Robotic fish offer a solution to controlling invasive species

September 17, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Robotic fish offer a solution to controlling invasive species

Invasive species have become a growing environmental challenge, causing serious harm to ecosystems. An interdisciplinary team from New York University (NYU) and the University of Western Australia is utilizing robotic fish to curb the damaging effects of invasive species by scaring the invaders enough so that they reproduce less. For the study, the invasive species in question are mosquitofish. The enormous environmental impact that mosquitofish have unleashed has led the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to list them amongst the world’s 100 most-harmful invasive exotic species. Related: Invasive longhorned tick could spread disease across the US What makes mosquitofish a successful invasive species? For one, in their new environments, they no longer contend with their primary predators, the largemouth bass. This allows mosquitofish populations to burgeon. Secondly, mosquitofish have high genetic variability, permitting them to acclimate and adapt quickly. They spread exponentially throughout their new environment, often displacing local fauna by out-competing for the same food or even preying on them. To address the challenge of invasive mosquitofish, lead researcher Maurizio Porfiri of NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering, together with a team of collaborators, has conducted biomimicry experiments in the laboratory using biologically inspired robotic fish. The robot fish act as predators, simulating largemouth bass, to provoke mosquitofish stress responses. Stressing the invasive mosquitofish depletes their energy reserves and, in turn, disrupts their reproduction rates. “To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using robots to evoke fear responses in this invasive species ,” Porfiri explained. “The results show that a robotic fish that closely replicates the swimming patterns and visual appearance of the largemouth bass has a powerful, lasting impact on mosquitofish in the lab setting.” Porfiri is no stranger to biomimetic robotics. For over a decade, Porfiri has designed and deployed robotic fish, studying their interactions with live fish to glean new insights into animal behavior. This recent research moves the scientific community closer toward realizing the potential of aquatic robots in assisting with environmental protection efforts. “Further studies are needed to determine if these effects translate to wild populations , but this is a concrete demonstration of the potential of robotics to solve the mosquitofish problem,” confirmed Giovanni Polverino, Forrest Fellow at the University of Western Australia’s Department of Biological Sciences and lead author of the paper. “We have a lot more work going on between our schools to establish new, effective tools to combat the spread of invasive species.” + Journal of the Royal Society Interface Image via NYU

Read the original here: 
Robotic fish offer a solution to controlling invasive species

Studio Gangs Solstice tower in Chicago is shaped by the sun

September 17, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Studio Gangs Solstice tower in Chicago is shaped by the sun

In Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood rises Solstice on the Park, a 26-story residential tower with an angular design that has been shaped by solar studies. Created by local architectural practice Studio Gang Architects , the 250-unit modern building is highly site-specific to minimize energy demands — a sustainable approach that earned the project two Green Globes in the Green Globes Certification ranking. The apartment complex is also topped with a green roof and optimized for expansive views of Jackson Park to the south and Chicago’s skyline to the north. Completed in 2018, Solstice on the Park catches the eye with the angled cuts in its facade that were created in response to optimum sun angles in Chicago’s latitude — 72 degrees in summer and 42 degrees in winter. The inward incline helps mitigate unwanted solar gain in summer, while maximizing solar advantage from the low sun in winter time. This approach allows natural light to fill the building — thus reducing reliance on artificial lighting — without straining the heating and cooling systems. Related: Studio Gang to “sustainably grow” Toronto with this energy-efficient tower Tilting the facade inward also created opportunities for landscaped terraces , where residents can enjoy indoor-outdoor living and city views. The sloped, floor-to-ceiling expanses of glass also play a trick on the eye and make the treetops of the nearby park look closer and larger. The non-glazed portions of the residential building are clad in Rieder non-combustible, glass fiber-reinforced concrete panels, measuring 13 millimeters thick each. The selected textured concrete panels are of a variety of colors, from liquid black to beige, as a sensitive nod to the district’s existing architecture characterized by sandstone and brick tones. The angled design gives the 250-foot tower a decidedly modern edge without looking out of place with the city’s boxy high-rises. + Studio Gang Images via Rieder

Here is the original post:
Studio Gangs Solstice tower in Chicago is shaped by the sun

Raad Studio creates advanced solar funnel to grow plants deep underground

November 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Raad Studio creates advanced solar funnel to grow plants deep underground

The innovative team behind NYC’s Low Line have designed advanced solar technology that allows plant life to thrive deep underground. Raad Studio’s latest installation Invasive Regeneration uses a high-powered, solar-powered funnel installed at street level to shoot light onto a concrete block underground, allowing vegetation to grow in an otherwise inhospitable environment. The technology behind Invasive Regeneration is an extension of that used to create NYC’s subterranean park , the Lowline. Created by James Ramsey and Dan Barasch, the world’s first underground park implements an innovative daylighting system of fiber optic cables and mirrors to capture and funnel sunlight underground. Related: Brooklyn Hotel by creators of the Lowline boasts winding gardens and tiny hidden spaces According to the team, the solar-powered installation – which is currently on display at the 2017 Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism – is inspired by the complex relationship between nature and the manmade environment. Their description of the project reads, “Nature represents both decay and renewal, and the continual struggle to gain mastery over the natural world can be inverted to foster growth and rebirth.” + Raad Studio Images via Raad Studio

Read more from the original source:
Raad Studio creates advanced solar funnel to grow plants deep underground

Invasivores Exercise Eradication by Mastication in the Fight Against Exotic Species

July 21, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Invasivores Exercise Eradication by Mastication in the Fight Against Exotic Species

Read the rest of Invasivores Exercise Eradication by Mastication in the Fight Against Exotic Species Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: autumn olive , beetle , beetles , blackberries , conservation , eating beetles , eating bugs , eating snails , ecological balance , ecology , eradicate , eradication , eradication by mastication , exotic species , foodie , honeysuckle , invasive , invasive insects , invasive species , invasivore , June beetles , june bugs , kudzu , lyco berry , lycoberries , lycoberry , purslane , snails , Weird Foods

See original here:
Invasivores Exercise Eradication by Mastication in the Fight Against Exotic Species

Could Lasers Be the New Way to Kill Weeds?

May 22, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Could Lasers Be the New Way to Kill Weeds?

When gardening, we’re sure many of you have used herbicides to kill weeds and other invasive plants. However, the thing about herbicides is that in order to kill weeds, they are often very toxic and affect everything from those using them to potentially the groundwater. To prevent any possible environmental damage with herbicides in the future, a team from the Leibniz University in Hannover, Germany have developed a hi-tech alternative:  weed-killing lasers ! Read the rest of Could Lasers Be the New Way to Kill Weeds? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco friendly herbicide , eco friendly laser , herbicide laser , Laser Zentrum Hannover (LZH) , Leibniz University , Leibniz University weed laser , Leibniz University weeds herbicide , weed killing laser

Here is the original:
Could Lasers Be the New Way to Kill Weeds?

Red Squirrels in England Could Be Extinct in 20 Years

September 27, 2011 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Red Squirrels in England Could Be Extinct in 20 Years

Photo credit: Peter G Trimming / Creative Commons The red squirrel is common throughout Europe but the prospect for the species—and many other small mammals—in England is not good. Pollution, pesticide use, and habitat loss are driving many of the declines. For the red squirrel, the threat comes from competition with the invasive gray squirrel and a rapidly spreading disease that targets the species. How bad is the problem? A recent survey estimates that the… Read the full story on TreeHugger

See the original post here:
Red Squirrels in England Could Be Extinct in 20 Years

How Do Invasive Species Spread? From Rats, to Carp, to Kudzu…

March 28, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on How Do Invasive Species Spread? From Rats, to Carp, to Kudzu…

We talk a lot about invasive species on TreeHugger, following the news on how species get from their native habitat to a new ecosystem and, once there, wreak havoc. Some of the most interesting invasive species are Asian carp, kudzu and even rats since they have the most frighteningly impressive impacts on their new ecosystems

Here is the original post:
How Do Invasive Species Spread? From Rats, to Carp, to Kudzu…

Invasive Quagga Mussels Could Eat Lake Michigan Ecosystem to Point of Collapse

September 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Invasive Quagga Mussels Could Eat Lake Michigan Ecosystem to Point of Collapse

photo: Wikipedia Forget about the potential damage by invasive Asian carp, another invasive species, the quagga mussel is likely to destroy the Lake Michigan ecosystem long before the bottom-feeding fish do. That’s the word of Michigan Tech biologist W. Charles Kerfoot , who says the proliferating mussels are eating up so much phytoplankton that, through an interesting chain of events,

View original here: 
Invasive Quagga Mussels Could Eat Lake Michigan Ecosystem to Point of Collapse

Eating Lionfish May Be the Only Way to Stop their Caribbean Invasion

April 20, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Eating Lionfish May Be the Only Way to Stop their Caribbean Invasion

Image credit: tibchris /Flickr Coral reefs in the Caribbean and Bahamas are already struggling to cope with nitrate pollution, sediment deposits, coral bleaching , ocean acidification , and overfishing.

Read more from the original source: 
Eating Lionfish May Be the Only Way to Stop their Caribbean Invasion

Octopus Steals Diver’s Camera, Shoots Home Movie With It (Video)

April 20, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Octopus Steals Diver’s Camera, Shoots Home Movie With It (Video)

Photo: Screen grab from the video. “cheeky octopus” It’s not every day that an octopus steals your camera while it is recording. This happened to a diver named Victor Huang in Wahine Memorial, Wellington, off the coast of New Zealand

Originally posted here:
Octopus Steals Diver’s Camera, Shoots Home Movie With It (Video)

Bad Behavior has blocked 1293 access attempts in the last 7 days.