Air The Detox Towers concept uses a dual algae bio-filter and synthetic membrane system to cleanse the air of pollutants, decreasing greenhouse gas levels. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» [ By Delana in Art & Design & Science & Research & Technology & Gadgets . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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A Constructive Concept: Growing Germs to Wire the Desert

Vertical Farming System Among Best Inventions of 2009

January 11, 2010 by  
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Image credit: Valcent John already wrote about Valcent’s vertical farming systems back in 2008 , and I was excited to learn about a pilot vertical farm project at a UK zoo . So news that Valcent’s vertical farming system has been named as the 16th best invention of 2009 by Time Magazine was bound to catch our interest

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Vertical Farming System Among Best Inventions of 2009

CES 2010 – Navteq Makes Drivers and Pedestrians More Efficient

January 11, 2010 by  
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Navteq, a digital mapping firm owned by Nokia, has some handy applications.

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CES 2010 – Navteq Makes Drivers and Pedestrians More Efficient

Amazing New Shipping Container Folds Flat In 30 Seconds

January 8, 2010 by  
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Gizmag Shipping containers revolutionized commerce and the transportation of goods, and almost singlehandedly made globalism possible through a dramatic reduction in shipping costs, time and losses. But they are not problem-free; unless trade is balanced they tend to pile up at one end of the line. They are expensive to move when empty, particularly on trucks, where it costs the same to move an empty one as a full one

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Amazing New Shipping Container Folds Flat In 30 Seconds

CES 2010 – eReaders Go Bonkers At CES, Sales Expected to Double…Should We Be Scared?

January 8, 2010 by  
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Last year it was all about the netbooks. This year, it’s all about the e-readers.

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CES 2010 – eReaders Go Bonkers At CES, Sales Expected to Double…Should We Be Scared?

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